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Dune
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43 von 48 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 15. April 2003
Das Buch ist super, da braucht man ja nicht viel dazu zu sagen, auch das Englisch ist gut verständlich, schönes Englischübungsbuch!
Aber nun zur Ausgabe. Das Buch ist schlecht gebunden. Man kann den gebundenen Rand der Seite nur mit Mühe und um die Ecke gucken lesen weil der Rand zu weit bedruckt ist. Außerdem wird im Text öfters für zwei oder drei Zeilen die Schriftgröße gewechselt. Auch nicht sonderlich schön. Fazit also: Das Buch ist inhaltlich unbedingt weiter zu empfehlen. Diese Ausgabe eignet sich aber nur zum durchschmökern, für den Bucherschrank würde ich eine andere Ausgabe bevorzugen.
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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 15. Mai 2000
I know some people who hate the movie and will not touch this book. I know a few who own and love the movie but have never read the book. I have lent DUNE to friends who could get no further than page 20 because it was too "out there" or too difficult, with its array of characters and glossary of made-up terms. But of all the people who have gotten past page 20- I don't know one who doesn't praise it among their absolute favorites. I am no exception.
I love sci-fi but don't read much of it because I prefer fantasy. DUNE feels like a perfect blend of the two. A war of noble houses set in space. Paul Atreides is heir to the duchy- and to say that he is well trained for the job would be an understatement. His father, Duke Leto, is given charge of Arrakis- a hellish desert-world and the sole source of "the spice" which the entire universe needs. A very prestigious assignment, but treachery and peril comes with it. Paul finds himself thrown into the mystery of Dune and its fierce natives, the Fremen. Is he the savior their prophecy speaks of?
I was first blown away by DUNE at the age of 16, and have since considered it "the one to beat". In 8 years, very few books have made me question that judgment: Game of Thrones, Foundation, Lord of the Rings, Ender's Game. I had to reread it to be sure I wasn't just naïve at the time. Was it really THAT great? Absolutely.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 23. Juni 2000
I finished reading all six Dune books on 6/15/00. About a week ago (today is 6/23). It took me a little less than three weeks to read them all (I started Dune on 5/27/00). I rented the movie years back and turned it off after watching it about twenty or thiry minutes. I didn't know what the heck was going on. So, I said to myself that I'd read the book before I rented the movie again. Well I finally did...and then some. I started collecting all six Dune books. When I had them all I began reading Dune. Talk about one cool plot. Dune had it all. One main plot with many subplots underneath. I had to stop reading the book at points so that I could reason everything out before I continued (I LOVED IT). Dune Messiah was pretty good too. It seems to me to be the easiest to understand because its very simple. Children of Dune was okay, but seemed to dragged out because Herbert spent so much time describing Leto II's hallucinations, trances, thoughts, etc. It could of been 200 pages less to get the story across. God Emperor of Dune was really cool too. I love how Herbert describes the changes of Arrakis into Rakis over the millenia. This book does a great job in describing the changes. Heretics of Dune: the most fast paced, action-packed book of the series. This one was a real page turner. Chapterhouse: Dune was an okay story but the book doesn't get interesting until you've read about 300 pages, 3/4 of the book. To me it seems when the Bene Gesserit are in the picture the story slows down quite a bit. I thought there was too much Bene Gesserit philosophy in this book. Overall, how do I rank all six books? Well, the first one, Dune, will have to be my favorite because it is a classic and it is the most intricate book of the series. Herbert really did his homework for this book. It's easy to tell. Book Five is a close second. Book Four is a third. Book two is ranked fourth. And I'll have to say Books three and six tie for last because they seemed the slowest of them all (however, I lean more toward Children of Dune being better because I think Leto II's "transition" was fun to read). Since then I've read two nonfiction books (one on the Alamo) and today I finished Clive Cussler's Serpent. "Now what?" you might ask. Well, I've been wanting to read some more fantasy since high school. The only fantasy I've read are Tolkien's famous four books and C.S. Lewis' "Chronicles of Narnia." Now I'll read Piers Anthony's first Incarnations of Immortality book "On a Pale Horse" and then start reading some Xanth novels. Until next time...
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 1. Juni 2000
Dune is Frank Herbert's masterpiece about Paul Maud'Dib Atreides, descendants of the House Atreus of Homeric fame, and his battles with his arch-enemies, the Harkonnens and, eventually, with the combined forces of the galaxy. The first of six books in an unfinished series--Herbert died before he brought his series to a conclusion--this book is the best of the series.
Set far in the future, after humanity has not only left Earth, but humanity's origin is probably forgotten, the setting for this book is a neo-medieval world of strict castes, nobility and civilized warfare. The basic plot is rather standard: the young hero, Paul must come of age quickly when his father is treacherously killed by agents of the hated rivals. Since Paul loses his rightful throne, he must come of age among the violent indigenous population known as the Fremen.
Although Herbert does write the action scenes well, the plot is not the strong suit of the book--later books in the series have better plots. The strongest part of the book is the theme of religion and politics that runs through the book. Herbert combines many different religions in this future galaxy including Christianity, Islam and various eastern religions.
Herbert sets his hero, Paul, up as a messiah to the planetary population, the Fremen and possibly to the entire galaxy. This path may ultimately lead to a bloody jihad. However, Paul realizes that being a messiah is a dangerous path to take, ultimately ruinous to humanity as later books show. However, Paul's desire for power and the evilness of the alternate leaders, the corrupted by power emperor, the overly secretive female priesthood named the Bene Geserit, the no longer human Guild, and the entirely evil Harkonnens force Paul at every fork in the road to choose the path that leads to his anointing as messiah. Herbert thus creates a hero who is not as virtuous as he seems at first glance.
A final note: as with any good first book in a sci-fi/fantasy series, there is much that remains unexplained in this book. Anyone who says that they understand the entire book is either lying or missed something. Some of the mysteries in this book become explained in later books, and one--the reference to Richese--in the prequel recently co-written by Herbert's son. There is also a great deal of mysticism and musing on the general state of humanity, some of which was, frankly, over my head.
Therefore, if mysticism and unexplained mystery are not your cup of tea, then you should skip this book.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 11. Oktober 1999
I read Dune over three years ago, and naturally I loved it. When I tried to read Dune Messiah I couldn't, I found it boring, and felt that the main character was now too old.
Recently, I reread Dune and continued on through to Dune Messiah, reading both in only two weeks.
Dune Messiah is really just a continuation of the first, and it delivers a 'triumphant tragedy' that is makes a fitting end to the life of a Messiah.
Paul is thirty now (not very old at all), and the Jihad he feared so much is serving the purpose it is supposed to, mingling the genes of humanity and ending the stagnation that existing under the old Imperial system. He has been made both an Emporer and a God, and Alia leads his religion. Pilgrims come in their thousands to Arrakis to experience his Holyness.
However, there are many who plot against him. The Bene Gesserit wish to destroy Paul before he has the chance to establish an Atreides dynasty and regain the precious genes they worked so hard to create. The Fremen long for the old ways when water was precious and Arrakis was theirs. The Bene Tleilax want to gain a kwisatz haderach they can control, and the priests of Maud'Dib's own religion wish to make a martyr of him.
And with his prescience, Paul sees disaster for all man kind unless he follows one set path of the future, but is he willing to pay the price that comes with that future?
The plots that surround Paul are intriguing in their own right, but more intriguing is the development of Paul himself. Or rather, Paul's realisation that what he has created leads to its own stagnation. His powers also develop somewhat, making him an even more realistic Messiah, and finally, it ends in what is in many ways a tragedy, I certainly left this book feeling sad, but it is also in many ways a triumph.
I do not feel that this revelation spoils the book, because it could be sumised because of the Messianic nature of Paul, and because from the very begining of this book, all paths lead to a tragedy in one form or another.
Once I got over the initial depression, I realised that this book perfected the Messiah story begun in Dune, and together they make one of the best works of literature ever. I feel that the two must be considered as one story.
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5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 11. Februar 2000
When I first read Dune, I became obsessed. what a great storyline! It had just about everything I've been looking for in Science-Fiction, such as a really complex plot and an almost complete lack of cliches, among other things.
Then I picked up all the other Dune books (Including Dune: House Atreides) to see if it could accomplish the other impossible: Surviving through about six sequels.
You know what? It couldn't. Instead, I get what is the second worst of the Dune books (the worst being God Emperor). So WHY is it so bad?
First, its the shortest of the series. Its only got like 300 pages while the others have at least 450.
Second, Herbert seems to of lost it. Rather than having a complex story with alot of subtleties like the first one, we have a bunch of unconnected events, most of which are trhere for no apparent reason. For example: Alia fighting a training machine naked, Paul losing his eyes, etc. The Bene Gesserit come up with a plan to get another Kwisatz Haderach... and drop the plan almost immediately, it seems. there is also supposed to be some conspiracy, but that part is breifly wrapped up in the ending.
One problem with Dune as a whole is that the characters never really have definate personality traits. One minute Paul is a hero type, another minute he's a tyrant, and then next he's confused. No consistency at all. Then we have Alia. She was an extremely wise little girl in the first one, but you wouldn't know from Messiah or Children of Dune, in which she seemingly lost all her intellect and now is simply a stock character with emotional problems. If I wanted that, I'd play a Final Fantasy game.
These, my friends, are why I do not like Dune Messiah. As of writng, I've read through God Emperor and started on Heretic (I might as well finish) and can say: read the first Dune, which was GREAT, but ignore the sequels unless you're obsessed.
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6 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 12. November 2002
I count this book as one of the best I've ever read. Herbert just pulls you into the hot, dry world of Arrakis, right to the point where you start to worry about every drop of sweat you loose... If you like fiction that creates a complete "world", this book is a must. It's right up there with Tolkien's Lord of the Rings. The only drawback, if you want to call it that, is: It's to short... you have to leave Dune a lot sooner than you'll like.
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9 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 7. März 2000
The first time a read Dune: Messiah I was more than a little disappointed. By when I re-read Dune I also re-read Dune: Messiah. This was the first time I'd read them back-to-back, and I realized that Dune: Messiah was actually the conclusion to Dune and not a seperate book. As a stand alone book it's barely passable, as a sequal it's worth 3-stars, but as the fourth part of the first book it's a perfect conclusion. Dune was divided into 3 parts (called books) and the last ends with a nice Hollywood ending. Dune: Messiah shows the real conclusion to Paul's Life and the real consequences of his actions in the rest of the book. I think Herbert had to end the first book with Paul on top of the Universe because that is what reader's want, but Messsiah is a more somber look at what it means to have power. After I had re-read Dune and Dune: Messiah, I came across used cliff notes for Dune, and I noticed that it had an essay which treated to two books as one and compared them to a Greek epic pointing out that Greek epics didn't end when the hero was on top, but continued to the end of the hero's life. With the inclusion of Dune: Messiah, Dune now tells us the complete story of Paul's life, and what an incredible story it is. Do not read this book, rather read Dune and this book together.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 1. Juni 2000
This is the second book of the Dune series by Frank Herbert. This book picks up soon after the end of the first book. Paul Maud'Dib Atreides, main character in the first book and now emperor of the galaxy, has to deal with the results of the jihad he reluctantly released on the galaxy as well as the threats to his power from within his own palace. This book is more introspective than the first book, lacking most of the action and focusing instead on the foibles of the various characters and Herbert's musings on religion and politics.
This book makes even more clear than the first book that Paul is not actually a hero, but a flawed man trying to cope with the enormity of his own power and the terrible bloodshed that is being committed in his name. The book is an essay on the dangers of absolute power and of the combination of religious and political power.
Dune Messiah is also a story of the danger of a ruler becoming disaffected from those closest to him. The greatest danger to Paul comes from his disaffected wife. Paul also cuts off his beloved concubine from his decision-making and instead chooses a course which leads him towards personal destruction to save the galaxy. Perhaps Herbert's real message here is that domestic bliss is the key to happiness even for the all-powerful.
Although this book is interesting, it is mainly filler between the masterpiece of Dune and the very good Children of Dune.
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am 4. September 1998
This book is the shortest of all the six in the series. And yet, despite being less wordy, less worldly, less epic, it packs such a punch that I was left mentally reeling after the last chapter.
Paul's almighty victory on Dune hasn't spawned the cosy future that we foresaw for him. His Fremen armies engage in intergalactic jihad; his own Fremen advisors are getting corrupt in all the wealth; all around are conspirators plotting his usurpment; and everywhere he looks with his prescient eye he sees dark nightmares of futures, one of which he must choose to realise.
This book sees the introduction of a new brand of human organisation - the Bene Tleilax, a breed that meddle in genetics and boast their own tricks such as Face Dancers who can shift appearance and behaviour to trick the unwary.
The story is compelling. You find yourself more and more drawn into the horror that unfolds. Again, Herbert has managed to make the book unpredictable at all times, leaving you gasping at one nasty occurence after another.
If you think you might go the whole way and read all six books in the series, then do read this book after Dune. If you don't think you'll manage all six books, it's perhaps best you don't venture beyond Dune, for this book leaves the universe in a sad state compared to the heroic victory at the end of the first tale.
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