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11 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen In Cold Type...
Truman Capote's 'In Cold Blood' is enjoying a resurgence of popularity thanks to the Oscar-winning film depicting the author's life and work during the writing of this phenomenal piece. At one point in the film, the character Capote makes the statement that when he thinks about how good this book will be, he can hardly breathe. Perhaps it is because it is part of our...
Veröffentlicht am 18. April 2006 von FrKurt Messick

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3.0 von 5 Sternen Could be better
While the point of view was interesting and different, i thought that the story was way too top-heavy. The endless flood of details at first added to the book, but eventually seemed to drag it down. The way he describes his characters, though is really well done, making us feel sorry for Perry and being able to understand him. But otherwise, it seemed to be a rather dry...
Am 19. Mai 1999 veröffentlicht


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11 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen In Cold Type..., 18. April 2006
Truman Capote's 'In Cold Blood' is enjoying a resurgence of popularity thanks to the Oscar-winning film depicting the author's life and work during the writing of this phenomenal piece. At one point in the film, the character Capote makes the statement that when he thinks about how good this book will be, he can hardly breathe. Perhaps it is because it is part of our history now, I don't consider the book to be that good, but it was a work fairly close to groundbreaking in its impact - it was a new genre, the narrative telling of a non-fiction event as if it were a fictional novel.

The narrative centres upon the murder of a Kansas family by two men, Perry Smith and Dick Hicock, who are in many ways far from typical killers, much less cold blooded killers. The family, the Clutters of Holcombe, Kansas, are far from typical victims, nor is this the kind of place such a murder would be expected. Capote does a remarkable job at an even-handed analysis and narrative treatment of all the characters, from the family itself to the townspeople and investigators, as well as the murderers themselves. Perhaps it is because he found an area of identification?

This is a psychological thriller of a sort - at least it would be, were it not a true life tale. Getting into the minds of the criminals and the investigators was no easy task for Capote, but what comes forth on the page is very crisp and insightful reporting, without the kinds of embellishments one might expect from a figure such as Capote when dealing with middle-America folk.

The question of why for the killing is still never fully resolved, despite Capote's attempt to set out all the story and psychological detail. Perhaps this is as strange as the interest Capote took in the subject in the first place, as well as the effect it had on him, and those around him, ultimately - while Capote himself never again finished a major project after this, that is also true of his assistant, Nell Harper Lee, whose book 'To Kill a Mockingbird' (done about the same time as 'In Cold Blood') was also her last major writing.

A worthwhile book in many ways.
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5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen In Cold Type..., 24. März 2006
Truman Capote's 'In Cold Blood' is enjoying a resurgence of popularity thanks to the Oscar-winning film depicting the author's life and work during the writing of this phenomenal piece. At one point in the film, the character Capote makes the statement that when he thinks about how good this book will be, he can hardly breathe. Perhaps it is because it is part of our history now, I don't consider the book to be that good, but it was a work fairly close to groundbreaking in its impact - it was a new genre, the narrative telling of a non-fiction event as if it were a fictional novel.
The narrative centres upon the murder of a Kansas family by two men, Perry Smith and Dick Hicock, who are in many ways far from typical killers, much less cold blooded killers. The family, the Clutters of Holcombe, Kansas, are far from typical victims, nor is this the kind of place such a murder would be expected. Capote does a remarkable job at an even-handed analysis and narrative treatment of all the characters, from the family itself to the townspeople and investigators, as well as the murderers themselves. Perhaps it is because he found an area of identification?
This is a psychological thriller of a sort - at least it would be, were it not a true life tale. Getting into the minds of the criminals and the investigators was no easy task for Capote, but what comes forth on the page is very crisp and insightful reporting, without the kinds of embellishments one might expect from a figure such as Capote when dealing with middle-America folk.
The question of why for the killing is still never fully resolved, despite Capote's attempt to set out all the story and psychological detail. Perhaps this is as strange as the interest Capote took in the subject in the first place, as well as the effect it had on him, and those around him, ultimately - while Capote himself never again finished a major project after this, that is also true of his assistant, Nell Harper Lee, whose book 'To Kill a Mockingbird' (done about the same time as 'In Cold Blood') was also her last major writing.
A worthwhile book in many ways.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen True Crime, 17. Juli 2000
Von 
Stacey M Jones (Conway, Ark.) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
The Clutters could be your friends, your family, your neighbors ... or you. A respected and loved Kansas farm family who built rich and promising lives for themselves, the Clutters' deaths came as a horrific shock to their friends, family and region. Capote writes about the depravity that ended their lives violently and horrifically in 1959 when two callous criminals targeted them based on a prison rumor that the family had a safe in which they kept a large amount of cash. But the murder wasn't just about robbing the family, as Capote recounts. These men brought their pasts and their malignant personalities with them, and when you read the account of that terrible night, you won't believe such horror could exist inside two "good old boys."
Capote sets up the novel expertly, building a suspense you might not think could exist. After all, we know they are murdered, it happens right away. Capote sets it up artfully by writing that it happened and then tracing the backgrounds and the paths of the killers up to the night of the murder itself, so that the details (yes, gory) of the multiple homicide are the climax of the book. Like a Shakespearean drama, there's a "fifth act" of some resolution regarding the fates of the killers and some of the Clutter family friends.
It reads like a novel and oh, how you wish it were only fiction. Reading this book will illustrate Capote's power as a writer and story teller. It really isn't to be missed.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Truth, fiction, or both?, 11. Juli 2000
"In Cold Blood" still produces a tremendous impact, despite the forty years that have passed since its first publication.
This account of a Kansas family's murder and the ensuing results commanded much attention when it was first published, attention that continues today. Capote's technique of interweaving facts with embellished details was innovative for its time. He fills in what he obviously can't know, such as the thoughts of the soon-to-be-murdered victims.
Since this book's publication, many imitations have followed, but "In Cold Blood" still stands out.
What Capote does best is the cultivate an interest in, and even sympathy for, all involved, not just the murdered Clutter family and their grieving friends, but also their two murderers, especially the sensitive soul, Perry Smith.
Capote is a master of his form. As any writer does, he manipulates the slippery truth, pinning down one version of reality that will remain in the minds of readers.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen An extraordinary achievement, 11. Juli 2000
Never has a book so completely enveloped an era, a culture and the effect of a horrific tragedy upon it.
Few people do not know about the murder, the conviction and the result. Some might know about the investigation, the names, or the places. However, these factual nuggets are but trivia now half a century later and do not begin to describe the depth and soul of Capote's account.
The murders would undoubtedly be horrific even today, although without the sharp sting of novelty they must have had then. However, while central to the story, are woven into the tapestry of the book with such subtlety, such remarkably constructed restraint and objectivity that the trap of sensationalizing the event is avoided. Yes, this is the story of four cold-blooded murders, but more than that, it is the depiction of an era, the reasoning behind what makes good men bad, the impact of tragedy upon normality and the deconstruction of black and white, or open and shut. It is a remarkable achievement that Capote manages to wrestle a measure of sympathy from his readers for all involved, from the Clutters, to Dewey and his men, and yes, even the killers.
Capote bled this book out of his system for five years and it was not without it's price. For his pains, he created one of the best books of the twentieth century.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Sehr lesenswert, aber keine leichte Kost, 17. November 2012
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: In Cold Blood (Taschenbuch)
Was mich an dem schon altbekannten Buch interessierte, war die Frage, wie die beiden Täter soweit kamen - tödlich für ihre zufälligen Opfer und sich selbst zu werden. Und natürlich war ich auch neugierig, was am Ruhm des Capote und seines (fast) einzigen Werkes dran ist.
Bekannt war mir die Story schon, mein Interesse wurde allerdings neu geweckt als ich "To kill a mockingbird" las (Wer die Nachtigall stört). Eine beeindruckende und vielleicht sogar zeitlos gültige Geschichte über unsere mörderischen Vorurteile. In der Geschichte kommt Truman Capote als Nachbarskind vor, und die Autorin Harper Lee hat ja dann auch Capote bei seinem Werk assistiert.
Das Buch jedenfalls ist absolut lesenswert - wenn man die Nerven dafür aufbringt. Die Morde sind nur als kleine Episode sehr dezent geschildert (ohne den bluttriefenden angebl. 'Realismus' wie heute üblich). Trotzdem schwer zu ertragen, wenn man sich nur halbwegs vergegenwärtigt, was das alles für die Beteiligten (inklusive Täter) bedeutet haben muss. Mehr als halbwegs geht ohnehin nicht ...
Ich find das Buch sehr empfehlenswert (auch englisch nicht zu schwer zu lesen für mässig sprachgebildete).
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The best ever, 23. Februar 2010
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: In Cold Blood (Rough Cut) (Gebundene Ausgabe)
There are many books about true crimes - but non of them had ever met the quality of "In Cold Blood" by Truman Copote.

The citizens of Holcomb, a small rural town in Kansas, are terryfied by a mass-murder: A rich and much respected farmer and his wife, their son (aged 12) and daugther (aged 17) had been shot dead without any motive recognizable. Nothing hat been stolen except a worthless radio and about 40$ cash, in fact the farmer was well known - and often teased - for his aversion against cash and the caprice to pay even small amounts with a cheque. So nobody from Holcomb could have had any hope to find much money inside the house - still there's evidence, that the murderer must have been familiar with the envoironment of the farm.
So the first suspect is the daughters boyfriend. But it soon turns out, that he has nothing to do with the crime.
Indeed, to the reader the murderers are already known: Perry Smith and Dick Hickock, just released from prison, were they'd temporarily shared a cell - and that they had choosen their victims deliberately, although there seems to be no link between this two wrecked guys and their victims.
With much sensitivity T. Capote describes the impact the crime has on the Citizens of Holcomb, in a town, where recently nobody bothered to lock the door, mistrust rises and roumor spreads.
Capote tells us also about the murderers characters and their former life. And he gives us an insight of sometimes dull and misleading police-work, that nevertheless eventually leads to the detention of Smith and Hickock.
But there are still questions not answered, about the violence and the entirely senselessness of the deed.
Just during the trial the complex relationship between the murderers unfolds, which actually had spurred some psychological chain-raction eventually leading to the crime.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen A "Nonfiction" Novel, 10. Mai 2000
Von Ein Kunde
In Holcomb, near the western border of Kansas, among wheat fields and desolate buildings, lays a small community of farmers and ranchers. On the morning of November 14, 1959, the Clutter's family of four were murdered by Perry and Dick. Although not the first writer to use actual events as a basis for a novel, Truman Capote narrates there actual events in a documentary style. The mystery of the novel is not who committed the murders, but to discover the identity and motive of the murderers. Capote gave the reader a view of the Clutters as people before they were killed, mot merely murder victims. He creates suspense by giving the description of the murders until Perry's confession and utilizes delays, such as the introduction of new characters, letters from the killer's family, and psychiatric records at the end of the book. One difficulty that a reader may experience could be the long-winded dialogues and letters from perry's family. sometimes the dialogues carry on for so long that it becomes laborious to keep track of what is going on or who's talking at what time. The plot however is not hard to understand or to follow. Characters in the novel are easy to get close to emotionally and mentally. Characterization is handled well by Capote to execute such knowledge of the Clutters and the killers. Capote gives his attention the the years of Perry's troubled childhood, youth, and adulthood including his difficulties with his father and the motorcycle accident that left him crippled. However, Dick's background and character are given inadequate attention, amounting to little more than his penchant for female children,and his conviction that he is a "normal." Capote makes us think how, such evil intrudes into the Clutter world, a world of self-discipline, religious faith, and dedication to hard work. The only order the murderers know is disorder.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen "Unforgettable in every way", 9. Mai 1998
Von Ein Kunde
I first encountered this book on an A-Level course at the age of 16 and have been hooked on reading Capote ever since. The wonderful juxtaposition of the Clutters, and Dick and Perry as they move towards the events that all told would kill six people (as we are told at the novel's opening), is truely wonderful.
A highly skilled writer Capote has an excellent eye for detail, and the memories of the Clutters, and reactions of the community created a sense of envolvment, empathy, horror and devastation, that I had never encountered before, nor I fear am ever likely to encounter again. For those who may likewise be interested in the author, I can whole-heartedly recommend the Gerald Clarke biography, and indeed a collection of Capote's work published by Penguin, "Capote: a reader". This item portrays the writers magnificient and diverse expertise, including travel logs, short stories and novellas. One in the latter category is "Breakfast at Tiffany's", a piece which is rarely commonly attributed to Capote, although known by a wide range of people - a great shame in my opinion.
"In Cold Blood" was highly controversal at the time, and still creates debates concerning the death penality, the McNaughty rules in the justice system, and among psychologists. A masterpiece that drew heavily upon Capote own's character, a great man who, along with his childhood friend Harper Lee ("To Kill a Mockingbird"), manages to retrive the thoughts and feelings of a deeply shocked Kansas community at an horrific time.
Although a book of faction, those areas of both fiction and fact are so cleverly interwoven, that although the final scene is obviously 'artistic license', there is no destraction from either the characters, events, or the reader's involvement. You may certainly never forget Perry's dangling legs in court, or Nancy's dress, or the auction.
A great read for all ages (from late teens onwards), all over the world, and an author that deserves to be bette! r known.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen In Cold Blood reveals the fallacy of small-town America, 21. April 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Through his descriptions of the people who live in Holcomb, Capote evoked the picture of a stereotypical 1950's middle-American town. The townsfolk were shown to be caring and neighborly, and the peaceful environment appeared so wholesome and pure. This picture of an ideal environment was best characterized by what we were shown to be an ideal family - the Clutters. However, in chronicling the mystery behind the four deaths, Capote revealed the fragility of Holcomb, its inhabitants, and the idea behind small-town 1950's America. The murders themselves, combined with the prolonged search for the killers, tore apart the seemingly strong fabric of the tightly-knit community and shook the very foundation of the small town. The sweet innocence of Holcomb was quickly and irreversibly corrupted by this first brush with crime, and was immediately replaced with an undercurrent of paranoia and fear in which even the most trusted of friends became wary of one another. In this sense, the deaths of the pure, wholesome, and innocent Clutter family was symbolic of the "death" of Holcomb's way of life which was to follow. Through the chronicle of Holcomb's change in collective attitude, we are at first quick to believe that their change in heart was due solely to the crime itself. However, by displaying the town's distrust even after the killers were captured, Capote reveals that these individuals were no different than anyone else living in any other town or city. The people we once saw to be entirely good-natured were shown to be as untrusting and contemptuous as anyone else might be. Capote shows us that the people of Garden City (or in any other 1950's small town) were of no better character than city dwellers, but because they did not have to face the trials and hardships that people in larger, more crime-ridden cities did, they could afford to be more trusting and neighborly towards one another. But after the murder of the Clutters - the first real crime in Holcomb in numerous years, their change of heart proved the fallacy of small-town America.
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