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5.0 von 5 Sternen Thrilling
Some professors may enjoy dissecting this book, making it appear to be one of the most complex in the history of literature, but basically this is a story that is as simple as a fairy tale and as exciting as a thriller: Salesman Gregor Samsa wakes up and finds himself changed into an enormous insect.
Kafka tells the ensuing troubles with a perfectly straight face...
Veröffentlicht am 19. Juli 2000 von Manuel Haas

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3.0 von 5 Sternen NOW WHO WOULDN'T WANT TO BE TRANSFORMED INTO A GIANT INSECT
I was very eager to read to book. I think it might be fair to say that this is probably Kafka's most referred to book. To me the story starts out great,I was even laughing at the sitution Samsa found himself in. But I'd say 20 or 25 pages into the book it actually gets boring! The whole sitution starts to get "stale". You begin not to care about the character...
Veröffentlicht am 25. Januar 2000 von Alex Udvary


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5.0 von 5 Sternen Thrilling, 19. Juli 2000
Some professors may enjoy dissecting this book, making it appear to be one of the most complex in the history of literature, but basically this is a story that is as simple as a fairy tale and as exciting as a thriller: Salesman Gregor Samsa wakes up and finds himself changed into an enormous insect.
Kafka tells the ensuing troubles with a perfectly straight face. In contrast to all those magic realists, he departs from what may happen any day in only one particular, which makes the story all the more haunting. Who has ever identified with an insect? The difficulties Gregor faces are told from his point of view: his family don't believe it's him, he cannot communicate, they try to get rid of him etc. This heartbreaking novella can be enjoyed even by twelve-year-olds. This is definitely the book you should start with if you want to have a go at Kafka.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen One of the most significant allegories of modern literature, 28. Mai 2000
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Ryan Werstuik (Pennsylvania, United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
Kafka's "The Metamorphosis" is one of the most complex titles in 20th century literature. Despite it's short length, it has a seemingly infinite number of levels on which it can be interpreted. Whether read as social condemnation, a symbolic autobiography, or anywhere inbetween, every reader can learn something not only about his world but about himself. In only a few pages, Kafka has epitomized the purpose of literature. Although definately not "escape literature," I highly recommend "The Metamorphosis" to anyone interested in stretching their mind while digging downward into the infinate depths of this novella's meaning.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Kakfa's fairytales endure, 5. September 1997
Von Ein Kunde
This is my favorite work by Kafka, and is definately a perfect introduction to one of the most important writers of the century. I consider this book softer, less angular than some of his other books. There is enormous tension and angst, to be sure, but for me the most overwhelming sense from this book is intense pathos and longing. Samsa is not struggling against secret societies, invisable rules, or seemingly nonexistant yet impenetratable barriers; instead he is struggling against his own form, his own identity. He has given everything yet becomes repulsive; people fear and hate HIM. The passages with and about his sister and her music are especially touching. Kafka's modern fairytales are perhaps the most fascinating pieces of literature written this century. I encourage everyone to read them; don't be scared off by their reputation. I wish Kafka wasn't so ghetto-ized to the world of universities and colleges
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Endlessly moving, 25. Mai 2000
Gregor Samsa awakes one day to find that he has turned into a giant cockroach: on the surface it is a simple tale, below the surface it is infinitely deep. As a symbol of alienation, Gregor evokes the richest archetypes of the collective unconscious. One can't help but feel an intimate empathic connection to Gregor. The ending is bitterly ironic. Not at all the dry, dull read one expects from "classic" literature. Metamorphosis is bursting with dark humor and rich pathos. Highest recommendation!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Change is what we need, 15. Mai 2000
This book is a triumph. Kafka has created, in his most famous piece, a work that is almost poetic in its prose and yet remains succinctly digestible. The metaphor is obvious, Gregor works and works to keep his incapable family in comfort with only the faintest dreams of seeking his own fulfilment. However, as we know he becomes the embodiment of his vocation transforming overnight into a giant insect.
The scene is set from the first sentence of the book and as we struggle to decide whose cause to support, we are swept away in a delicately woven shroud of fantasy and reality, the family's struggle is painfully real, Gregor's change cannot be reasoned, yet it all becomes tangible. The family descends into chaos as Gregor loses his job and the family bear disgust for this creature, yet we later realise that every member of the family has been developing and growing without ever losing their stride. The genius of the book is that given the obvious metamorphosis, we fail to see until later in the book that the metamorphosis is a gradual process undergone by the family as a whole. They must work to support themselves, Mr Samsa once again can assert his position at the head of the household, Gregor's sister is becoming a woman. Those who are not part of the change are swiftly removed from influence, and we are left with a cacophony of voices, that somehow sing the same song.
We are also left with the idea that his sister, somehow the sanest, most competent member of the remaining family could be seen perhaps as a queen bee to contradict the worker embodied by Gregor. He dreams only of sending her to the academy where she can learn to play the violin she loves, and he saves in secret to surprise her with this fantastic gift beyond his means that he is never able to give. From the start she weeps for Gregor before his plight is known, and soon takes responsibilty for him as she metamorphoses from a girl to a grown woman. As she becomes the queen she is left with the direction of Gregor's fate, and begins to see his plight in pragmatic rather that emotional terms.
This is a fantastic book that demands to be read again and again. Each time another gradual metamorphosis reveals itself from the story. If you read between the lines, you still have to read between those lines, yet Metamorphosis is held together by the sheer completeness of the imagery.
This book is remarkably deep for such a lightly written piece, and short at only 79 pages (in my edition), however it is verging on a work of art. It is a piece, not a story, and leaves you energised. It is testament to the genius of Kafka that he allegedly wrote this in one day.
5 stars coming your way, Franz!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A haunting story, 24. Oktober 1999
Von Ein Kunde
"When Gregor Samsa got up in the morning, he found himself transformed into a gigantic insect..." begins Kafka's famous Metamorphosis. I believe this is the most famous first opening sentence in twentieth century literature. In the whole story, Kafka took no interest in explaning why Gregor was transformed into a gigantic insect. Instead, there are detail descriptions of the change of his life, his circumstances and relationship between him and the external world after his transformation: how he regressed into an insectile existence and how he alienated himself from his family. His sister brought food scrapes on a piece of newspaper, he was bound in his room and his father even threw apples at him after he ventured out of his room resulting in his fatal injury. Can anyone criticize Gregor's family of the way they treat him? Whether it is right or not,I believe one of the main themes in the story is when you become a gigantic insect, you do behave like a gigantic insect and the world will treat you as a gigantic insect. The full horror of this story sinks in when nearly everyone can be transformed into a gigantic insect at anytime; like phyical and mental illnesses, accidents and injuries, degenerative and terminal illnesses, etc. There will be no explanation given no matter how unfair this transformation is done to an individual person. Finally, Gregor believed that it was reasonable for him to die for the best interest of his family. I felt so sad after I finished the book. Is everyone undergoing a process of metamorphosis either slowly or quickly?
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Welcome to the Dollhouse--You Cockroach, you, 17. August 1997
This is the stuff Gen-X existentional angst was built on--the story of a guy who wakes up one morning as a giant bug.

The beginning was pretty funny--it describes how Gregor Samsa (whose last name, critics say, is cryptogram for Kafka) tries to get up in the morning and try to convince his mother, father, and sister that he's okay, although he isn't. Pretty darn hard to get out of bed if all your legs won't do what you wanna do. When they find out that he's turned into bug, they are just a *little* bit scared. Just a little. Okay, all right, the mother and sister and father are out of their wits and the newly bugged-out Gregor is banished to the attic. This is where the humor stops and the story plunges into deep, deep sadness. The whole family all but nearly alienate him, and Gregor, who was once fairly self-sufficient, must now rely on his *parents* for food and shelter. The ending is heart-breaking, but then takes a rather ambiguous turn, as the parents see Gregor's sister in a new light. Nice little story for those who are off Prozac. Or maybe it's a nice little story for Nicholas Cage's appetite.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Strange, interesting, and orginal., 15. März 1999
I have to say; of all the books that I've read, Kafka's work is some of the most original and interesting. Not just because of the issues that are found underlying within the story, but the way it is presented. Gregor's transition from being able to support the family financially, to becoming unable to support himself is both comic and tragic. I've only read it twice, and still don't understand some of the social undertones in the story, which is why I plan on reading it more in the future. It's not exactly a free flowing river like "On the Road" by Kerouac; it is one of the things in life that needs to be examined over and over again to fully understand what's really happening. I'll bet some of the blatant responses dribbling from other "readers" about how slow and boring it is, haven't even bothered to give the book a second chance.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Strange, interesting, and orginal., 15. März 1999
I have to say; of all the books that I've read, Kafka's work is some of the most original and interesting. Not just because of the issues that are found underlying within the story, but the way it is presented. Gregor's transition from being able to support the family financially, to becoming unable to support himself is both comic and tragic. I've only read it twice, and still don't understand some of the social undertones in the story, which is why I plan on reading it more in the future. It's not exactly a free flowing river like "On the Road" by Kerouac; it is one of the things in life that needs to be examined over and over again to fully understand what's really happening. I'll bet some of the blatant responses dribbling from other "readers" about how slow and boring it is, haven't even bothered to give the book a second chance.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A statement for Social Reform, 25. November 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Kafka's Metamorphosis is one of the most powerful books ever written. Kafka's profound story of the external transfiguration of Gregor Samsa not only puts forth questions of humanity's oscillatory behaviour, it also tells of Kafka's frustration of his industrialised world. Gregor Samsa is already a cockroach inside before his physical metamorphosis; it takes his devolution into barbaric simplicity for him to learn to become a man. Inversely, his family's former love and humanity is torn asunder when they find themselves cast into the commercial world. Kafka's statements on the conditions of his world make this book a must read. Yet what truly makes this a masterpiece is that so many messages are interwoven into Kafka's grotesquely comic tale of a man's mental metamorphosis; Kafka's writing was so far ahead of time that it surpasses ours.
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The Metamorphosis
The Metamorphosis von Franz Kafka (Taschenbuch - 20. Juli 2004)
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