Kundenrezensionen


7 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (4)
4 Sterne:
 (3)
3 Sterne:    (0)
2 Sterne:    (0)
1 Sterne:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

11 von 13 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen "How do you feel?", 6. Juli 2006
Von 
Stephen A. Haines (Ottawa, Ontario Canada) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Among the many snappy one-liners spicing the "Star Trek" films, this one, issued by a computer to the resurrected Mr Spock, stands out particularly. Then, it seemed a poor joke. Now, a computer posing such a question is no longer a speculative idea. With many studies of the brain's signal intensity of our outlook on various topics, the question, even if posed indirectly, is valid. The problem, as Gilbert explains, is that we really don't have a secure answer. "Happiness", he reminds us, is a complex emotion with countless factors weighing in on how we view it. In this intriguing study, the author brings a wealth of experience and the work of many researchers into this examination of our various ways of considering what makes us "happy".

While this book asks serious questions, recounting how cognitive sciences have revealed some of the answers, this is hardly a ponderous academic study. Gilbert's lively wit ameliorates some of the grim episodes he must use to impart how science has considered these issues. How can a man wrongfully imprisoned for thirty-seven years declare his incarceration "a glorious experience"? More significantly, who are we to judge his viewpoint as "impossible" or "misguided"? Gilbert acknowledges that most of us would view askance such a judgement of a legal mis-judgement. He also contends that both viewpoints are correct - if considered in their actual frame of reference. Our problem is that we have our own views of what comprises happiness, and projecting it on how others should feel is an error. Compounding that situation is that our own view of our own happiness is likely out of whack.

One of the major points this author proposes is that any attempt we make to forecast what will bring us happiness will almost surely prove false. Part of the reason for this comes from what studies have shown the brain to be doing "behind our backs". Because the multitude of sensory inputs and body function regulation roles keep the brain so busy, it often has to make judgements based on incomplete information. Among the choices it faces, the mind may settle on something positive whether or not factual or complete supportive information is available. That is what our "consciousness" perceives and considers valid. Even new information may not dislodge this choice from our consideration. How "individual" this selection process is has been borne out by studies of twins - even conjoined twins, who certainly ought to reflect common thoughts for what gives pleasure. It is clear, therefore, that judging our own happiness or that of others is fraught with the likelihood of error. Delusion about what brings happiness isn't merely a possibility. It's fundamental to how we handle values.

The other side of this coin is why our approach to happiness appears to be a human universal. The mechanisms that lead us to consider happiness arose with the enlargement of our frontal cortex beginning some two million years ago. Although that sounds like a long time, it's an "eyeblink in the evolutionary time scale". The brain's new capacities gave us the power to imagine. "Imagination", Gilbert argues, is the ability to fabricate a mental image of the future. We have an ability no other creature possesses. We can ponder options, imagine scenarios, consider various paths to follow. We can thus consider what will make us happy. Regrettably, we are unable to choose accurately, because that same cognitive power grants the brain the means to select ways and means with no real capacity for choosing reliably.

Gilbert's conclusion to all the research he's summarised is necessarily vague. After all, we aren't dealing with physical trauma or human values in this survey. The topic is how we view our wishes and desires. It's not the sort of thing we feel is normally amenable to analysis or correction. It's a very individual view. Or is it? Gilbert finds that the multitude of "self-help" books might have something to say to us after all. They reflect, he says, a set of things we all hold dear and wish to achieve. While we all treasure our uniqueness, it turns out that people in similar circumstances pretty much strive for similar aims. There are no formulas to follow to achieve happiness. We can only imagine what we would like to have or be, and can only reflect on past endeavours and rewards gained. Our big brains, he concludes, with all its powers, can best be used to allow us to understand what makes us stumble into happiness. [stephen a. haines - Ottawa, Canada]
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


6 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Zu lesen wie ein Roman, 23. Oktober 2010
Von 
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Stumbling on Happiness (P.S.) (Taschenbuch)
Das ist das erste wissenschaftliche Buch, das es geschafft hat, dass ich es mit Suchtfaktor lese wie einen guten Roman.
Es wird nie langweilig, die dargebrachten Themen sind leicht verständlich ohne oberflächlich zu sein und wer sich noch genauer über eine Sache informieren möchte, kann das im Anhang tun.
Dieses Buch ist außerdem so witzig geschrieben, dass man schon alleine deshalb gerne weiterliest.

Für mich sowohl inhaltlich als auch vom Schreibstil eines der besten Bücher, die ich seit Langem gelesen habe.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Was macht Glücklich?, 18. Dezember 2009
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Stumbling on Happiness (Vintage) (Taschenbuch)
In lockerem und witzigem Schreibstil räumt Daniel Gilbert mit vielen Vorurteilen über das Glücklichsein auf. dabei vermittelt er jede Menge psychologisches Fachwissen auf einfache Weise. Ich habe das Buch sehr gerne gelesen und viel dabei gelernt. Manchmal hat das Buch seine Längen, wenn er mich von etwas überzeugen will, was ich aber schon längst so sehe. Besonders positiv ist mir aufgefallen, dass er (gerade für einen Psychologen) sehr logisch argumentiert.

Ob man nach der Lektüre glücklicher ist? Ich weiß es nicht. Auf jeden Fall weiß man danach sehr viel über die eigene Gefühlswelt und dürfte viele Zwänge im Leben gar nicht als so dramatisch betrachten.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting, 25. Mai 2014
Von 
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Stumbling on Happiness (Kindle Edition)
Good book with a lot of interesting background information.
But not very much helpful information what to do to rise your level of happiness.
Anyhow - a good read and my recommendation.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen It helped me to better understand myself and others, 14. April 2013
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Stumbling on Happiness (Kindle Edition)
This book is about more than happiness. It helped me to understand how our brains work, and explained many puzzles about the human behavior. I do now better understand myself and others.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Warum man eher über sein Glück stolpert, als es selber gezielt herbeizuführen, 1. September 2012
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Stumbling on Happiness (Vintage) (Taschenbuch)
Dieses Buch ist keine Anleitung zum Glücklich sein. Wie der Autor in seinem Vorwort selber beschreibt, geht es hier vielmehr darum, die neuesten Erkenntnisse der Wissenschaft zu erfahren, wie gut sich unser Gehirn seine eigene Zukunft vorstellen kann und wie und wie gut es vohersagen kann, welche der möglichen Zukunften uns am glücklichsten machen wird. Man ahnt schon, dass unser Gehirn sehr schlecht darin ist, die besten Bedingungen für eine glückliche Zukunft vorherzusagen, so dass man eher über sein Glück stolpert, als es wirklich selber gezielt herbeizuführen.

Der Autor ist Professor für Psychologie in Harvard und kennt sich in dem Metier aus. Er beschreibt viele wissenschaftliche Versuche, die zu seinen Schlussfolgerungen geführt haben, was seine Thesen sehr überzeugend macht. Ausserdem hat er einen unglaublichen Sprachwitz und wirklich originelle und überraschende Vergleiche und Formulierungen. Nach etwa 30 Seiten dachte ich daher auch, dass dies ein sicheres Fünf-Sterne Buch ist. Dass es dann doch nur vier Sterne wurden, liegt daran, dass das Buch seine Längen hat, ich hin und wieder Passagen zweimal lesen musste (was auch daran liegen mag, dass ich kein native speaker bin) und dass der Sprachwitz manchmal ein Selbstzweck zu sein scheint.

Dennoch: ein wirklich interessantes und kluges Buch.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5 von 21 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Philosopie und Psychologie, 14. September 2006
Von 
Stephan Wiesner (Switzerland) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(VINE®-PRODUKTTESTER)   
Das Buch (als Hörbuch übrigens sehr zu empfehlen) philosphiert über das Glück und Glücklichsein. Gefällt mir persönlich überhaupt gar nicht!

Gut hingegen ist die Ansammlung von psychologischen Experimenten, welche Zitiert und erklärt werden. Viele Alltagsdinge und Verhalten an einem selbst werden einem so verständlich(er).

Als Hörbuch "nebenbei" gehört war es gut, als Buch hätte ich es jedoch nicht zu ende gelesen.

Nutzt es was? Wie definiert man das bei einem solchen Buch? Auf die Frage, ob ich mein Leben jetzt anders sehe oder Lebe muss ich jedenfalls nein sagen. Oder darf ich das sagen? Aber jetzt fange ich auch an zu philosophieren...
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

Stumbling on Happiness (Vintage)
Stumbling on Happiness (Vintage) von Daniel Gilbert (Taschenbuch - 20. März 2007)
EUR 11,90
Auf Lager.
In den Einkaufswagen Auf meinen Wunschzettel
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen