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Valley of the Dolls
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 17. April 2003
Fliegende Perücken bei Catfights unter Diven, zugedröhnte Hollywood-Schönheiten, VIPs in der Irrenanstalt - Nein, dabei handelt es sich nicht um die neueste Folge von "Sex And The City" oder "Der Denver-Clan", sondern um Jacqueline Susann's Mega-Bestseller "Valley of The Dolls". Da die deutsche Version stark gekürzt ist, empfehle ich die englische Ausgabe. "Valley" kann man nicht mehr aus der Hand legen, wenn man es erst einmal aufgeschlagen hat. Die perfekte Strandlektüre!
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 9. Juni 2000
If I tell you that this book changed my life, will you read it? You should. I first read Valley of the Dolls when I was a teenager, and it introduced me to the hypnotic pleasures of "junk fiction." I learned what it meant to read for pure, unadulterated pleasure, and what a thrill it was to read a book many times. Susann's depiction of three career women struggling to the top is a bicoastal orgy of pharmeceutical and artistic profligacy. Neely, Jennifer and Anne all succumb to the booze, dolls and hedonism of their showbiz lifestyles, and their spiralling declines are delicately laced in a book whose vulgarity belies Susann's rather superb craftmanship.
Susann's quirky bildungsroman borrows broadly from her own life, (documented in Seaman's wonderful biography, Isn't She Great), hints unsubtley at insider knowledge of celebrity hi-jinks of the postwar period, and circles around questions of morality with an exhilirating verve hardly visible now in the kind of bestsellers that emulate this classic. Its success on publication is legendary: Susann and her husband were shameless promoters of the book (it was sold in butchers' shops)and about as colorful as the fiction they were hawking. Truman Capote famously said of Susann that she looked like a truck driver in drag. His insult neatly captues the somewhat prosaic, yet always enjoyable prose of this novel as well as any reviewer could. For added pleasure, watch the movie. It's hard to see Neely O'Hara as anyone but Patty Duke after her extravagent performance in Mark Robson's quite faithful film translation, and Sharon Tate as the alluring Jennifer adds a poignant screen presence. But please, do not deny yourself the sublime camp pleasure of the novel.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 30. März 2000
When I first read Valley, I was a little surprised. Having seen the movie first, I expected the book to be the same. Boy was I in for a surprise! The movie didn't do it justice. This is the best book for anyone who ever wanted to see the edgier and raw side of love! Follow the adventures of Anne, Neely and Jennifer as the rise to fame and ultimately end up in the only place left to go: DOWN into the Valley of the Dolls! Anyone can be a star, but only for a short time. After the glitz wears off, you need an escape. The best escape comes in the form of a bullet-shaped pill. DOLL! Blessed DOLL! Try to be the same after you read the book. I know I wont ever be the same! Thanks to Jackie, I now understand the true meaning of self-sacrifice! What is a doll? The answer is up to you!
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am 14. Mai 2000
This book took me 2 days to read. I couldn't put it down. It taught me the reality of how many teens face problems such as drugs, and peer pressure. I have learned that money and fame isn't everything in the world. Life can be complicated. This book is about three friends which make mistakes througout their lives and end up paying the consequences. A great book in which will teach you and keep you entertained at the same time! Hope this helps.
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am 11. März 1999
Not a single boy in Anne Welles' New England home town is capable of thrilling her. Armed with both a small inheritance and a Radcliffe degree, Anne moves to New York in hot pursuit of excitement. Frigid New England, however, makes a frigid gal of poor Anne and the men of New York don't thrill her. Except for the caddish Lyon Burke. Lyon is no bargain, but Anne pursues him from the Postwar Forties to the Swinging Sixties, indefinitely delaying - or dooming - her own elusive happiness.
A comfortable living, first as a secretary, then as a cosmetics model, falls into Anne's lap. Her girlfriends, singer Neely O'Hara and actress Jennifer North, are equally successful, but, like Anne, are desperately unhappy. Valley of the Dolls tells of a woman's price for success in a man's world. Booze, pills, mental hospitals, weird health spas, suicide and cat-fights litter the way as the three girls harden their hearts on Madison Avenue, on Broadway and in Hollywood. Anne, Neely and Jennifer meet the hard-bitten Broadway war horse Helen Lawson, foreshadowing their fates.
Though the 1967 film version has its own merits (as one of the all-time great Bad Movies), fans owe it to themselves to experience the novel. The film tacks on a silly happy ending and shies away from the book's bittersweet tone and savage frankness.
Despite some awkward writing (such as Susann's over-use of the past perfect tense), VOTD is compulsively readable. An epic that spans twenty years and a dozen characters, VOTD makes millions feel blessed with by utterly ordinary lives free from the lurid thrills of beauty and success.
Susann's empathy for the characters, even the villainous and self-destructive, is probably the book's richest achievement. All the women, in pre-feminist times, are trapped by their sex. Anne, raised to eschew her happiness for the happiness of her man, fights against the limited choices offered to her. Neely pursues stardom and discovers that success is a weapon she can use against anyone. Her neediness, which she tries to control with Seconal, Demerol and speed, sends her on a long trip to hell. Jennifer, who wants a home and family, is forced into the limelight by her trashy family and endures years of humiliation. Even Helen Lawson, whom we meet only after she is well-weathered and cynical, elicits empathy as a woman who learns to live with the circumstances the younger girls are just beginning to face.
Before VOTD, Susann was known as an actress and as author of a novelty book about her poodle (Every Night, Josephine!). Publishers expected a sequal. Instead, they got a lurid potboiler openly discussing the taboo subjects of drug addiction, homosexuality, and even a hint of incest. (Incest became a more explicit theme in Susann's Once is Not Enough.) Though the book industry regarded the novel as pornography, Susann tirelessly promoted the book herself (with the help of her publicist husband) and broke records that stand today.
The publishing industry took quick notice; the agressively marketed, long-winded, lurid blockbuster "woman's novel" became a staple. The new edition, published by Grove Press (home of Henry Miller and William Burroughs), is out of the closet as a favorite of the new literary intelligencia. Dozens of today's edgiest writers learned about sex, drugs and harrowing storytelling (under the covers, with a flashlight) from VOTD.
Valley of the Dolls is a Sixties time capsule and a proto-feminist tome. Out of print for over 15 years, VOTD, rediscovered and taken seriously, takes its place as a pop culture classic.
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am 31. März 2000
I just finished reading the book again, and I found things that I had missed the first time around! Imagine! I never made the connection that these characters were based on people Jackie had known! I now can see why the novel was so controversial! Neely? Try Judy Garland! Helen? Try Ethel Merman! Jennifer? Try Marilyn Monroe! These had been just characters in her book until I read Lovley Me. I can now see where Helen was based on Ethel Merman. Although I must say, I was shocked to see where Neely was based on Judy Garland. But, in seeing this, I made the connection that although you think you know stars, for the first time, I see that even famous people have different sides that they show to others! I even learned some things about myself in reading this book! I see where I am like Neely in the way that I only take people for what they are and not what they want me to think they are. Having finished the book for the fifth time, I really relate to the childish way that Neely tries to manipulate the people in her life. The suicide attempt that happens after she is taken off of Let's Live Tonight almost matched the suicide attempt I had last summer when I couldn't stop drinking! I am forever in debt to Jacqueline Susann for showing me that fame isn't all it's cracked up to be! I have learned many valuable lessons in reading the book. Maybe I am not so bad off after all! Jennifer had a real talent for being honest and loving, but she never saw all that she could offer to someone. Never in my life would I have imagined that beauty could be a curse! An absolutely fabulous book about life and escapism! Once you read Valley, Mount Everest doesn't seem so beautiful after all!
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am 9. April 1999
It is said that reaching stardom is like climbing Mt. Everest. You climb and climb and when you finally get to the top, no one can touch you. But on the other side of the mountain, you look down and that's when you see the Valley of the Dolls. The fall from grace, the valley you reside in when you are no longer the star on top.
In Valley of the Dolls, Jacqueline Susann tells the story of three women though two decades. Anne is a girl from a small town who comes to New York looking for nothing more than an office job and someone to love. She finds herself almost married to all of New York's richest men, and eventually becomes a supermodel and television star. Her best friend, Neely becomes the Mariah Carrey of the 50's and becomes a star so big, she destroys herself, but not before destroying everything around her. Their other friend Jennifer is an actress who is considered one of the most beautiful women in the world. Her beauty brought her to the top, but the inevitable truth that it would someday fade brings her to her death.
I read this 440 page book in only 5 sittings. I just couldn't put it down. This book has everything: drugs, glamour, suspense, sex, deceit, and most of all excitement. There was never a boring paragraph. Valley of the Dolls gives a detailed look at how women in Hollywood were tormented and abused in order to attain the perfect image of a star. It also gave a good look at how women in the 40's, 50's and 60's were treated in general. It shows a lot hasn't changed. All in all, this book was a blast to read and I think any woman with the inclination that she wants to be famous should read it.
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am 17. April 1998
Valley of the Dolls by Jacqueline Susann was an amazing piece of entertainment. I would rate this book an 8 because of the fascinating story Susann tells of three extraordinary women and the choices they make throughout their lives. Valley of the Dolls takes the reader into a world of lights, cameras, and glamour at its peak; a place where the average person rarely gets to enter. Susann takes you behind the scenes of the music, Broadway, film, and television industries. The attractive and dazzling lifestyles of the famous are not always what they seem to the common observer. These women have the high-life status, but they go through the same trials and tribulations that all people do. There are cheating husbands, cheating wives, gold-diggers, sex, drugs, and alcohol. Everything that makes up a steamy and very interesting slice of fiction. Susann illustrates the ambition and drive needed to truly make it in the entertainment business, the power people acquire once they have grasped stardom, and the security love gives them above all things. Appearances are also of the upmost importance in the energetic novel. The lives of the characters are so unique and out of the ordinary, it is impossible to put the book down. The spicy romance and the tangled subplots are gripping the whole way through. Each of the characters has a totally different personality which makes it easy to love and hate certain characters. This sensational book of the faults, needs, and lack of self control people suffer from, is a book everyone should read in order to keep from falling into the "valley of the dolls."
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I work at a hotel as a bellperson so I have a lot of free time to read where there aren't any customers around. Yesterday was one of those days so I pulled out Valley of the Dolls, something I had checked out of the library the previous month. I didn't get through much at work but when I arrived home, I began reading. And reading. I didn't get to bed last night until 5 a.m. I woke up today promptly at noon and resumed where I had left off. I finished the book today at work at 10 p.m., devouring the novel at a rate of 50 pages an hour. True, any book one can read at that speed can probably not be classified as intellectually stimulating, however the novel more than makes up for it in emotional content. At one point, I was hitting the page, trying to warn a character not to submit, attempting to make her see matters more clearly. I suppose that is proof of how enveloped I was by this book. True, I don't consider myself smarter now, but I do see myself as wiser after reading the novel. It's a perfect example of how beauty, which is so exalted by our society, can be so detrimental. At the same time, it also showed me how unglamourous the world can be. I only come across this type of book about once every six months so now I'll have to go through another inevitable literary slump. Why did that book only have to be 442 pages? Oh well, I guess I'll never know.
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am 7. August 1998
On its initial release, Valley of the Dolls was roundly denigrated by literary critics as nothing but trash. They were and are right, but high art and the modernist novel have nothing to do with the daily lives and everyday obsessions of America's crude, vital pop culture. This book is practically a Bible of America's true interests - sex, celebrities, drugs, money, and a Puritan moralizing that makes every character suffer for their pleasure. In the thirty years which have elapsed since it was published, America has only become more obsessed with the phenomena and personality types chronicled by Susann. That said, "Valley" is also terrifically entertaining, often hilarious, and always over-the-top. Although virtually ignored by most reviewers, I think one of the book's key strengths is the power and rude vigor of its language - this is the way America really talks. Susann's characters speak a vernacular bursting with vitality and peppery slang. The ch! aracters themselves, despite their somewhat improbable names (although are they really more improbable than the names of people like "sylvester Stallone" or "Tori Spelling?") are treated with the utmost understanding and sympathy by Susann. I've read this book many times, and each time I enjoy it more.
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