Kundenrezensionen


70 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (53)
4 Sterne:
 (10)
3 Sterne:
 (2)
2 Sterne:
 (3)
1 Sterne:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Must-Read!
Professor Clayton M. Christensen's excellent book is a classic of strategy literature. The innovator's dilemma is that doing the right things can lead to failure. Sometimes it is wrong to listen to customers, invest in the highest return opportunities and do all of the things that made a successful company succeed. Clearly written, amply documented, provocative and...
Veröffentlicht am 6. Juli 2005 von Rolf Dobelli

versus
3.0 von 5 Sternen Ein Standardwerk?
Ich habe dieses Buch gekauft, weil es von anderen Autoren immer wieder erwähnt wird. Da will man dann doch mitreden können!

Der Autor illustriert an vielen überzeugenden Beispielen wie neue Technologien (er nennt sie "disruptive") etablierte Firmen zu Fall bringen können, wenn sie "zur rechten Zeit" kommen und auf...
Vor 11 Monaten von Helmut Heller veröffentlicht


‹ Zurück | 1 27 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Must-Read!, 6. Juli 2005
Von 
Professor Clayton M. Christensen's excellent book is a classic of strategy literature. The innovator's dilemma is that doing the right things can lead to failure. Sometimes it is wrong to listen to customers, invest in the highest return opportunities and do all of the things that made a successful company succeed. Clearly written, amply documented, provocative and challenging, this book is indispensable for anyone in business. If it has a shortcoming, it is that it focuses more on the dilemma than on resolving it and it does not offer specific remedial prescriptions. However, Christensen has authored or co-authored two other books that attempt to remedy that deficiency. We heartily recommend this book, which remains the leader of the three. It has the potential to change the way managers think about business - any business.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4.0 von 5 Sternen A new paradigm, 12. August 1998
Von 
Duwayne Anderson (Saint Helens, Oregon) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
We have all seen large, powerful, and successful corporations upstaged and driven out of business by startups using new ideas to grow exponentially and dominate the new business landscape. In his book "The Innovator's Dilemma," Clayton M. Christensen provides a unique and novel theory that explains why entrenched corporations often fail to capitalize on such new ideas, and fall prey to firms with fewer initial resources. With enough data and case histories to make even the skeptic sit up and take notice, Christensen sculpts an argument that demands our attention at once. Step by step he shows that such extinctions come about not necessarily because of arrogance and dogmatism (though these play their parts) but because of the architectural and organizational structures that make good companies good. Like Einstein's theory of relativity, with its concepts of relative time and space, some of Christensen's conclusions seem unintuitive. Others even seem contrary to phy! sical reality. Sometimes it really is wrong to listen to your customers. Sometimes it is better to build a product with low margin and a limited market rather than build a product with high margin and large, virtually guaranteed market.
Christensen builds his thesis upon the notion that technology comes in two broad flavors: sustaining and disruptive. Established product lines use sustaining technology to make incremental improvements. In the language of biology, sustaining technology facilitates gradual Darwinian evolution where incremental improvements coupled with survival of the fittest lead to gradual product improvement. For example, tire manufacturers use sustaining technology to enhance the tread, sidewall, and belt design of automotive tires. Sustaining technology is not trivial, and often involves tremendous expenditures of capital. It is, however, what established companies do best, and these companies have developed very effective organizational and manag! erial structures for dealing with it.
Disruptive technol! ogy, on the other hand, approaches product evolution outside the sustaining envelope. Disruptive technologies typically offer a cheaper solution to a small, often unidentified subgroup. Once established within this small market the disruptive technology evolves through sustaining technology until it eventually satisfies the performance criteria of more traditional markets. When this happens, the disruptive technology bursts onto the scene, attacking the soft underbelly of the established corporations, often with fatalistic consequences. In the parlance of evolutionary biology, disruptive technology is like punctuated evolution; fast with significant changes in the gene pool.
Christensen may be excused for lacking the breadth to discuss similarities between such diverse fields as biology and business management. Still, the book would have benefited immeasurably by a co-author in the field who might have offered greater insight into universal principles governing the evol! ution of complex systems. Repeatedly I found myself going to books by authors such as Richard Dawkins and Stephen Jay Gould to refine my mental image of the multidimensional landscape in which biological organisms and industrial businesses compete for the resources of survival.
The book is well written and persuasive in its arguments. It questions many established ideas and shows that often these ideas fail to apply to disruptive technologies. Often the best corporations are especially susceptible. Defense against disruptive technologies does not come from being smarter and working closer with customers. Paradoxically, working closely with customers and following established rules for corporate investment often make a company more susceptible to harm from disruptive technologies. Companies naturally evolve toward higher-end products with greater margins. Consequently, they find it difficult to enter markets with disruptive technologies that often begin with low margi! ns, are technologically simple, and do not have a clearly d! efined customer base. Such markets are ideal for start-up firms. The author suggests, with several case histories, that one of the best ways for established firms to deal with disruptive technologies is to spin off autonomous organizations that exist within the economic constraints of disruptive technologies.
The author does an excellent job of using examples, drawing most from the disk-drive industry. He also includes examples from the computer, motorcycle, steel, automotive, and earth-moving industries as well. In each case he explains how disruptive technologies emerged and often destroyed well-run companies that were following all the established rules. This drives home the fact that disruptive technologies pose such a great risk precisely because they can destroy industries not only in spite, but because they follow established business practices.
After describing disruptive technologies, with historical cases to illustrate points, the author ends with a case st! udy involving electric vehicles. I found this chapter to be among the weakest, and something of a distraction from the more substantial earlier material. Ironically, in the process of trying to frame electric vehicles as disruptive technology, the author seems to have missed one of the best examples of a disruptive technology, and one that nearly destroyed America's foremost industries: small cars.
Overall, Christensen's work is on a high academic level, though some of the technical material is inconsistent. For example, the ordinates in figures 1.4, 1.5, and 6.1 disagree with each other. The text on page 128 also disagrees with figure 6.1, while the text on page 150 disagrees with figure 7.1. These may be simple examples of typographical errors, but they lessen confidence in the book's technical accuracy. On the positive side, the book has excellent organization and lots of pertinent examples, as well as extensive notes and documentation. The index is also very co! mplete and thorough.
Though Christensen's ideas are new! and radical they are so lucid, logical, and clear that anyone involved in American business cannot afford to ignore them.
Duwayne Anderson
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen OK - so prove your point, 16. Juli 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Starts by turning the idea of "good management" completely on its head. OK - if you can prove it. I'm not sure yet that Christensen has proven his points; I've only read the book twice. But he makes sense. Alot of the roadblocks I've encountered personally in bring innovative practices or technologies into organizations start to make sense in light of Christensen's analysis. Read this book!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


3 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen An excellent explanation of a recurrent strategic problem, 27. April 1998
Von Ein Kunde
The Innovator's Dilemma offers a compelling explanation forwhy large and well-respected firms lose their dominant positionswithin a market, following what Christensen styles as 'disruptive innovation'.
Innovation takes two forms: sustaining and disruptive. Competition in oligopolistic markets is manifest in continuous product improvement, or sustaining innovation. This contrasts with a disruptive innovation, which fundamentally changes a product's nature, offering new functionality, although often at the expense of performance.
Typically, when disruptive innovation occurs, incumbents will reject the new technology; where markets do exist for such innovative products, they tend to be small and offer slim margins. Despite this, the book cites evidence of upstart firms with a low cost configuration and lower profit expectations, which have successfully exploited these marginal opportunities.
Refinement of the innovative product to a standard acceptable to traditional customers coupled with additional functionality enables the niche player to compete head on with established firms. They do so by pricing aggressively. Market incumbents typically respond by quickly incorporating the innovative technology into their products, only to find that they are able to make little impact in the developing new market (weak brand name) and cannibalise their existing customer base at lower margins. A new technology standard has been set.
The few firms that have survived a disruptive innovation have embraced the new technology early and recognised the need for a different approach to operation within the market. This demands a different corporate mentality and ultimately, organisational design, which is only possible by establishing a virtually autonomous and sometimes geographically separate subsidiary. Eventually, this may reverse acquire the parent.
The Innovator's Dilemma provides an interesting perspective on a seemingly recurrent problem. It does so in a fashion that is both insightful and easy to read. The main themes in the book are qualified with numerous examples and some rudimentary analysis, whilst avoiding being unduly repetitive.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Blueprint for Your Dot.Com is At Hand, 8. Mai 2000
Von 
Paul Frandano (Reston, Va. USA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
In the space of a few months, I've bumped into a half-dozen corporate planners who've told me, "Drop everything you're doing and run--do not walk--to your nearest bookseller and get Clayton Christenson's The Innovator's Dilemma." Investigating further, I found that, in the industry press, Christenson's book is viewed as The New Gospel. Now having read the thing, I can see what all the fuss is about; by the final chapter, the counterintuitive idea that (under clearly specified conditions) "rigorous pursuit of your customer's interest can indeed sink your firm" seems as inevitable as the sunrise. Moreover, reading Christenson now, as Wall Street lurches through the Era of Dot.Com/Madness, it's easy to believe the book, and Chapter Nine in particular, has served a hefty percentage of recent internet start-ups as a template for mapping the market and assessing whether the technology offered is sufficiently disruptive. (Christenson's use of the term "technology" is process-related and more than just the latest widget). As a public sector drone, I was further impressed that Christenson's analytic approach is broadly, if metaphorically, applicable to a range of organizations--non-profit, non-commercial, public--trying to keep from being overrun by the forces of change. Some critics have pooh-poohed Christenson's analysis as old wine in a new bottle--"what's the big deal about successful firms having difficulty dealing with the low end of their markets?" etc.--but the lucid writing, clear plan, well-sprung analytic framework (particularly the integration of "value networks" and "technology trajectories"), and compelling marshaling of case material make this an enjoyable, often revelatory, and, yes, innovative dissection of how great firms become undone by new technologies.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Best business book I've ever read. Period., 26. Juni 1998
In Jan/Feb '95, the author, Clayton Christensen coauthored a seminal paper in the Harvard Business Review called "Disruptive Technologies...". For 3 years now I, my coworkers, and my managers have passed that paper around and watched organizations succeed and fail following EXACTLY the strategies described in that '95 paper. Imagine my delight that Christensen has now published (and expanded) his ideas in a book. The book contains incredibly thorough research, is very well written, and is applicable to a wide range of businesses. Make sure you read the whole book - there are gems scattered from cover to cover. Pay particular attention to the concept he calls 'value networks' - and how difficult it is for an organization to change these.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen "Watch your Bottom", could be the subtitle of this book., 19. Oktober 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Clayton Christensen offers a spellbinding account of how inferior technologies can overwhelm and displace. If you ever wondered about the similarities between sailing ships, steam shovels and disk drives, you must read this book. If you are a productline planner, strategist, venture capitalist, then read this book (unless you are my competitor). Mr Christensen also theorizes upon, as well as chronicles tactics to harness innovation. If any "sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic", then any "suffiently disruptive technology is indistinguishable from the mundane", might be a thesis of this work. Another might be "The evils of listening to your customers!"
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Excellent analysis of growing industries and opportunities, 20. August 1997
Von Ein Kunde
This book provides an insightful analysis of growth opportunities provided by technological breakthroughs. It allows the reader to understand how the capacities that led firms to success may also lead to eventual failure. In addition, it explains why firms often fail to pursue new technologies that do not serve their immediate customer base and how that inaction may result in their demise.
The book is lucidly written and provides ample examples to support the hypothesis. It is one of the few business books today that provides new insight into exploiting technological innovation.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Good analysis of technology vs. management, 17. Juli 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Original thinking that helps us understand some of the dynamics of technological progress and explains why the Davids continue to beat the Goliaths. A must for the paranoid (like Andy Grove) who want to survive. The book shows again that traditional best practices in management are good at managing incremental product improvement, but have enormous difficulty in dealing with truly unusual developments. The disruptive technologies are not the Nobel Prize-winning inventions but initially inferior technologies that are easy to overlook.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen This is a great book for budding revolutionaries!, 24. Januar 1999
This is a great book because it points out why, and how, opportunities continually open up in markets. It tells large companies where they are vulnerable. It also points out to budding revolutionaries ways to attack a large company. I also knew that it was hard for a high-end company to attack the low end or middle market and now I know why. I say that this book is an instant classic. One of my top ten business books.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 27 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

Innovator's Dilemma: When New Technologies Cause Great Firms to Fail (Management of Innovation and Change)
EUR 20,95
Auf Lager.
In den Einkaufswagen Auf meinen Wunschzettel
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen