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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen For the dedicated New Economy professional only
It seems everyone with a modicum of business acumen has written (or is writing) a book analyzing the Information Age. Shapiro and Varian write theirs in the context of classic economic principles, not surprising given they are both economists. They pick out the small set of economic theories that easily translate to current business trends. As a result, this book is...
Veröffentlicht am 22. Juni 2000 von Michael G

versus
2.0 von 5 Sternen Information Rules Is Good If You are A PhD Economics Student
My best advice for anyone even thinking about buying this book is .... click on and delete the wasteful and useless business concepts this book presents. Shapiro and Varian have some good "economics classroom" ideas and if that's where you do business the book is ok. But, if you are doing business in the "real world classroom", as most of us are,...
Am 17. November 1998 veröffentlicht


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4.0 von 5 Sternen For the dedicated New Economy professional only, 22. Juni 2000
Von 
Michael G (San Francisco, CA United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy (Gebundene Ausgabe)
It seems everyone with a modicum of business acumen has written (or is writing) a book analyzing the Information Age. Shapiro and Varian write theirs in the context of classic economic principles, not surprising given they are both economists. They pick out the small set of economic theories that easily translate to current business trends. As a result, this book is interesting to two groups of people: former econ majors and New Economy professionals. If you are both, great. (I'm both.) If you are neither, this book may be fairly dry, and not nearly as approachable as lifestyle books like "The New New Thing" or "Nudist on the Late Shift". Just so you know, this book is rapidly becoming a staple on undergrad econ reading lists.
If you are really, truly into the Information Economy, you will find their spin on our overanalyzed market segment is worth reading. Otherwise, your eyes will glaze over around chapter 3. Econ students, start making coffee in the middle of chapter 2.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen information does rule, 29. Juni 2000
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Buddy Del Rosario "buds" (city of angels) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy (Gebundene Ausgabe)
if you still have not picked up a book on the new economy, this should be your first read. in this book, the authors stress often that although technology changes quite rapidly, economic principles do not and ignoring these can be quite detrimental. information is an experience good but how does one engulf it all? the nobel prize winning economist herber simon sums it quite clearly when he states that " a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention." it is not longer a question of information access but information overload.knowledge of principles such as pricing, versioning, and lock-in discussed in the book will give the e-ntreprenuer the competitive edge.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Single best book on the New Economy, 26. April 2000
Von 
Eric Antonow (Palo Alto, CA United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy (Gebundene Ausgabe)
After more than two years consulting and studying in this field I can recommend no single better book to understand the core concepts behind information driven businesses. Mr. V has written a solid, thoughtful distillation that cannot be overlooked if you are going to open your mouth on this subject. It withstands the scrutiny of both hard-core academics and practical business people (at least those who 'get' the underlying principals). The next three good 'New Economy' books don't hold a candle to this one.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen An Excelent Guide if You Want to do biz e-way, 3. Mai 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy (Gebundene Ausgabe)
An excellent book although not for the general public . You must be an economist to like it . It gives many useful tips backed up by examples from the old traditional economy on how to strategically set direction for your e-biz. I especially liked the debate about network economics exemplified by Metcalf law on network value. Not all chapters are equally interesting but its definitely a great book my email: ramconsulting@usa.net
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Simply brilliant, 25. März 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy (Gebundene Ausgabe)
I heard the lecture from Mr. Varian @ University of Washington, and it made me borrow this book from the library. the book is wonderful. It explains almost everything currently happening in Silicon Valley or in the past. As long as I read the book, I see things that very obvious, I see the "rules" of information technology. Finally, I decided to buy the book and I will read over and over again. Strongly recommended!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Understanding the network effect, 26. Dezember 2004
Von 
Stephan Haux (Speyer, Germany) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy (Gebundene Ausgabe)
When Graham Bell developed the telefone he created more than just a brilliant piece of technology. He not only changed the live of millions of people by enabling communication over large distances.
With the Telefone a paradigm in business occured: network effects. The principal is quite simple to get: The more telefone there are on the world, the more value does the one you are having provides to you.
With the upcoming of information technologies in particular electronic media and software this principal is carrying much further. "Information Rules" explains just that. After reading you will understand how it is possible for Microsoft to sell software for 12 Billion US-$ a year and make 10 Billion profit. You will understand the importance of market power and standards as they occur in the information industry adn their incredible effects.
This book explains this new paradigm that is taking over more and more of the economy in clear words, with lots of relevant and often surprising examples.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Ein professionelles leserfreundliches Buch, mit Witz...., 10. November 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Es ist klar kein Lehrbuch, aber es ist ein Buch das die Chance hat so etwas wie der Porter II zu werden.
Firmen werden analysiert, in ihrer Eigenschaft als Teil von Netzwerken. Die Vorteile die sie sich verschaffen können durch bigger=better und lock ins, werden anhand von vielen Beispielen aufbereitet. Es wird so dargestellt, wie sich eine Firma in der Netzwerkökonomie der folgenden Jahre optimal positioniert.
Ich finde ein gutes Einsteigerbuch in die Materie das Lust aus mehr macht was Netzwerke angeht, und ein Buch, dass Leben in eine sonst eher trockene Materie der Economy of Networks bringt, indem so viele Beispiele verwendet werden.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Grundlagenwerk für die Internetgesellschaft, 12. Juli 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Dieses Buch ist das Standardwerk zum Verständnis der Informationsgesellschaft und der entstehenden Internet-Ökonomie. Themen wie Electronic Commerce sind derzeit in aller Munde und werden in einer Unmenge von Publikationen analysiert, viele der dort beschriebenen grundlegend neuen Gesetzmäßigkeiten scheinen jedoch aus diesem Buch entnommen. Wenn nicht, so werden sie zumindest hier sehr umfassend und systematisch behandelt, ohne den Beiklang des Sensationellen.
Was dieses Buch so besonders macht, ist die wissenschaftliche Herangehensweise. Die Autoren versuchen nicht, in marktschreierischer Weise ein völlig neues ökonomisches Regelwerk aufzustellen, sondern belegen, wie schon seit langem existierende Prinzipien durch die neuen Möglichkeiten der Informationstechnologie und Vernetzung neue Facetten bekommen. Sie legen damit eine solide Grundlage zum Verständnis der veränderten Gesetzmäßigkeiten und geben Ansatzpunkte, wie Unternehmer in diesem neuen Kontext strategisch agieren können.
Im einzelnen gehen die Autoren zunächst auf die Besonderheiten im Umgangs mit Informationsgütern ein: Preisstrategien, Differenzierung (Versioning) und Schutzrechte. Dann analysieren sie Konzepte wie Wechselkosten, Lock-in, Netzwerkeffekte, Positives Feedback, Kompatibilität und Standards. Sie untermauern die Konzepte jeweils durch anschauliche Beispiele, teilweise auch aus der "industriellen Vergangenheit" und geben konkrete Hinweise zur Ausgestaltung von Strategien. Zuletzt widmen sie sich der Rolle des Staates und der Gesetzgebung in der Informationsgesellschaft.
Dieses ist sehr empfehlenswert sowohl für Praktiker als auch für Wissenschaftler, da es sowohl ökonomische Theorien aufgreift und weiterentwickelt als auch konkrete praktische Handlungsanweisungen gibt. Die Autoren beschreiben den Inhalt ihres Buches selber sehr treffend als "the cool stuff, the material they didn't get to when you studied economics". Ich hoffe, das die Inhalte dieses Buches in naher Zukunft sehr wohl ein fester Bestandteil des wirtschaftswisschenschaftlichen Studiums sein werden. (Dies ist eine Amazon.de an der Uni-Studentenrezension.)
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4.0 von 5 Sternen A Retrospective of Key Milestones in the Evolution of IT, 11. Mai 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy (Gebundene Ausgabe)
The authors provide a very interesting retrospect of some of the key milestones in the evolution of Information Technology and, more interestingly, they do it from several complementary perspectives: historical, political, social, legal, as well as technical.
If only for the number, the variety, and the significance of its examples, the Book is well worth reading. The Book is a reminder that the "breadth" of Information Technology is more than just conventional computer systems, as many of us have come to think of, and that the "depth" of Information Technology is more than just the last 50 years or less. The authors remind us that Information Technology existed well before the advent of computer systems and the age of digital recording of information in general.
The authors refer to companies and products that most of us have already heard of but they go one step beyond the mere presentation of these examples, they do analyze them and they propose explanations of the underlying principles behind the successes and the failures of the former as well as of the battles that took place.
The Book is well-written, has a good flow, shows objectivity, and provides useful backward references as well as summaries of lessons learned throughout. The authors successfully translate the lingo of Economics into layman's terms. Reading the Book is like taking a refresher class in Economics applied to Information Technology.
The one lesson learned, after reading the Book, could well be: "look back in history and look around in the various areas of Information Technology if you want to better understand what the future might hold in one specific area of Information Technology".
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Prescient rules for winning in the Internet economy, 21. Dezember 1998
Von 
hypermark (San Francisco, CA USA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy by Carl Shapiro and Hal Varian takes a look at the emerging Internet economy, and argues compellingly that traditional economics still apply in evaluating the Yahoos of our generation. In fact, history provides a pretty good guide for evaluating network-centric businesses. One only has to look at the evolution of the railroad, telephone and television networks. The book reaches some interesting conclusions, summarized here:
1.Information is costly to produce but inexpensive to reproduce (i.e., has a high fixed cost but a low marginal cost). This translates to a lot of latitude, challenges and opportunities in coming up with pricing models and corresponding versions of a product to create both the maximum revenue opportunities and establish the largest number of members of the product's network of users. Also, given the low cost of reproduction, it stands to reason that protecting intellectual property is a key determinant of information good's economic success. 2.Information is an "Experience Good," which is to say that customers must use and experience the product to put value on it. One only has to think about Netscape's initial success giving away the browser to see the value of leveraging the "experience" factor. 3.Products that can achieve "lock-in" will benefit from the "switching costs" that preclude customers from switching-over to competing (even superior) solutions. In other words, products that get a user to commit time, knowledge and/or resources to them are likely to continue to be used even in the face of superior products given the cost of switching to alternative products. An interesting point the book makes is to look at lock-in and switching costs not only in terms of your product, but your collaborators and complementors as well. 4.Fundamental to success is leveraging the power of positive feedback, or network effects. What this means is that the value of your product is a function of the total number of vendors, partners and endusers participating in its "network."
Some specific strategic considerations:
1.Versioning: create different versions of your products tailored to the need of different groups of customers. This allows customers to select the version that best meets their needs and enables you to pick up as wide a base of customers as possible (e.g., Quicken, Quicken Deluxe, QuickBooks). Specific mechanisms for accomplishing same are: delay, user interface, convenience, image resolution, speed of operation, flexibility of use, capability, features and functions, comprehensiveness, annoyance, support. 2.The total cost of switching = cost the customer bears + costs the new supplier bears. Types of lock-in: contractual commitments, durable purchases, brand-specific training, information and databases, specialized suppliers, search costs, loyalty programs. 3.The lock-in cycle: brand selection, product sampling, entrenchment, lock-in. Needless to say, the more successful you are at getting customers more locked-in to your products (e.g., taking advantage of proprietary features), the more successful you will be in keeping customers at peak prices. 4.Leveraging your installed base: focus on selling complimentary products (Micorsoft), selling access to your installed base (Yahoo), setting differential prices to achieve lock-in (Adobe's Photo Deluxe for beginners is a low-end product that is often bundled with scanners and gets users hooked on product. Many ultimately upgrade to full version of product, Adobe Photoshop), exploiting first-mover advantages (Ticketnmaster locks customers into long-term contracts). 5.Market adoption dynamics in positive feedback markets tend to evolve along the lines of an S-curve, with the initial adoption period being flat (while the market winner is in doubt). Once an apparent market winner emerges, the adoption rates takes off dramatically continuing until market saturation. In other words, popularity in positive feedback markets is the ultimate metric of success. Hence, perception becomes reality in these markets. Those expected to win in the market do win because second place or third place is tantamount to last place (i.e., having to bear the switching cost of moving to the winning vendor in the market). This is a zero-sum game, where both vendors must proclaim themselves the ultimate winner, and the success of getting out the message is as important as the technical attributes of the product. 6.Evolution vs. Revolution: there are two paths for unseating an incumbent. One is evolution, which is akin to providing an adapter to a legacy technology. The other is revolution, which disregards legacy in favor of improved design (CDs as a replacement for records). Both paths have technical, creative, systemic, performance and legal considerations. 7.Openness vs. Control: This is a key tightrope in the age of open standards. The more open your solution, the lower the bar to positive feedback. With control comes a hedge against commoditization and low margin pricing. Four key vectors are represented: Controlled Migration (Windows 98), Performance Play (Iomega Zip), Open Migration (fax machines), Discontinuity (records to CDs). 8.How standards change the game: Expanded network effects, reduced uncertainty, reduced consumer lock-in, competition for the market vs. competition in the market, competition on price vs. features, competition to offer proprietary extensions, component vs. systems competition. 9.Tactics in formal standard setting: If you can follow a control strategy, you are better off organizing an alliance outside of the formal standards bodies. Search carefully for blocking patents of competitors in the standard definition. Consider building an installed base pre-emptively. 10.Waging a standards war -The key assets in such a battle are: 1. Control of an installed base, 2. Intellectual property rights, 3. Ability to innovate, 4. First mover advantages, 5. Manufacturing abilities, 6. Presence in complimentary products, and 7. Brand name and reputation. Example: Netscape vs. Explorer: Netscape had a huge first-mover advantage over Microsoft that Microsoft was able to neutralize by preempting new users through a number of strategies, including bundling on OS, signing deals with OEMs, bundling content with the browser and giving links to ISPs for making Explorer the preferred browser supported. Both vendors used penetration pricing to set a low bar to using their products. Both vendors also leveraged the expectations management and alliances trump cards to win their places in the market.
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Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy
Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy von Hal R. Varian (Gebundene Ausgabe - 1. Dezember 1998)
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