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5.0 von 5 Sternen a classic in the sci-fi genre (read and enjoy)
I read this book in class and I already had seen the film so my motivation to read was pretty low to begin with. But I quickly realized that knowing the film did not help much because the book is just much more complex than the film. Many themes are left out in the film that bring the book to a point where everything works together and is connected and related to each...
Am 1. Februar 2001 veröffentlicht

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3.0 von 5 Sternen A few words about this book
The science fiction book "Do androids dream of electric sheep?", written by Philip K. Dick, has not been without any reasons the inspiration for the cult-movie "Blade Runner", by Ridley Scott and starred by the actor Harrison Ford. It's a book about how life will be in future. When this book was first published in 1968 it caught all attentions:...
Am 17. Juni 1999 veröffentlicht


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5.0 von 5 Sternen a classic in the sci-fi genre (read and enjoy), 1. Februar 2001
Von Ein Kunde
I read this book in class and I already had seen the film so my motivation to read was pretty low to begin with. But I quickly realized that knowing the film did not help much because the book is just much more complex than the film. Many themes are left out in the film that bring the book to a point where everything works together and is connected and related to each other. When I actually started the reading I was fascinated and impressed by the way PKD is able to involve the reader into his ideas. I started to think about the philosophical questions that are discussed in DADOES and I think this philosophical aspect and the elaborate description of it is the main reason for the big crowd of fans that are discussing the problems that are brought up in the book even today. At the same time the book is still a sci-fi - novel which is easy to read. All in all I truly can recommend this book not only for all sci-fi-fans but also for everyone else who likes to think about philosophical questions or only wants to read a book to enjoy the reading...
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4.0 von 5 Sternen What makes human beings human?, 26. April 2003
Von Ein Kunde
Blade Runner is really a masterpiece in the category of dystopian sci-fi novels.
After a nuclear World War 3, planet earth's face has definitely changed to show a dreary, devastated view - for those who still live on the surface of it and have not migrated to an extraterrestrial colony.
In these new colonies, man holds so called "androids", a kind of a biological, genetically engineered and human-like robot, in order to colonize the vast, new landmasses. Gifted with intelligence of human beings some of them manage to escape the bad conditions of colonies' slavery and reach earth in a shuttle.
However, they are not allowed to do so and there are special forces called "Blade Runners" hunting their heads. This is called "retiring an andy".
Rick Deckard is a Blade Runner. Till today, everything has gone right but this time the Rosen Corporation, producer of the recently lanced "Nexus-6" series, has done a damn good job: Rick and his chief officer have their doubts whether they may be recognized from normal human beings by the standard Voigt-Kampff testing procedure. After having met the first exemplar of Nexus-6 types - a young female - Rick Deckard begins to realize that there are feelings of empathy towards it (or is it a her?) surfacing inside him.
Suddenly his persuasions start breaking into pieces...
One should not make the mistake to compare "Blade Runner" the movie and "Blade Runner - Do androids dream..." the book, for they clearly do not cover the same subjects, as neither they cover the same story. Both of them open many philosophic topics. But while the book concentrates on questioning our self-awareness of concepts of human qualities (what makes us different from perfectly functioning machines: intelligence, emotions, religion?), the film more focuses on the subject of mortality and desire for life, although of course there can't be a radical separation of the two.
However, both of them are absolutely worth being read or watched, respectively. "Was ist der Mensch?" Immanuel Kant's demand has not been resolved yet.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen (D)Evolving Mankind, 2. April 2001
Instead of repeating what has already been said about DADOES, (yes, I think it is a great novel, and the philosophic aspects such as Mercerism, the Mood Organ and the nature of humanity are really captivating...) I'd like to share an insight with you which I stumbled across while reading a short story written by E.A.Poe, "The Black Cat": The characters in DADOES use pets to prove to themselves that they are still human. Animals are nothing but a means of showing how much empathy and compassion there is in the depths of the owner's hearts. BUT the main character in Poe's "Black Cat" does exactly the same: He claims to be sensitive and human because he was fond of animals all along - only to evolve into a murderous, unfeeling monster that kills its own wife in the end. Rick Deckard acts along the same lines: He "cares" for his pets (or rather the status he gains by owning them), but is able to kill androits nevertheless. To be fond of animals isn't a good means of proving one's empathy, as it seems. The commander of the terrible KZ Auschwitz in WW2 wrote in his diary how he cried bitter tears when he was 8 years old because his cat died, trying to prove what a compassionate and sensitive person he was. Nevertheless he was able to kill millions of people (even children) without hesitation.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen One of Dick's four or five best, 25. April 2000
Von 
J. Kruppa "JKruppa" (New Orleans, LA United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
If you are coming to "Do Androids Dream..." by way of "Blade Runner", the film (loosely) based on the book, be warned: the two are similar only in their most basic plot outlines. As is typical of Dick in his prolific middle period (roughly 1962-1970), there is a lot going on in this novel. The main theme, dehumanization, is amplified by each character and situation, but Dick creates a rich environment that is equally compelling as the way that theme is explored.
In short, Rick Deckard's job is to kill renegade androids, a job he finds taking its toll on him. Sadly, he's not the only one who is feeling dehumanized: witness the existence of the Penfield Mood Organ (one of Dick's most touching inventions), through which one can alter one's state of consciousness by dialing the appropriate setting (such as "the desire to watch television, no matter what's on"); witness the cult around Wilbur Mercer, a vague messianic figure whose (literally) uphill struggle and persecution an individual can share by grasping the handles of a little black "empathy box"; witness Buster Friendly, a television personality bent on exposing Mercerism as a sham; and, lastly, witness the popularity of artificial animals (such as the electric sheep of the title) in a post-apocalyptic world where most real animals are either dead or sterile from radiation.
That Dick manages all of these sharply drawn ideas (and more, as well as a number of interesting characters) while still keeping the plot moving swiftly and ruminating on the nature of humanity is a tribute to his brilliance. "Do Androids Dream..." is not a perfect book -- there are a few loose ends at novel's close -- but it is a rich and rewarding one that retains its impact as the years pass. As a summation of several of Dick's ideas, it may also be the ideal introduction to this author's work.
Jason Kruppa
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5.0 von 5 Sternen It's life, Rick, but not as we know it..., 10. Dezember 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Sometimes one wonders why some people even bother to read. If you are a fan of the movie Blade Runner, and you are a little disapointed by this book, then shame on you. You shouldn't be reading books in the first place then! Rarely can movies capture all the themes and ideas of a book, and rarely can books capture the artistic cinematography of film. The two media are separate. Treat them as such.
What Blade Runner and Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? are about is the routine of police bounty hunter Rick Deckard. His job is to hunt down and "retire" fugitive androids. But what the movie only scratched the surface of is WHY those androids are fugitives. Fans of the character of Data from Star Trek, or of the computer Mike from Heinlein's The Moon is a Harsh Mistress will find the familiar theme of what it is that defines the difference between artificial intelligence and artificial life.
This is the realization that Deckard comes to and must deal with: these androids are not mere machines with off-switches, they are living creatures, aware of their own existence and their own mortality. In the post-nuclear holocaust world that Deckard exists in, humans define life by their ability to feel empathy. Empathy for the lives of each other, empathy for the lives of the remaining animal species of earth decimated by fallout, or empathy for artificial life. Eventually, Deckard questions his own ability to feel empathy, and therefore, his own humanity. For if being alive is about feeling empathy, then how can he truly be alive without feeling empathy for the living machines whose job it is for him to kill.
In the film version, Rutger Hauer's performance as one of the androids briefly captured the theme of the book, but it was never really explored and was instead sacrificed for artistic license. If you were intrigued by special effects, skip this book and rent Terminator 2. If you were intrigued by the question of artificial intelligence and artificial life, then you may want to ask if androids really DO dream of electric sheep.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Press a button to want to press a button., 1. August 2000
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep cannot be easily compared to the following movie, for they are both great in their own way. The book provides necessary explanations for the characters' actions, great plot, lots of cool sci-fi motifs. The movie (Director's cut, of course) lacks nothing - it is beautifully rendered by Ridley Scott with great imagery of a dystopian futuristic (according to the 80's) world.
My recommendation is that you read the novel and see the movie - it is the only way to fully enjoy the wonder of artificial intelligence embedded in an almost human body. A must for any sci-fi/fantasy/cyberpunk reader and anyone who even for a second experienced the fearful greatness of paranoia.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A breathtaking step into future, 1. Februar 2006
Philip K Dick's novel is so much more than the movie "Bladerunner". Although the most important features of the book can be found in the movie, too, it is like with most of the books that became a movie. The book adds to the world shown in the movie so much more, for example some breathtaking aspects to the story, an explanation to some important circumstances, and a religious aspect. Which reminded me in some way to SciFi-highlights like "1984" by George Orwell or "Fahrenheit 451" by Ray Bradbury. An artificial belief is set out to the ordinary people, which is also adopted by some of the higher ones.
But bounty hunter Rick Deckard does not believe in this Mercerism. Most of the time it seems like he does not have any belief at all, except a belief in his gun and the apparatus he works for, including the aim that it wants to achieve. To me this aim seemed quite familiar: to protect the ordinary people and the special ones that still remain on earth after a nuclear war, that made a wasteland of most of the earth's surface. To prevent them from gathering information, that would produce incomfort - that androids of the most sophisticated type sometimes make it from Mars (where now most of the people live, together with the androids as their servants and slaves) down to earth. That those androids can look and behave like normal people. Except for empathy. But concerning the behaviour of our protagonist, one might ask if HE is able to feel empathy - especially after a quite delicate scene with such a Nexus-6 android. But Deckard does not only dream of electric sheep as some of the androids do. So he might finally be able to feel empathy - at least towards real, living animals.
It was so much thrill reading this book, and even as a non-native speaker I was astounded how easy Dick's sophisticated hand of writing could be understood. I will definitely read this book more than once again!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Blade Runner is a joke compared to this., 8. Juni 1998
I could never understand why Ridley Scott thought if he removed the theological aspects, the other main character (Isadore), the concept of empathy and the artificial animals and replaced them with shallower characters, long boring pans of a crowded (huh?) world, slow-motion violence and a cheese-ball narration (ei. "my name is Rick Deckard, I'm a killer" and that's it) he could improve upon the story. The movie took some of the plot and none of the theme. The only question it left me asking is "why the hell did they give this guy such a big budget to make this snorefest?" Dick was rightfully purturbed when he read the first draft of the script and said it was a load of "crap". Scott might as well have changed the names and simply said "inspired by the works of Phillip K. Dick" or some such thing. If you haven't guessed yet, I don't like the movie. Having read the book first, and still leaving a lot of room for changes, I was still disappointed at every turn. The book, in typical PKD style forces us to question our fragile reality. Can we draw lines on where life starts. Being nothing but a mass of super encoded information ourselves what stops a computer that can hold just as much info from being alive and does religion spring from the well of life or is it a side effect of it? If our existance is tattered and dismal enough can we not chug on without empathy for our fellow man, do we need an instrument that can give it to us or else fall into oblivion? And if this is the case and we kill what we perceive as inhuman yet we define humanity as empathy than should we not erase our selves? Or are we doing so as we speak? The questions can go on and on. The book (as all later PKD works) will change your precepts if your not to brainwashed or shallow to let it. If you think the book needed more action then stick with Arnie movies. (Speaking of which, Arnold was in an even more failed attempt to bring PKD to the big screen in Total Recall, a stupid, n! eedlessly violent action flick that was based on a short story. It took a long time for American action-movies to take the cue from John Woo and his contemperaries who proved cinematic violence holds a strange and twisted beauty, too late I guess for Ridley Scott)
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4.0 von 5 Sternen "Androids" Are a Dream of Their Own, 15. August 1997
Von Ein Kunde
In Philip K. Dicks novel "Do Androids Dream of
Electric Sheep", Dick explores humanity not only in the near future, but also in the present. Although written in the sixties, Dick had a keen eye on what makes humans tick, emotionally as well as intellectally as he explored the life of Rick Deckard in the year of 2021. The cult classic hit movie BLADE RUNNER was loosely based upon this novel, however fans new to the book should be warned: the book is superior and vastley different from the movie.
In the year 2021 Earth is slowly recovering from a world war that has destroyed most of the animal population and drives the healthy humans onto other outworld planets, namely Mars. Existing animals are taken care of by the humans unable or unwilling to leave Earth,and according to society, it is a sign of prestige and honor to take care of these animals. Humans have developed not only androids to assist colonists on other planets, but also electronic animals so humans unable to afford expensive live animals are able to keep their dignety with fake animals that look almost real.
Already in the begining of the book, Dick has established a world that fits his unique style. Quetioning what is reality, identity, and consiousness is Dick's specialty. And nowhere else can you find that more prevulant in his protaganist Rick Deckard's conflict with himself as he pursues 6 renegade androids\replicants from the off worlds. During his pursuit, Rick encounters not only the replicants but also other characters that further Rick's journey into what seems is self-discovery.
Dick has not only established himself in the genre of scince fiction with his work, but has also showed what a true writer is. His ability to explore the characters lives in this particular story and expanding the readers awareness is a sign of pure genius. "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep" has this written between its pages.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Lessons from the fall of man that never happened.. yet, 10. Juni 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Having read this book for the the third time I am only just now grasping the delicate message that Phillip K Dick so carefully wove into this novel. Despite the sucess of "Bladerunner", a movie that only slightly borrows from the book, and I think this is to the better.
Centered around a gravely wounded earth, that may or may not be dying, "Do Androids..." is a story about one man amoung the multitudes of humanity comming to the realization that he "feels" for the androids that he is employed to track and kill. The vehicle for his conversions is the bleakness that he feels within his own soul... I feel that he struggles with this inner sorrow right to the end of the book, with his discovery at the end being a glimmer of salvation, until his wife shuts it out...with the line "...its electric you know...", and you realize the signifigance of his struggle... his search for meaning, for reason to be, and a reason that the "andys" are not allowed to be. In his job, killing rogue androids, he gives a test, and empathy test, to determine the response... different for humans and androids, it is through this test that I feel he comes to pity that which he is forced to destroy. In the bleakness of the environment and that of his own soul, you can sense the struggle to continue, to go on living a human life. This is why I feel the title sums up Deckard's inner question... "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep." Do they feel as he does, only in a machine-like, autonomous manner, is his bleakness mirrored in the bleakness felt by Pris in her sorrows at the deaths of her friends... is this not a form of empathy. Does this not defy his reasons for judging them. I feel the lesson from this book is one of Mankind keeping a closer, more compasionate view of the thinks we alter and create. For us to realize that feeling is an unmeasurable quality... a thing beyond programming, or construction. It is a thing discovered. And I think Phillip K Dick answers this well.. by giving us no answer at all
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Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (Gollancz)
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (Gollancz) von Philip K. Dick (Taschenbuch - 8. März 2007)
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