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20 von 23 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Sticking Point for Busting the Communications Stall
This is the best book about communications I've read since I discovered Stephen Denning's work on telling business stories. I highly recommend Made to Stick to all those who want to get their messages across in business more effectively.

Imagine if people remembered what you had to say and acted on it. Wouldn't that be great? What if people not only remembered...
Veröffentlicht am 22. Mai 2007 von Donald Mitchell

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18 von 20 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen You do not need this Book - but it works!
In their book Chip and Dan Heath explain why some ideas survive and others don't. In reality the book is not about ideas, but about their communication. Knowing that, you must compare their book to 'The Art of Woo' by Richard Shell and Mario Moussa.

Chip & Dan define 6 principles, which they found to be the Golden Rules for the successful communication of...
Veröffentlicht am 18. April 2009 von Ralf Schwartz


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2 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen The idea roars, the book bores., 4. Januar 2012
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die (Taschenbuch)
Basically, the idea that Chip and Dan Heath want to convey with their book ist good and feels right, but the way they present it is utterly flawed.

But first things first: As a writer myself, I am always looking for literature that helps me improve my writring, be it in the creation of a good story idea or in the final editing of the text. The concept that the authors present is a good one and I have already applied it for the writing of blurbs. However, I never actually read the whole book. After about 80 pages I started to feel bored since the authors did their best to avoid being "concrete". Every two or three pages the authors pose the question: "How do we accomplish that? How can we make our ideas simple/unexpected/concrete/credible/emotional/story-like?" But instead of answering the question they give you an example, followed by the words: "This was how someone else accomplished it. So how do WE accomplish that?" Followed by yet another example, and so on, ad infinitum, until you hit the end of the chapter.

So I decided to skip to the epilogue, hoping to find a precise summary to their concept there that moves away from the seemingly aimless babbling of the preceeding chapters. However, the first thing the authors presented me with in the epilogue was yet another example. So I closed the book.

Fortunately, the SUCCESs concept of the Heath brothers ist not too hard to grasp for someone with brains, so I did figure it out easily despite the authors every effort to bore me to death while reading the book. So the only thing I am willing to award some stars for is the idea concept presented in the book which is pretty good and useful.
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1 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen It is not enough to be convinced, you need to be convincing..., 9. Februar 2009
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...if you want to convince other people.

This is my personal summary of this brilliant book.

For me it is among the best books, if not the best, which I have been reading in the last years.

With many practical examples, Chip and Dan Heath explain how you can convince other people, or even fascinate them. Besides, the book contains many interesting hints for scientific research in this area.
If you have to deal with people, and you sometimes have to convince someone, even if it is only your boss about your next salary increase, this book is worth reading.
In the text, the book focuses on the word "idea". For me, the methods explained can also be used for new products, concepts, software and whatever needs to be explained so that others can understand and use it.
Chip and Dan Heath have developed the formula SUCCESS as shortcut to remember the content of their book. This also helps to follow the structure while reading the book.
I would like to close with my personal favorite passage:
Contrast the "maximize shareholder value idea" with John F. Kennedy's famous call to "put a man on the moon and return him safely by the end of the decade." ... Had John F. Kennedy been a CEO, he would have said: "Our mission is to become the international leader in the space industry through maximum team-centered innovation and strategically targeted aerospace initiatives."
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Die Heaths praktizieren was sie predigen : Und es funktioniert !, 19. September 2014
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die (Taschenbuch)
Ein Must Read für Lehrer, Pädagogen, Manager die Ideen und Konzepte vermitteln, Präsentatoren,...

Sehr faktenbasiert, kein Blabla und keine "Meinungen".
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting Read, 16. April 2009
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0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Sticking Point for Busting the Communications Stall, 2. März 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
This is the best book about communications I've read since I discovered Stephen Denning's work on telling business stories. I highly recommend Made to Stick to all those who want to get their messages across in business more effectively.

Imagine if people remembered what you had to say and acted on it. Wouldn't that be great? What if people not only remembered and acted, but told hundreds of others who also acted and told? Now you're really getting somewhere!

Brothers Chip (an educational consultant and publisher) and Dan (a professor of organizational behavior at Stanford Business School) Heath combine to develop Malcolm Gladwell's point about "stickiness" in The Tipping Point. To help you understand what they have in mind, the book opens with the hoary urban tale of the man who ends up in a bathtub packed with ice missing his kidney after accepting a drink from a beautiful woman. That story, while untrue, has virtually universal awareness. Many other untrue stories do, too, especially those about what someone found in a fast food meal.

The brothers Heath put memorable and quickly forgotten information side-by-side to make the case for six factors (in combination) making the difference between what's memorable and what isn't. The six factors are:

1. Simplicity (any idea over one is too many)

2. Unexpectedness (a surprise grabs our attention)

3. Concreteness (the more dimensions of details the more hooks our minds use to create a memory)

4. Credibility (even untrue stories don't stick unless there's a hint of truth, such as beware of what's too good to be true in the urban legend that opens the book)

5. Incite Emotions in Listeners (we remember emotional experiences much more than anything else; we care more about individuals than groups; and we care about things that reflect our identities)

6. Combine Messages in Stories (information is more memorable and meaningful in a story form . . . like the urban legend that opens the book)

Before commenting on the book further, I have a confession to make. This book has special meaning for me. I was one of the first people to employ and popularize the term "Maximize Shareholder Value" by making that the title of my consulting firm's annual report (Mitchell and Company) over 25 years ago when we began our practice in stock-price improvement. That term has become almost ubiquitous in CEO and CFO suites, but hasn't gone very far beyond the discussions of corporate leaders, investment bankers and institutional investors and analysts.

The authors use that term in the book as an example of a communication that hasn't stuck broadly. And they are right. Having watched that term over the years go into all kinds of unexpected places and be quoted by people who had no idea how to do it long ago convinced me of the wisdom of telling people what to do . . . not just what the objective is.

The authors make this point beautifully in citing Southwest Airline's goal of being "THE low-fare airline." If something conflicts with being a good low-fare airline at Southwest, it's obvious to everybody not to do it.

You'll probably find that some of the examples and lessons strike you right in the middle of the forehead, too. That's good. That's how we learn. I went back to a new manuscript I'm writing now and wrote a whole new beginning to better reflect the lessons in Made to Stick. I've also recommended the book already to about a dozen of my graduate business students. So clearly Made to Stick is sticking with me.

If you find yourself skipping rapidly through the book, be sure to slow down and pay attention on pages 247-249 where the authors take common communications problems and recommend what to do about them (such as how to get people to pay attention to your message). That's the most valuable part of the book. It integrates the individual points very effectively and succinctly.

I also liked the reference guide on pages 252-257 that outlines the book's contents. You won't need to take notes with this reference guide in place.

So why should you pay attention? The authors demonstrate with an exercise that people who know and use these principles are more successful in communicating through advertisements than those who are talented in making advertisements but don't know these principles. Without more such experiments, it's hard to know how broad the principle is . . . but I'm willing to assume that they have a point here.

No book is perfect: How could this one have been even better? Unlike Stephen Denning's wonderful books on storytelling, this book is more about the principles than how to apply the principles. I hope the authors will come back with many how-to books and workbooks.
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3 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Sticking Point for Busting the Communications Stall, 20. Februar 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
This is the best book about communications I've read since I discovered Stephen Denning's work on telling business stories. I highly recommend Made to Stick to all those who want to get their messages across in business more effectively.

Imagine if people remembered what you had to say and acted on it. Wouldn't that be great? What if people not only remembered and acted, but told hundreds of others who also acted and told? Now you're really getting somewhere!

Brothers Chip (an educational consultant and publisher) and Dan (a professor of organizational behavior at Stanford Business School) Heath combine to develop Malcolm Gladwell's point about "stickiness" in The Tipping Point. To help you understand what they have in mind, the book opens with the hoary urban tale of the man who ends up in a bathtub packed with ice missing his kidney after accepting a drink from a beautiful woman. That story, while untrue, has virtually universal awareness. Many other untrue stories do, too, especially those about what someone found in a fast food meal.

The brothers Heath put memorable and quickly forgotten information side-by-side to make the case for six factors (in combination) making the difference between what's memorable and what isn't. The six factors are:

1. Simplicity (any idea over one is too many)

2. Unexpectedness (a surprise grabs our attention)

3. Concreteness (the more dimensions of details the more hooks our minds use to create a memory)

4. Credibility (even untrue stories don't stick unless there's a hint of truth, such as beware of what's too good to be true in the urban legend that opens the book)

5. Incite Emotions in Listeners (we remember emotional experiences much more than anything else; we care more about individuals than groups; and we care about things that reflect our identities)

6. Combine Messages in Stories (information is more memorable and meaningful in a story form . . . like the urban legend that opens the book)

Before commenting on the book further, I have a confession to make. This book has special meaning for me. I was one of the first people to employ and popularize the term "Maximize Shareholder Value" by making that the title of my consulting firm's annual report (Mitchell and Company) over 25 years ago when we began our practice in stock-price improvement. That term has become almost ubiquitous in CEO and CFO suites, but hasn't gone very far beyond the discussions of corporate leaders, investment bankers and institutional investors and analysts.

The authors use that term in the book as an example of a communication that hasn't stuck broadly. And they are right. Having watched that term over the years go into all kinds of unexpected places and be quoted by people who had no idea how to do it long ago convinced me of the wisdom of telling people what to do . . . not just what the objective is.

The authors make this point beautifully in citing Southwest Airline's goal of being "THE low-fare airline." If something conflicts with being a good low-fare airline at Southwest, it's obvious to everybody not to do it.

You'll probably find that some of the examples and lessons strike you right in the middle of the forehead, too. That's good. That's how we learn. I went back to a new manuscript I'm writing now and wrote a whole new beginning to better reflect the lessons in Made to Stick. I've also recommended the book already to about a dozen of my graduate business students. So clearly Made to Stick is sticking with me.

If you find yourself skipping rapidly through the book, be sure to slow down and pay attention on pages 247-249 where the authors take common communications problems and recommend what to do about them (such as how to get people to pay attention to your message). That's the most valuable part of the book. It integrates the individual points very effectively and succinctly.

I also liked the reference guide on pages 252-257 that outlines the book's contents. You won't need to take notes with this reference guide in place.

So why should you pay attention? The authors demonstrate with an exercise that people who know and use these principles are more successful in communicating through advertisements than those who are talented in making advertisements but don't know these principles. Without more such experiments, it's hard to know how broad the principle is . . . but I'm willing to assume that they have a point here.

No book is perfect: How could this one have been even better? Unlike Stephen Denning's wonderful books on storytelling, this book is more about the principles than how to apply the principles. I hope the authors will come back with many how-to books and workbooks.

I would also like to commend the book's cover designer for doing such a good job of simulating a piece of duct tape on the dust jacket. That feature adds to the stickiness of this book.
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0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Sehr hilfreich..., 5. Juni 2013
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die (Taschenbuch)
Ein Buch voller Beispiele. Alles sehr gut nachvollziehbar und erinnerbar! Die Autoren beherzigen beim Schreiben das, was sie inhaltlich vermitteln wollen.
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0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Da bleibt was hängen, 2. April 2013
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Sehr empfehlenswerter Titel. Anhand von lebendigen Beispielen wird ein Einblick in Psychologie und Hirnforschung gegeben. Wie bleiben Ideen hängen und wie verbreiten sie sich, fast wie ein Virus, weiter? So spannend geschrieben, dass ich kürzlich meine Station verpasst habe.
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Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die
Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die von Dan Heath (Taschenbuch - 1. September 2010)
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