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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Educational and Motivational Material
Competing for the Future, by Gary Hamel and C. K. Prahalad focuses on new issues and techniques of strategic planning as discovered, articulated, and reported by the authors, both Professors of Business at the University of Michigan. The main message of the book reads as follows: in order for a company to be a success, the company must create its future instead of...
Veröffentlicht am 23. Januar 2000 von Irene Rozenberg

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2.0 von 5 Sternen Largely an academic waste of time
If your really want to understand how to compete for the future, read Crossing the Chasm, following by Inside the Tornado (Geoffrey Moore). Competing for the Future will largely waste your time. It is a 100 page book crammed into 300+ pages. The authors spend lots of time repeating fuzzy feel good ideas, and criticizing current managers, but say little that would...
Veröffentlicht am 31. Mai 1998 von Ray Salemi


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2.0 von 5 Sternen Largely an academic waste of time, 31. Mai 1998
Von 
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Competing for the Future (Taschenbuch)
If your really want to understand how to compete for the future, read Crossing the Chasm, following by Inside the Tornado (Geoffrey Moore). Competing for the Future will largely waste your time. It is a 100 page book crammed into 300+ pages. The authors spend lots of time repeating fuzzy feel good ideas, and criticizing current managers, but say little that would actually help you compete for the future. They continually cite Apple as the poster child for Competing for the Future (ignoring the fact that the Mac was created in a skunkworks -- a concept they poo-poo.) Yet you can see from Apple's plight today that Hamel and Prahalad have certainly not found the most important thing for long term success. Companies that spend too much time looking 20 years out will never see it, as Apple will not. The truth is that top management can certainly ask themselves "What will competition mean in 20 years?", but they will most certainly be wrong. We live in chaotic times, and the best companies know how to turn on a dime and exploit current emerging markets (Microsoft is great at this). Hamel and Prahalad's books is destined to sit on many shelves, looking very impressive but doing nothing for its readers.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Educational and Motivational Material, 23. Januar 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Competing for the Future (Taschenbuch)
Competing for the Future, by Gary Hamel and C. K. Prahalad focuses on new issues and techniques of strategic planning as discovered, articulated, and reported by the authors, both Professors of Business at the University of Michigan. The main message of the book reads as follows: in order for a company to be a success, the company must create its future instead of following other companies into the future.
By "creating the future" the authors understand defining and exploiting yet unknown future market opportunities. The opportunities do not have to be confined to the company's core competencies (although the book places significant emphasis on utilizing those). Instead, the company can choose to find alternate distribution channels, beneficial alliances, and other creative means of reinventing itself. The authors offer a wide array of management tools to successfully perform the corporate definition of future consumer needs.
The authors emphasize the corporate need for continuous innovation and reinvention. According to the book, many once-successful companies have failed because of their lack of regeneration and their erroneous belief in persistence of yesterday's business practices. Among the ways to successful corporate regeneration, the authors credit corporate diversity on the thinking level as successful means for breaking established corporate "myths" of the right way of doing business. The authors note that hiring personnel from outside industries can bring fresh and vital perspective on the present state of an enterprise.
In order to develop the future, a company must first define it. In defining the future today, Hamel and Prahalad suggest building "the best possible assumption base about the future." The "assumption base" is to indicate to management what changes in the company's products, competencies, and consumer interface are necessary in order to address future customer needs. The collective information about the changes of tomorrow comprises company's vision.
In order to create a successful vision of the future, a company needs dedicated senior management that "can escape the orthodoxies of the corporation's current 'concept of self'", and can enlarge the window of today's possibilities as projected into the future. The authors stress that a corporation should stretch the boundaries surrounding its competitive position of today in order to include tomorrow's competition and changes in customer needs. The book defines a successful corporate vision as the one that demands more of the corporation than the corporation is capable of providing today. Such a "stretch" between today's capacities and tomorrow's vision ensures that the company innovates in order to achieve the set goals, whereas "perfect fit [would guarantee corporate] atrophy and stagnation".
The book underscores the importance of basing tomorrow's market vision on core competencies of the corporation rather than on acquisition of other businesses or "grass roots 'intrapreneurship'". According to Hamel and Prahalad, core competencies represent "competitive strength" of an enterprise, defined and agreed upon by the company's general management. Building on the core competencies gives the company an immediate advantage over competition that needs to assemble similar competencies prior to entering the competitive race.
The authors note that corporate vision by itself "does not guarantee competitive success". In order for a company to be profitable, the company's foresight should be accompanied by a sufficient executional capacity. Executional capacity refers to continuous leverage of core competencies accompanied by healthy risk mitigation practices. The authors list several tools that can be used to leverage corporate core competencies in order to take hold of future market opportunities. One of the aforementioned tools is the process of aligning corporate operations based on core competencies rather than products and/or business functions. Operations focused on products and services fragment core competencies, and can subsequently truncate corporate opportunities for growth by disallowing deployment of core competencies when the need arises. Another crucial tool in successful execution of corporate vision is a regular review of core competencies together with competencies benchmarking against existing and potential competition in order to assure the company's market position.
In addition to the ideas cited in this paper, the authors describe myriad of ways to enhance tomorrow's competitiveness of an enterprise. Overall, the book is written in a motivational and comprehensive style. Peppered with real-life examples, the book offers thorough guidance to advance in the future marketplace.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Out of touch with reality, 9. Juni 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Competing for the Future (Taschenbuch)
My problem with this book is the same that I had with the authors' original "core competencies" article: they're perpetuating the view of the corporation as a little kingdom with its own political structure, slogans, foreign relations policy, and plans for future conquests. In fact, in today's business environment, corporations are losing their cohesiveness and their individuality. Furthermore, the authors seem to view "strategy" as something perpetuated by a corporation's strategists upon a vaguely defined "marketplace." What is missing from both concepts is PEOPLE: an organization's "core competency" may rest upon half a dozen key people who think of themselves as free lances and may go to work for the competition tomorrow if they get a better offer. Likewise, the marketplace is made up of individual customers, who have their own quirks and oddities and preferences, and failing to assess those is fatal. I don't deny that corporations have their own culture, or that synergies can emerge from the interaction of individuals within that culture. But what makes or breaks a corporation is its ability to attract and keep good PEOPLE, and all the authors' fuzzy theorizing seems to miss that point entirely.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Important reading for corporate strategic planners., 17. August 1999
Von 
Adam Lefton (Schaumburg, IL USA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Competing for the Future (Taschenbuch)
Although I'm no longer completely convinced that the "core competencies" approach is always the right approach to stategic planning, Hamel and Prahalad's work is important reading. Every organization should understand its core competencies and take them into account in their strategic planning process. Having said that, however, I personally prefer the "Key Strategic Driver" concept laid out by Mike Robert in his book "Strategy Pure and Simple". When working with my clients on strategic planning activities, we often discuss core competencies as a prelude to exploring the company's "driving force" or "strategic heartbeat". Adam Lefton
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen If you have the talent, here is the structure!, 22. Mai 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Competing for the Future (Taschenbuch)
This book is a classic ever since it went into its first print. Not only does it demonstrate the tremendous insight of the writers, it also provides a clear and structured way of putting all elements of the complex area of strategy together and focussing them on succes. If you are serious about the future and about spending some time on strategy just buy it and use it. It is a good roadmap. But remember: you have to cover the real territory.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Educational and Motivational Material, 23. Januar 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Competing for the Future (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Competing for the Future, by Gary Hamel and C. K. Prahalad focuses on new issues and techniques of strategic planning as discovered, articulated, and reported by the authors, both Professors of Business at the University of Michigan. The main message of the book reads as follows: in order for a company to be a success, the company must create its future instead of following other companies into the future.
By "creating the future" the authors understand defining and exploiting yet unknown future market opportunities. The opportunities do not have to be confined to the company's core competencies (although the book places significant emphasis on utilizing those). Instead, the company can choose to find alternate distribution channels, beneficial alliances, and other creative means of reinventing itself. The authors offer a wide array of management tools to successfully perform the corporate definition of future consumer needs.
The authors emphasize the corporate need for continuous innovation and reinvention. According to the book, many once-successful companies have failed because of their lack of regeneration and their erroneous belief in persistence of yesterday's business practices. Among the ways to successful corporate regeneration, the authors credit corporate diversity on the thinking level as successful means for breaking established corporate "myths" of the right way of doing business. The authors note that hiring personnel from outside industries can bring fresh and vital perspective on the present state of an enterprise.
In order to develop the future, a company must first define it. In defining the future today, Hamel and Prahalad suggest building "the best possible assumption base about the future." The "assumption base" is to indicate to management what changes in the company's products, competencies, and consumer interface are necessary in order to address future customer needs. The collective information about the changes of tomorrow comprises company's vision.
In order to create a successful vision of the future, a company needs dedicated senior management that "can escape the orthodoxies of the corporation's current 'concept of self'", and can enlarge the window of today's possibilities as projected into the future. The authors stress that a corporation should stretch the boundaries surrounding its competitive position of today in order to include tomorrow's competition and changes in customer needs. The book defines a successful corporate vision as the one that demands more of the corporation than the corporation is capable of providing today. Such a "stretch" between today's capacities and tomorrow's vision ensures that the company innovates in order to achieve the set goals, whereas "perfect fit [would guarantee corporate] atrophy and stagnation".
The book underscores the importance of basing tomorrow's market vision on core competencies of the corporation rather than on acquisition of other businesses or "grass roots 'intrapreneurship'". According to Hamel and Prahalad, core competencies represent "competitive strength" of an enterprise, defined and agreed upon by the company's general management. Building on the core competencies gives the company an immediate advantage over competition that needs to assemble similar competencies prior to entering the competitive race.
The authors note that corporate vision by itself "does not guarantee competitive success". In order for a company to be profitable, the company's foresight should be accompanied by a sufficient executional capacity. Executional capacity refers to continuous leverage of core competencies accompanied by healthy risk mitigation practices. The authors list several tools that can be used to leverage corporate core competencies in order to take hold of future market opportunities. One of the aforementioned tools is the process of aligning corporate operations based on core competencies rather than products and/or business functions. Operations focused on products and services fragment core competencies, and can subsequently truncate corporate opportunities for growth by disallowing deployment of core competencies when the need arises. Another crucial tool in successful execution of corporate vision is a regular review of core competencies together with competencies benchmarking against existing and potential competition in order to assure the company's market position.
In addition to the ideas cited in this paper, the authors describe myriad of ways to enhance tomorrow's competitiveness of an enterprise. Overall, the book is written in a motivational and comprehensive style. Peppered with real-life examples, the book offers thorough guidance to advance in the future marketplace.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Incredible insight into designing companies for success, 5. November 1998
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Competing for the Future (Gebundene Ausgabe)
The book is excellent!! I liked it so much that I summarized each chapter; the first summary was 25 pages long! The authors understand the very core of competition, and provide the reader with an understanding of how to build a great company. Chapter 1: Getting Off the Treadmill In addition to paying attention to their position in the current market, companies must focus more on creating the future of the industry and their stake in it. The primary challenge is to author industry transformation; organizational transformation is a secondary challenge. Revenue and net profit growth are essential, while cutting investments and headcount are only short-term winners. Chapter 2: How Competition for the Future is Different Competition for the future is competition to maximize the share of future opportunities a company could potentially access within a broad opportunity arena. The issue is how to attract and strengthen the skills that form the competencies that provide a gateway to future opportunities. In short, strategy is as much about competition for tomorrow's industry structure as it is about competing within today's industry structure. Chapter 3: Learning to Forget A company must take an honest look at itself and make sure it is basically well positioned to continue generating profit in a winning market. The best way to ensure that one is not at risk from more imaginative competitors is to be the first to get to the future, even when that future undermines past successes. This process often begins when employees are confronted with the potential disconnect between the success recipes of the past and competitive challenges of the future. Also, danger exists when all participants in an organization or an industry fundamentally think alike; organizations that challenge basic industry assumptions often emerge as industry leaders. Chapter 4: Competing for Industry Foresight (Imagining the Future) Industry foresight allows companies to envision ways of meeting unarticulated needs of current customers and needs of new customer groups as well. Foresight comes from wanting to make a difference in people's lives. A company that defines itself in terms of a set of end product-markets ties its fate to the fate of those markets; to successfully compete for the future, a company must be capable of enlarging its opportunity horizon. To build an assumption base about the future that is better-founded than its competitors, companies must engage in much internal dialogue. Chapter 5: Crafting Strategic Architecture (The Map to the Future) Companies should find and exploit natural competitive advantages. Just as there is a great risk in under specifying the future (being pre-empted by more clear-sighted competitors), so too is there a great risk in over specifying the future (racing off in the wrong direction). As additional insight into the best route to the opportunity is gained, investment commitments are escalated. Chapter 6: Strategy as Stretch The strategy process must be built upon a misfit between where the firm is and where it wants to be. Successful strategy focuses on making a difference in the lives of customers and insodoing inspires employees. Stretch (between resources and aspirations) and the creativity it engenders are the engine and fuel for corporate growth and vitality. Chapter 7: Strategy as Leverage The real issue for many struggling managers is not a lack of resources, but too many priorities, too little stretch, and too little creative thinking about how to leverage resources. It is stretch--the fact that ambition forever out paces resources--that fuels the engine of advantage creation. It is the ability to focus an entire organization's attention on key challenges that determines the rate at which the future is built. Resource leverage can be achieved in five fundamental ways: by more effectively concentrating resources on key strategic goals, by more efficiently accumulating resources, by complementing resources of one type with those of another, by conserving resources, and by rapidly recovering resources. It's not enough to get to the future first, one must also get there for less. Chapter 8: Competing to Shape the Future The three phases of competition are: to shape an alternate industry structure or develop a new opportunity area; to shape and shorten migration paths to this arena to your advantage; and for market power and position. The goal is to minimize both the time and investment required to turn foresight into genuine market opportunity. Getting to the future first may enable a company to establish the rules by which other companies will have to compete. A preference for following rests on an often erroneous premise that the follower has the skills necessary for a quick follow-up. Chapter 9: Building Gateways to the Future Every top management team is competing not only to protect the firm's position within existing markets, but to position the firm to succeed in new markets. To capture a disproportionate share of profits from tomorrow's markets, a company must build the competencies that will make a disproportionate contribution to future customer value. It is the desire to build world leadership in the provision of a key customer benefit, and the imagination to envision the many ways in which that benefit can be delivered to customers, that drives the competence-building process. Chapter 10: Embedding the Core Competence Perspective Most companies work hard to delineate precisely unit-by-unit ownership of existing competitive space, while often ignoring new competitive space. Also, too often an opportunity that falls between the cracks of existing market and departmental definitions, gets overlooked (i.e., why didn't CBS, which had skills in music and TV create MTV?). A focus on building and deploying core competencies will help alleviate these problems. Chapter 11: Securing the Future Every industry exists within a world market, and strategic decision making must incorporate this fact. When several companies are tracking the same broad opportunity area and striving to build roughly similar competencies, the issue is how to maximize one's share of worldwide revenues when the market finally takes off. What counts most is not hitting a bulls' eye the first time, but how quickly one can improve one's aim and get another arrow on the way to the target. True learning begins when a product or service--imperfect as it may be--is launched into the market. Chapter 12: Thinking Differently It is not enough to get smaller and better (through restructuring and reengineering); a company must also become different. Companies must think differently about competition (it often takes place outside the current market), strategy (by involving more people and focusing on the future), and organizations (by engendering commitment toward a particular point of view about the future).
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Competing for the Future, 3. Dezember 1999
Von 
Ronnie O'Dell (Los Angeles, California) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Competing for the Future (Taschenbuch)
The Business Strategy text written by Hamel and Prahalad delivers mind opening advice and insight that I consider to be helpful for all managers and professionals services consultants.
The text describes and recommends a shift in business strategy. More importantly, the negative impact of not shifting is illustrated by an abundant sample of real life situations (i.e. Xerox, General Motors).
In the past, and even still to this very day, senior managers in the U.S. are betting the ranch on reengineering and restructuring efforts as a means of staying competitive in the future.
Hamel and Prahald disagree with the continued touting of such efforts. While not completely against reengineering efforts, the duo write a convicing argument detailing that managers must shift from the old tools and invest more time and resources into innovation. The value of a company will not reside in how lean and efficient the operations are, it will reside in the company's capability and resources to create new businesses and get to the future first.
Resouces, capabilities, and processes under the new paradigm must and will operate in a state of constant change. Grasping on to the old business model will represent the company's death blow.
Companies under the new paradigm must develop an open environment by which the company can easily exploit new busineses quickly; hence, taking full advantage of the benefits of being first to market (dictating the market in contrast to following the market represents substantial profits).
Ronnie O'Dell
Division Marketing Executive Canon Astro Business Services, CANON USA Calabasas, CA
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Great Up-Date on the Peter Drucker Strategy Model, 27. Januar 1999
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Competing for the Future (Gebundene Ausgabe)
I am a corporate strategy consultant who works mostly with FORTUNE 200 companies, and I also write books and articles about strategy. Strategic thinking has gone in and out of fashion in such companies several times in the last 40 years. With this book, Hamel and Prahalad have raised the value of strategic thinking in the current context in an effective way. This book is clearly designed with the large company in mind, where the need to envision, communicate about, and organize for the future is most difficult. By breaking down strategic thinking into the elements described here, the authors make strategic thinking easier for those who have little experience. Interestingly enough, many companies have "banned" strategic thinking in favor of more tactically-oriented programs that produce near-term cost reductions. Our firm recently did a survey of the most successful CEOs, and they reported that they felt that better strategies had the most potential to most improve their companies. These same CEOs also reported that they understood little about how to create better strategies. In such companies, COMPETING FOR THE FUTURE can provide an excellent balance. A good book to read in conjunction with this one is Peter Drucker's, MANAGEMENT, which provides the intellectual heritage for many of these ideas. For people who need more detail than Drucker normally provides, COMPETING FOR THE FUTURE will be the more helpful book.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Burn all previous books on strategy?, 8. Februar 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Competing for the Future (Taschenbuch)
Read Hamel and Prahalad's act of faith that companies with a future will grow with strategic
architecture revolving round: core competences; banner brand reputations that all stakeholders can
relate to and trust; core products as pathways to innovation and new markets; business units which
see themselves as networking centres of excellence. And most old strategic tomes may seem to be
fiction, of a turgid kind to boot. For example, how many old strategists add cost (instead of value)
by obsessively spending their organisation's time and money on raising entry barriers? Does this
make sense in a post-industrial information era where no single organisation can serve customers
globally and locally, and where networks of partners will accelerate each other's unique learning
capabilities? Not that Gary Hamel feels that he has finished with Chartering the strategic revolution
that is needed if the value-adding passions for strategic change and creation are to be constantly
lived and learnt organisation-wide. (Revolutionary future updates should be sought direct from
Gary Hamel's web [...] ) Competing for the Future is a book which should
make newly curious students of all who read it. If you'd like to exchange new lessons which matter
most to you with other readers, why not join an interactive book club by contacting me now? .....
Chris Macrae, editor of Brand Chartering Handbook & MELNET [...]
E-mail me at wcbn007@easynet.co.uk
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Competing for the Future
Competing for the Future von Gary Hamel (Taschenbuch - 1. März 1996)
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