Kundenrezensionen


150 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (107)
4 Sterne:
 (20)
3 Sterne:
 (10)
2 Sterne:
 (7)
1 Sterne:
 (6)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Which came first?
After reading Ender's Game, and loving it more than I thoughtpossible, I read "Speaker for the Dead". In theintroduction, (if you ever bother to read those things), the authorpoints out that Speaker was his original idea. He wrote "Ender's Game" as BACKGROUND! "Game" won the Hugo and Nebula awards as a background novel. In this story we...
Veröffentlicht am 17. März 2000 von Glade Cornelius

versus
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Not as good as Ender's Game
The writing becomes dull and overly religious. Ender's Game's plot was much more interesting. I loved Ender's Game and really wanted to read this book but it was very dissapointing.
Am 17. Februar 1999 veröffentlicht


‹ Zurück | 1 215 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Which came first?, 17. März 2000
After reading Ender's Game, and loving it more than I thoughtpossible, I read "Speaker for the Dead". In theintroduction, (if you ever bother to read those things), the authorpoints out that Speaker was his original idea. He wrote "Ender's Game" as BACKGROUND! "Game" won the Hugo and Nebula awards as a background novel. In this story we "meet" Ender again, this time as a rather jaded thirty-something man who has to keep his identity a secret. History has unfairly branded him a mass murderer rather than the hero as he was first regarded, or the abused child he was in reality. He is the original "Speaker for the Dead", a humanistic ideology/psuedo-religeon that teaches the virtues of the truth. Don't let this mumbo jumbo throw you, its a great read that doesn't get too mystical. The book would be great on its own, but it's all the greater because anyone who's read "Ender's game" already knows the protagonist in more depth than any character in recent memory from any book. Ender is our childhood friend, who we have the priviledge of meeting again in adulthood. The reader will root for the boy to become greater than the myth and end his life of lonliness. He is summoned to a colony world that has discovered another form of sentient life. Ender is there to speak a death, (give an honest to the point of being harsh eulogy), but finds himself once again wrapped up in the politics of humanity. Basically he has to save the Portuguese Catholic world of Lusitania from a variety of things that would destroy it. What turns out to be his hardest task though is helping a family in emotional distress.
If it sounds complicated, it isn't. Card has given us another moral human tale, told in great detail and depth, yet never boring. Although the events in this book are far less catostrophic than the events our "hero" went through in Ender's game, the emotional impact is still there. We see what became of the lonly mistreated little genius, and how his life turned out. In "Game" Ender was battling for his own personal sanity and survival, playing by the rules of his controllers. In "Speaker", Ender fights for others. He has more control over the circumstances and chooses to help people he barely knows, and the last survivor of the race he was accused of wiping out.
We get a philosophically different book than "Ender's game", but it still has the power to break your heart and lift your spirits. We get a whole new set of personal moral dillemas, and see the dark and light sides of relationships. This book may be different in tone and philosophy than the prequel, but the main player is still intact. If you've read "Ender's Game", this is a must read. If you haven't, don't read this book yet. You'll like it, but that prize winning background novel is still worth the effort before going on to "Speaker". These two are the best books I've read in years.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A landmark of sci-fi and humanism, 2. Juli 2000
Von 
William Krischke (Portland, OR United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
As he tells us in the introduction (which is, by the way, the best introduction I've ever read), this is the book Card intended to write when he began the ever-popular Ender series. Ender's Game was simply a prologue -- originally a short story.
There are so many good things about this book. Card has a talent for writing deep, real characters that I've never seen in sci-fi and seldom in any modern literature. He is a master storyteller, and this book is wonderfully paced -- you will continually be twisting your brain trying to uncover what is up with the pequeninos before the scientists do.
But most of all, this book is a eloquent manifesto of humanism. As Speaker for the Dead, it is our hero Ender's lifelong task to understand people and tell the truth about them -- a truth that will reveal their good, bad, and ugly, but most importantly, their inherent worth and um, goodness. This truth-seeking carries from the individual to the entire races, as Card (and Ender) examine how we relate to those we don't understand, even those we can't understand.
So what is it? It's a page-turner, crazy idea-filled(as all sci-fi should be) thrilling, thoughtful, powerful, funny, poignant novel. It is an excellent piece of writing that I would love to see taught in high school classrooms.
My only problems with it are that terrible cover(who designed these covers? They have nothing to do with the story -- not even the tone of the story) and the sometimes indecipherable use of portuguese. But those are both minor.
An excerpt:
"We know you now. That makes all the difference, doesn't it? Even Quim doesn't hate you now. When you really know somebody, you can't hate them." "Or maybe it's just that you can't really know them until you stop hating them." "Is that a circular paradox? Dom Cristao says that most truth can be only expressed in circular paradoxes." "I don't think it has anything to do with truth, Olhado. It's just cause and effect. We can never sort them out. Science refuses to admit any cause except first cause-- knock down one domino, the one next to it also falls. But when it comes to human beings, the only type of cause that matters is final cause, the purpose. What a person had in mind. Once you understand what people really want, you can't hate them anymore. You can fear them, but you can't hate them, because you can always find the same desires in your own heart."
If you'd like to discuss this novel, e-mail me at krischwe@whitman.edu
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Not as good as Ender's Game, 17. Februar 1999
Von Ein Kunde
The writing becomes dull and overly religious. Ender's Game's plot was much more interesting. I loved Ender's Game and really wanted to read this book but it was very dissapointing.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Sequel to Ender's Game requires a different mindset., 6. Juni 1997
Von Ein Kunde
As a teacher, I have insisted that my high school freshmen all read Ender's Game. The fast pace and excellent character development engage the students and lead them toward discussion of serious issues, like how we treat those who are "different" and the ultimate goals and purposes of education. Speaker for the Dead has a different focus, and perhaps a different audience. Although many of my students have read it because they so loved Ender's Game, not many were ready for its sophistication.
Speaker for the Dead works for me in its treatment of two major issues. The first of these, expressed through the interaction (and its disastrous results) between the piggies and the humans, has to do with cultural relationships and the arrogant assumptions often made by the dominant culture. The humans function at a level of cultural blindness hard to understand through most of the novel, and that blindness has tragic consequences.
The second issue I love in this book is the concept of the Speaker for the Dead, the role that Ender Wiggin has taken on in his adulthood. A Speaker's job consists of traveling to places he is called to "speak" the life of someone who has died. These itinerant Speakers come to the person's life completely objectively, and thus they are able to speak the truth about that person--good and bad. The speaker helps the community deal with the person's death by allowing them to see that person completely; all the person's facets, foibles, and fortes are displayed. I found myself thinking that if mopre people read this book, we might have a whole new funereal ritual to deal with.
In short, while of a completely different tone than Ender's Game, Speaker for the Dead brings up some important issues, and it is well worth the time spent in reading it. Invest several days in this book; it deserves them.
--Prudence Plunkett (Prudence_Plunkett@breadnet.middlebury.edu)
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen One of the Best., 13. Juli 2000
Von 
John D. Costanzo "johndc" (Bensalem, PA USA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Very different from its predecessor, this novel has very little warfare or space action. However, it is just as absorbing and suspenseful and probably the better of the two. A story about redemption, forgiveness and the power of love, this was a moving and well-written novel. This (with Ender's Game right behind) is one of the best sci-fi books I have ever read.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Not an adventure story, but a story of humanity, 25. Juli 2000
Unlike Enders War or Enders Shadow, this is not a combat adventure; it is about remorse and redemption. It is about respect for differences so different that you find them abhorent. It is about accepting things as they are and trying to make them better rather than giving up or feeling sorry for yourself. While the "Enders" books are ripe for teens, this book is for adults in that it is more thoughtful and more about preventing wrongful action as opposed to taking aggressive action.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2.0 von 5 Sternen An OK read..., 26. April 2000
...but far from great. After having read Ender's Game and finding it thoroughly engrossing, I naturally proceeded to this sequel with high expectations. I was disappointed. Don't get me wrong--this is still good sf worth your time--but it just can't compare with the depth and excitement of Ender's Game.
Although I liked the book, I could really only give it two stars due to what I consider to be some rather glaring faults:
1) The book is overly preachy and sentimental. The entire plot centers around racial misunderstanding (even the little sub-plots), and the apparent goal of the book is to teach a lesson in social conduct. Frankly, I never much cared for books that depended on a goal or a moral to make sense. The story should stand on its own without being some sort of political forum or propaganda.
2) The time-line just doesn't make a lot of sense. Why is it that there seems to be virtually no technological advancement after 3000 years of continually expanding human society? In the next book you find out that faster-than-light-speed travel is possible, so why haven't humans developed it by then? And why, oh why, would they be using essentially the same computer network for an entire three millenia? Reached its peek? The world of Ender's Game seemed at least marginally plausible, but the world of SFTD just seems to be a construction built around Ender for the purposes of a somewhat shaky plot-line.
3) The plot pivots around one crucial revelation early in the book, which is kept a secret from the reader intentionally as a motivator. More specifically, one of the characters finds out an interesting bit of information and then promptly--conveniently--dies before he gets to tell anyone. Personally, I think this is a particularly cheap plot device that should be kept exclusive to the realm of pulp murder mysteries. It doesn't make you enjoy the book more, it just makes you want to skip to the end to find out what the answer is. To make matters worse, the author drops enough clues early on, that you can guess the answer long before its handed to you, making the rest of the book filler (sentimental and preachy filler, at that).
Even with these faults, I'd still say the book is worth a read, if only as a continuation of an otherwise brilliant series. If you haven't already, though, I'd suggest you start with the first, and best of the series--Ender's Game--before reading this one.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Speaker for the book, 4. März 2000
Von 
S. Christensen "reveuse" (Boise, ID United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Speaker for the Dead is a very different book, in many ways, from Ender's Game. It is more adult in some ways and more cerebral. Be prepared. Come prepared, as well, to let go of preconceptions-- for this is, even more so than Ender's Game, a book about assumptions and all of the unwritten rules that can mean the difference between destruction and redemption.
Don't be surprised when, in this book, Ender starts to take his place in a larger cast of characters. He is now a man, with all of the insight and grim compassion of his youth, a fortune, and a once-burned, twice-wary attitude towards being a part of the human race. Yet the Hive Queen cocoon and the immense guilt it represents spurs him on restlessly from planet to planet. A new chapter in his life opens with the discovery, near the colony of Lusitania, of another new alien race. Once more, aliens murder humans for no apparent reason. Once more, the human response may be murderous. Ender has long since become the mysterious Speaker for the Dead, an itinerant counselor dedicated to telling the kind of brutal truths about the dead people need both to hurt and to heal. But Ender the Xenocide, henceforth infamous, is humanity's only hope for understanding and coping with the "piggies." Saving both races from themselves may be more than even the Speaker can handle. The path to understanding may require courage and almost unendurable sacrifice from Ender and (worse) the people he comes to love. But the fate of humans and piggies alike depends on him, and the Speaker for the Dead, the only advocate left for those he murdered, can't afford to be silenced.
I loved Ender's Game. I adored Speaker for the Dead. It--for the first time--takes Ender out into the world of saving individuals instead of a generic humanity that is almost too abstract to be real. It is different. Ender does not command here, nor does he have any special privileges (except those provided by Jane, the suspiciously intelligent computer program who comes to be the closest companion he has). Any influence he has, as an adult, is based on negotiation and his own ability to win the support of the people he works with. Yet these are the real challenges of human life and endeavour. Ender becomes one a series of people whose decisions may swing the balance. I don't think that makes his contribution any less important.
I love the compassion with which this story is told. The tragic stories of Novinha, Marcos, Libo, and others become transfigured by the simple power of a truth only Ender, as an outsider, can see. And the largest part of that truth is love that comes from Ender's quiet ability to reserve judgement.
The stroke of real genius in this piece may be the piggies, who baffle and annoy readers and generally act like the unpredictable aliens they are. They are still far from truly alien, but they are alien enough to give us a sense of what alien truly is. For if science fiction has a dominating concern, it is our relationship with the strange, the unexpected, the unknown, the other--the aliens of our own kind we work with every day.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen This one was a spectacular sequel to Ender's Game, 12. September 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Speaker for the Dead was a fascinatingly complex story that kept you on your toes. Once again, Orson Scott Card hits the nail on the head when it comes to humanity. The characters are so easy to associate with. Ouanda and her need to fit in, Novinha and her twisted life, even Miro and his unconditional love for Ouanda. I especially loved Jane, who, as with the characters from Ender's Game, I often miss. I have yet to read Xenocide, but I imagine it can't be much better, although I know it will be. This book certainly could bring out the emotions in me! When a young, bitter Novinha finally found a loving home, I was so happy. It felt like sitting in warm sunshine. Then it was wrenched away from her with one horrible death. From their it was all rain till Ender came. That's when the sun starts to peak over the horizon again. And poor Ender. Poor, poor Ender. I still find myself regretting something that he did! His one small misunderstanding with Jane and all of a sudden he was alone again. It still haunts me. I would also like to say, in reference to the review that said, "While the vocabulary may not be for those under 14," that I am only 12 and thouroughly enjoyed and understood the book. Yet another masterpiece by Orson Scott Card. And, to those of you who enjoyed the Ender series, I suggest you also read the Homecoming series (The Memory of Earth, The Call of Earth, The Ships of Earth, Earthfall and Earthborn), another amazing series by Mr. Card. I would, if I could, personally thank Mr. Card for writing these wonderful books. But since I can't, I will thank him here in hopes that he will read this review. Thank you, Orson Scott Card, for deciding to be an author. Thank you very, very much.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Orson Scott Card's best work, 7. August 1999
Von 
J. Angus Macdonald "bibliovore" (Concord, CA United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
As a habit, I avoid best sellers. When I heard there was a sequel to Ender's Game, I shuddered. That book had affected me so deeply, I could not imagine a sequel to it.
This book is in all ways, barring one, superior.
This book reminds me of Ursula LeGuin at her best, and I do not invoke her name lightly. She is one of the few sci-fi authors who understands something of anthropology and, more importantly, the human condition. Card in this one books has levelled with her.
Ender is a far richer and deeper character in this book than he was in Ender's Game. Here he is having to live with his own guilt and the positive and negative aspects of his own legend. He has inspired a cult of sorts, the Speakers of the Dead, people who speak not well of the dead, but realistically. How does one live with such a legacy?
The Piggies are intrinsicly fascinating. They are not small humans. They are not just randomly acting individuals. They act in a consistent, rational manner -- once you know all the peices of the puzzle. Most of these peices are not revealed except with time. Jane is also fascinating. "She" acts in a logical manner as well, but again it is not a HUMAN manner. The Hive Queen is very real and, again, not human. There is a delicate balance inherent in this book.
This book is far superior to Ender's Game, a book which is one of those rare sci-fi novels that I have read twice. It speaks to the core of humanity within us all, it speaks to our fears, our dreams, our hatreds, our prejudices, our nobility, our failings, and our longings. It is not a shoot-em-up. This book is literature, not science fiction. It may be read again with profit. It is not a book about plot and action (thank all the powers!). It is a book about being humnan.
I put a reservation in here, one way in which the book does NOT match Ender's Game. The ending of this book is abrupt and calls out for a sequel. This is quite sad. Ender's Game stands on its own; Speaker for the Dead calls out for a conclusion. Aside from that, this is a superlative book. No, not for everyone; name me a book that is for everyone. But in the end, an intelligent reader will gain much from reading Speaker for the Dead.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 215 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

Speaker for the Dead
Speaker for the Dead von Orson Scott Card (Bibliothekseinband - 11. April 2008)
EUR 13,40
Auf Lager.
In den Einkaufswagen Auf meinen Wunschzettel
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen