Kundenrezensionen


11 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (5)
4 Sterne:
 (3)
3 Sterne:
 (1)
2 Sterne:
 (1)
1 Sterne:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


11 von 12 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Very interesting, but not exactly an easy read
In this book, the author tries to make a case to put our notion of morality onto the scientific landscape with clear cut do's, don'ts and their relevant explanation, as opposed to something that may be different for each of us and each culture. Naturally, in doing so he has to heavily criticize many different common practices from all around the world, most notably female...
Veröffentlicht am 15. November 2010 von K. Haigh

versus
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Useless advice based on a confused theory
Having read Sam Harris' publications on atheism, which I liked a lot, I expected to read a scientific book on moral psychology (like „The Righteous Mind“ by Jonathan Haidt, one of my favorites). But my disappointment and frustration with Sam Harris grew with every page I read. It is annoying, arrogant and, above all, bad science.

His project can be...
Vor 13 Tagen von Samuel "Sammy" Burt veröffentlicht


‹ Zurück | 1 2 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

11 von 12 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Very interesting, but not exactly an easy read, 15. November 2010
Von 
In this book, the author tries to make a case to put our notion of morality onto the scientific landscape with clear cut do's, don'ts and their relevant explanation, as opposed to something that may be different for each of us and each culture. Naturally, in doing so he has to heavily criticize many different common practices from all around the world, most notably female circumcision and suppression, among many others.

He makes a very strong case that you can judge the morality of your actions by the well-being of the affected people, and that you can map right and wrong decisions in your brain, which is why psychopaths will be unable to alter their behaviour (they lack the ability to see the wrong in their actions).

All in all this book is very, very interesting, but especially in the beginning I found it very difficult to get into this book and follow his train of thoughts. It probably helps if you can lock yourself into a remote cabin over a long, rainy weekend...
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Useless advice based on a confused theory, 16. August 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values (Taschenbuch)
Having read Sam Harris' publications on atheism, which I liked a lot, I expected to read a scientific book on moral psychology (like „The Righteous Mind“ by Jonathan Haidt, one of my favorites). But my disappointment and frustration with Sam Harris grew with every page I read. It is annoying, arrogant and, above all, bad science.

His project can be summed up in a few words:
As medecine is to health, moral values are to „human well-being“. As there are doctors who tell us how to live if we want to stay healthy, there are, or more precisely: there should be moral experts who could look at the moral landscape and see which values are conducive or well-being, and which are detrimental (= the peaks and valleys of the landscape).

Harris claims that the following three steps should be distinguished:
1. We can explain why people tend to follow certain pattern of thoughts and behaviour in the name of morality (that's basically what Jonathan Haidt, Joshua Greene, Roy Baumeister and other social psychologists are doing)
2. We can think more clearly about the nature of moral truth and determine which pattern of thoughts and behaviour we should follow in the name of morality (that's the point where Harris parts company with Haidt, Greene et al.)
3. We can convince people who are committed to silly and harmful pattern of thought and behaviour to break these commitments and to live better lives (that's the punch line of Harris' project, to make this world a better place).

I would like to add another point: (4) These people we are trying to convince will point out to us that we are totally misguided and that we should repent and change our values and behaviours.

Harris' project of „moralistic engineering“ is bound to be a failure because it's based on sloppy thinking. Everything is muddled in this theory: Truth, values, usefulness. A sentence like „Smoking increases the risk of lung-cancer“ has a completely different logical structure than a sentence like „Children should honor their parents and support them in their dotage“. The last sentence does not express something that can be verified, it expresses a desire: „X should be Y“. All science can do is to look in which cultures parents are honored by their children, and science can even try to find out if this practice of intergenerational cohesion has good or bad consequences for the society as a whole. But even the most useful practice does not establish a value!

My main objection to his project is: Harris simply does not know what moral values are, how they originate and how they function. He actually critizises social psychologists like Jon Haidt who just do research on these issues. Harris' approach is strictly top-down: Values are features of a society and they could be implemented and manipulated according to the latest research, much like doctors are able to tell us what to eat and what to avoid (by the way: doctors' advice tend to change quite often...). If science finds out that members of an „honor culture“ are less happy that members of a modern society that treat matters of honor lighty, than these scientists should go to, say, Albania or rural Turkey and tell those people: Look, your values are clearly detrimental to your well-being. You should adopt our values and you'll be all better off! That's nonsense.

Let's do the following thought experiment: If science found out that, beyond any reasonable doubt, the happiest people in the USA are uneducated, God-fearing inhabitants of small-town America, would Prof. Harris burn his books, start praying and move to Morontown, Kentucky? Of course not.
He would find dozens of flaws in the research, he would point out that correlation does not equal causation. He would dismiss the evidence because his values and his way of life are constitutive of his identity, and of the life of his friends. Nobody changes his or her values just because some egghead comes along with some sheets of statistics „proving“ that my values are sub-optimal.

If scientists in America are unable to convince the majority of their compatriots of the fact of evolution, how will they convince farmers in India or Marocco of the „fact“ that Hindu or Muslim values are detrimental to their own well-being? Even if (and that's a big if!) Harris's science was right, even if (again a BIG „if“!) one could measure well-being objectively and find stable correlations with values, like we do with smoking and lung-cancer, even in this very unlikely case that would be no way to implement these findings.

Values originated bottom-up, and they can only be changed bottom-up, and that's a long and tortuous road to be travelled. We all agree that the mutilation of gentitals of little girls in Egypt and Sudan is a crime, that it should stop as soon as possible. But this cannot be done by switching off the underlying detrimental values and replacing them by more enlighted values. The change has to come from within the society, bottom up, over many generations. The last decade in Iraq is a good example what happens when an enlighted power, coming from outside, tries to implement top-down a change of values and way of life in a „retarded“ society.

To sum it up: This book certainly does not contribute to our understanding of how societies function, neither does it contribute to making this world a better place. It's a typical product right from the ivory tower, and it's a bad product into the bargain. If only the theory was good there could be some practical value in it too. But since the basic theory is already flawed, there is nothing to be learned for our daily lives.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


13 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Seminal, 18. November 2010
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
It is difficult to get into the book, and I could only read the first part in snippets, as the concepts are new. It is worth the while to take the time to understand the concepts, though. As Harris demonstrates, moral behaviour measured on the well-being it obviates or fosters can indeed be analysed scientifically and without any reference to higher beings. I consider this a seminal book.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Gut und böse - Alles eine Frage der Wissenschaft?, 28. Juli 2013
Von 
Michael Dienstbier "Privatrezensent ohne fina... (Bochum) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)    (REAL NAME)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values (Taschenbuch)
Gibt es so etwas wie universell herleitbare und somit gültige moralische Werte? Wie ließe sich solch eine Moral begründen? Oder hat doch jeder Kulturkreis sein eigenes Wertesystem, so dass die Frage nach einer allgemein gültigen Ethik unweigerlich eine qualitative Herabsetzung der jeweils anderen bedeutet? Sam Harris, bekannt geworden durch religionskritische Bücher wie The End of Faith oder Letter to a Christian Nation, versucht in seiner Darstellung "The Moral Landscape – How science can determine moral values" eine auf wissenschaftlichen Kriterien basierende Ethik zu begründen, welche den Anspruch erheben kann, kulturkreisunabhängig für die gesamte Menschheit Gültigkeit zu besitzen.

"Now that we have consciousness on the table, my further claim is that the concept of 'well-being' captures all that we can intelligbly value. And 'morality' [...] really relates to the intentions and behaviour that affect the well-being of conscious creatures" (32f.). Harris setzt voraus, dass jeder Mensch, egal ob aus einer europäischen Großstadt oder aus dem Regenwald stammend, identische körperliche Grundbedingungen aufweise, Leid, Schmerz und Glück zu empfinden. Dies zu Grunde legend ließen sich auch klare Antworten auf Fragen geben, was denn nun moralisch 'gut' oder 'böse' sei. Gut ist demnach das, was das menschliche Wohlbefinden mehrt. Dabei spielen auch die auf unserem Planeten geltenden Naturgesetze eine entscheidende Rolle, da wir alle diesen Gesetzen ausgesetzt sind und diese einen zentralen Einfluss auf unser Wohlbefinden haben: "Conscious minds and their states are natural phenomena, of course, fully constrained by the laws of Nature [...]. Therefore, there must be right and wrong answers to questions of morality and values that potentially fall within the purview of science" (195).

Eine allgemein gültige Moral basierend auf den Naturgesetzen und dem Faktum unserer körperlichen Existenz; bleibt da noch Platz für die Religionen, die ja auch heute noch einen Monopolanspruch auf Fragen, welche moralische Normen betreffen, erheben? Harris behauptet, dass Religionen zu den größten Hindernissen gehören, wenn es um die Maximierung des menschlichen Wohlbefindens gehe: "It seems to me that few concepts have offered greater scope for human cruelty than the idea of an immortal soul that stands independant of all material influences, ranging from genes to economic systems" (110).

Fazit: Erhellend, provozierend, fesselnd zu lesen; "The Moral Landscape" gehört in das Bücherregal von allen, die an einer wohl begründeten Ethik jenseits von Göttern und Religionen interessiert sind. Dennoch bleibt die Frage, inwieweit eine auf wissenschaftlichen Prämissen basierende Ethik dem Wandel unterworfen ist, abhängig von der Widerlegung oder Weiterentwicklung eben jener Prämissen. Die Antwort auf diese Frage bleibt Harris schuldig.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


6 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Sam Harris, schlägt erneut zu, 17. September 2012
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values (Taschenbuch)
Das Buch ist wohl eines der wichtigsten Werke der letzten Jahre. Sam Harris argumentiert mal wieder
bestechend gut und seine Ansätze sind sehr Interresant. Ich hab dieses Buch mehreren Personen die ich
kenne empfohlen, weil sie auch glaubten das nur Religion ein Fundament für ethische Fragen bieten
könnte. Alle waren nach der Lektüre nicht nur anderer Meinung vor allem waren ihre Illsusionen bezüglich
Moralischem Relativismus nun Geschichte. Ich kann dieses Buch uneingeschränkt empfehlen.
Wem dieses Buch gefallen sollte, kann ich auch andere Bücher von Sam Harris empfehlen, wie Free Will, oder
The end of Faith.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


8 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Plädoyer für eine wissenschaftlich informierte Ethik, 2. April 2012
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values (Taschenbuch)
Ich finde, dieses Buch hat das Zeug dazu, eines der einflussreichsten Bücher seiner Zeit zu werden. Sam Harris entwirft das Modell einer "ethischen Landschaft". Deren Täler repräsentieren Zustände ethischen Versagens, "the greatest possible misery for everyone", während die Gipfel Zustände maximalen Wohlergehen, "heights of human flourishing" abbilden. Wie eine Gesellschaft sich in dieser Landschaft bewegt, um das Wohlergehen ihrer Mitglieder zu verbessern, kann und sollte Gegenstand wissenschaftlicher Forschung sein, meint Sam Harris. Ethisches Handeln sollte sich an rationalen Überlegungen statt an einem dogmatischen oder religiös inspirierten Wertekanon orientieren.

Grundmaxime seiner Überlegungen ist die konsequentialistische Fragestellung: "Wird durch diese Handlung (oder Unterlassung) Leid an empfindungsfähigen Wesen verursacht?" Wir empfinden keine ethische Verantwortung gegenüber Steinen; und Primaten gegenüber größere als gegenüber Insekten. Unsere ethischen Skrupel wachsen mit der Erlebensfähigkeit der betroffenen Individuen. Und tatsächlich findet sich keine ethische Entscheidung, welches sich nicht auf diese Fragestellung zurückführen ließe. Selbst der dogmatischen Ethik liegt (oft unbemerkt) diese Gleichung zugrunde - und führt bei irrationalen Prämissen zu irrationalen Resultaten. Wer wirklich der Überzeugung ist, der Gebrauch von Kondomen wird mit dem ewigen Fegefeuer bestraft, wird plausiblerweise Kondomgebrauch ablehnen, um unendliches Leid für die unsterbliche Seele zu verhindern. Wer wirklich der Überzeugung ist, ein allmächtiger Gott erzürne sich über einen Ehebruch und straft die menschliche Gemeinschaft für diese Verfehlung, der wird Ehebruch unter Strafe stellen, um Leid von empfindungsfähigen Wesen abzuwenden.

Ausführlich geht Sam Harris auf einen jahrhundertealten philosophischen Einwand ein, der ihm auch von vielen Lesern des Buches vorgehalten wird: Nach Humes Gesetz kann aus rein deskriptiven Aussagen nicht logisch auf normative Vorschriften geschlossen werden. Anders gesagt: Aus dem "Ist" kann kein "Soll" abgeleitet werden. Die wissenschaftliche Methode mag die Auswirkungen verwirklichter ethischer Prinzipien zutreffend beschreiben, aber aus dieser Bestandsaufnahme können keine ethischen Gesetze abgeleitet werden.

Müssen sie auch nicht, meint Sam Harris. Vorschriften sind hier genauso unnötig, wie auf anderen Gebieten, wo die wissenschaftliche Methode Erfolge errungen hat. Beispielsweise haben die Erkenntnisse der wissenschaftlichen Medizin die Lebensqualität der Menschheit und die Qualität der Medizin erheblich verbessert. Dennoch ist niemand gezwungen, diese Erkenntnisse zu beherzigen. Gleichwohl sind politische Entscheidungsträger gut beraten, in relevanten Entscheidungsprozessen darauf zurückzugreifen. Das gleiche gilt für Erkenntnisse einer Ethik-Wissenschaft. Auch ohne einen universellen normativen Anspruch werden viele dankbar darauf zurückgreifen.

Nachdem bei vielen Lesern die Erwartungshaltung verankert zu sein scheint, eine Ethik benötige einen universellen Gültigkeitsanspruch, braucht dieser Perspektivwechsel etwas Zeit und eine Umorientierung, die vielleicht nicht sofort gelingt. Ich habe das Buch zweimal und die Argumentation noch öfter gelesen, bevor sie mir einleuchtete. (Vorher ging mir der gleiche Einwand durch den Kopf, wie vielen Kritikern: "Aber wer legt denn fest, dass die Ergebnisse einer Ethik-Wissenschaft anzuwenden sind, statt irgendeines anderen ethischen Codex?") Harris' implizite Antwort: Das legt niemand fest. Niemand schreibt mir eine ausgewogene Ernährung und ausreichend Bewegung vor, statt den ganzen Tag mit der Chipstüte auf dem Sofa zu sitzen. Wenn mir meine Gesundheit jedoch am Herzen liegt, bin ich gut beraten, den Erkenntnissen der wissenschaftlichen Medizin zuzuhören. Wenn ich daran interessiert bin, ethische Entscheidungen zu treffen, die das Wohlergehen empfindungsfähiger Wesen berücksichtigen, bin ich gut beraten, die Erkenntnisse einer Ethik-Wissenschaft anzuerkennen.

Freilich gibt es keine Garantie dafür, dass ein wissenschaftlich gelenkter Weg über die "ethische Landschaft" ein stetiges bergauf bedeutet. Aus anderen Fakultäten sind wir mit Paradigmenwechseln vertraut und Erkenntnisse werden zeitweise modifiziert oder gänzlich überworfen.
Dennoch dürfte ein rationaler Zugang zu ethischen Fragestellungen zu überlegeneren Ergebnissen führen, als die blinde Adhärenz an tradierte Normen, wie wir sie oft erleben. Wie unethisch (dem Wohlergehen empfindungsfähiger Individuen abträglich) ist es wirklich, Cannabis zu konsumieren? Wie abträglich im Vergleich zu anderen Rauschmitteln? Ist es ethisch vertretbar, Schwerverbrecher, Mörder, Vergewaltiger vorzeitig aus überfüllten Gefängnissen zu entlassen, um Platz für "non violent drug-offenders" zu schaffen? (Laut Sam Harris gängige Praxis in den USA.) Ist Schwangerschaftsabbruch unethisch? Wird hier Leid verursacht? Direkt am Fötus? Oder indirekt an der Gesellschaft durch eine allgemein akzeptierte Abwertung ungeborenen Lebens als leicht beherrschbare Unannehmlichkeit? Wer an aufrichtigen Antworten auf diese Fragen interessiert ist, wird auf die wissenschaftliche Methode, auf die systematische Untersuchung der Auswirkungen verschiedener ethischer Prinzipien, nicht verzichten können.

Eine zwanzigminütige Zusammenfasung seiner Thesen gibt Sam Harris beim TED-Talk 2010. Wen das interessiert - eine Suchmaschine fragen nach:
TED Sam Harris Science can answer moral questions.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen ground breaking, 25. Mai 2011
Von 
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
I like others had difficulties getting my head around all the concepts he introduced at the beginning of the book. I found myself going back and forth between the chapters of the book and the Notes section. (It was not a nuisance I was practically hooked). A good introduction to the book is his TED talk about "how science can answer moral questions"

What he basically argues is that from the point of view of the brain there is little or no neurological difference between facts and values. And that if we agree that morality is about maximising human well-being on a global as well as on an individual level that questions of morality are tacit questions that are subject to scientific enquiry. Of course that is not the only thing he argues, however I suggest you look at TED and if you're still curious you will probably not regret reading this book.

I did enjoyed reading it...
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Extraordinarily thought-provoking., 15. Februar 2013
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
If you like Sam Harris's writing, you'll love this.

If you don't, then keep an open mind - it's exceptionally thought provoking & very good exercise for the brain.

What is right / wrong & how do we define these concepts ?

Not too high-brow either - any reasonably intelligent person will find this book extraordinary.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Gut mit Einschränkungen., 9. Februar 2013
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values (Taschenbuch)
Gut, aber häufig redundant. Roter Faden geht schon mal verloren. Trotzdem ein interessanter Ausblick aus einer neuen Perspektive. Aus meiner Sicht: empfehlenswert.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


11 von 26 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Good intention, flawed realization, 28. Oktober 2010
Von 
Michael Murauer "mmurauer" (Deggendorf; Niederbayern) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
This time the focus of Sam Harris' attacks is less on religious prejudice than on an indifferentistic moral relativism which may impede modern pluralistic and secular society in defending its values. He cites some striking examples of this attitude delivered by anthropologists and psychologists. Though we shouldn't overestimate the influence of this attitude an attack on it is commendable. But what's about the remedy Harris proposes? He wants to convince us that science is able to provide objective values directly. Well, there is no doubt that knowledge and science are a very important precondition for an individual and a society to develop and adopt reasonable and adequate values. But that doesn't mean that science discovers or develops these values directly. Harris erroneously attacks what he misunderstands as 'the naturalistic fallacy' ' and what we should better name the 'Is-Ought-Fallacy' in order to prevent this kind of misunderstanding. Sure, values are facts as well but these value-facts don't tell us which of them to choose ' that's what Hume meant and what is still valid. Progress in individual and social value systems is a historical process which procedes as a cultural development on the basis (but not under the spell) of our evolutionary heritage (to which cruelty belongs as much as altruism). Knowledge and science make a very important contribution to better value systems, but they can't produce and justify them directly. A tradition of 2500 years of critical thinking is more likely to come up with adequate values than a tradition of 2000 or 1400 years of repeating the same religious dogma. To accept the long cultural tradition of enlightenment and secular humanism as somehow 'arbitrary' and not enough to justify decisions for certain values and morals is falling into the trap of religious thinking with its illusionary ideas of privileged justification by revelation or whatever kind of unarguable authority.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 2 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values
The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values von Sam Harris (Taschenbuch - 13. September 2011)
EUR 11,20
Auf Lager.
In den Einkaufswagen Auf meinen Wunschzettel
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen