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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen They called Moreau their God
Until I read this book, I didn't know that a serious novel about human like animals existed. Certainly H.G. Wells is not most well known as one of the fathers of sci-fi for this novel. It was one of his first, published in 1896, and the book lovers of the time must have really found this work disturbing and shocking. Maybe that's why The Island of Dr. Moreau has been...
Veröffentlicht am 5. Februar 2000 von Javier Pleitez

versus
3.0 von 5 Sternen Well's classic tale reread.
Reading "The Island of Doctor Moreau again as an adult, I was struck by an abundance of Biblical allusions I missed when reading it as a child. Then, the monsters and gore kept me up nights staring at my closet door. Now I realize how, like Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein", the novel probes man's almost instinctual urge to attain godhood. However, Well's...
Am 29. Dezember 1998 veröffentlicht


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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen They called Moreau their God, 5. Februar 2000
Until I read this book, I didn't know that a serious novel about human like animals existed. Certainly H.G. Wells is not most well known as one of the fathers of sci-fi for this novel. It was one of his first, published in 1896, and the book lovers of the time must have really found this work disturbing and shocking. Maybe that's why The Island of Dr. Moreau has been playing catch up to The Time Machine and War of the Worlds ever since. I admit that I myself found the basic idea in this book very cruel, but I realized that the book covered other issues as well. Besides being the novel about an insane scientist who tries the hand at playing God, this book evokes thoughts of social responsibilty and freedom of all living things. Also, it shows that sometimes who we think of as being authority really have no right to be, and deals with anarchy and revolution. But it is the basic plot that has the most effect. Why does Moreau torture animals so that can make them in the image of man? Dr. Moreau beats Victor Frankenstein on who is a more of a nutcase. Frankenstein intended for something good to come out of his work. Moreau did his experiments just for curiosity. He didn't expect for his creations to have any real purpose. He didn't care for them. And yet he brainwashes his creations to fear and respect him, to treat him like a god, and follow his laws. And another thought occurs. What really seperates man from beast? What causes humans to sometime commit violent and brutal acts? What does that account for? When I read this novel, the reality of what genetic cloning may become years from now passed through my mind. If genetics had been an established science in the 1890's, Wells could of utilized it in this book, but he would probably have created a controversy beyond any proportion. But certainly the ignorance of genes back then was not his fault, and he came up with probably the best substition: vivisection. Being the substitute of what was unknown and likely more plausible, vivisection was more than enough to shock Well's audience of reading about the blasphemous idea of creating "Beast-People". I am certain that people in 1896 weren't ready for it. Neither are we. That's what I think is the main reason that The Island of Dr. Moreau isn't as popular as H.G. Wells other novels. I found, however, that this was a worthwhile read because its suspense and creepiness intrigued me, and it made me think of some social issues. If you're a person who can bear reading a grotesque story of cruelty and suffering, I highly recommend this book.
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5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Von der Degenerationsangst am Fin de Siècle, 15. September 2006
Von 
A. Wolf (Wiesbaden) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Herbert George Wells' "The Island of Dr. Moreau" ist ein echter Genreklassiker im Bereich der Spannungsliteratur. Das soll jedoch nicht bedeuten, dass sich "Moreau" auf bloße Spannungseffekte und Elemente des Morbiden reduzieren lässt - gleichwohl dies Ende 1897 durchaus der Fall war.

Doch "Moreau" erfüllt höchste literarische Ansprüche, denn neben der fesselnden Erzählweise ist die Geschichte vor allem ein wahres intertextuelles Sammelsurium, von Shakespeares "Sturm" über Kiplings Dschungelbuch bis hin zu Defoes "Robin Crusoe".

Edward Prendicks Schiffbruch führt ihn auf eine Insel voller schrecklicher Kreaturen, auf der Dr. Moreau - einst umstrittener Tierforscher in England - sein Unwesen treibt. Sein stets allen Fragen ausweichender Gehilfe Montgomery und das merkwürdige Wesen M'ling komplettieren die unheimliche Troika. Prendick wird es noch mit der nackten Angst zu tun kriegen, als Experimente auf verhängnisvolle Weise scheitern.

Neben dieser spannungsgeladenen Handlung lässt der Text noch tiefer blicken, sehr tief, denn er offenbart ein relativ pessimistisches Menschenbild, indem die Degeneration - also die umgekehrte Evolution - per se in jedem Menschen vonstatten gehen kann. Jeder Mensch kann zu jeder Zeit seine Kultur niederreißen und zur wilden Bestie werden.

Wells' Text entstammt dem Fin de Siècle, einer Zeit gróßer kultureller Ängste, die einerseits wilden Degenerationsphantasien Vorschub leistete, aber auch Texte beisteuerte, die starke moralische Kritik am Zeitgeist aufkommen ließen. Das Menschenbild von Wells ist durchaus ethisch geprägt, ist sehr bescheiden und auf seine Moralvorstellungen reduziert, welche ihn alleinig vom Tierischen unterscheiden. Der Lauf der Weltgeschichte gibt Wells Recht. Ein wahrer Klassiker. Absolut lesenswert.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen -, 4. Mai 2000
Von 
100-150 years ago, there were two visionary authors who became the pioneers of the science fiction genre. The first, who predicted the coming of space travel, sea travel, and modern geology, among other things, was Jules Verne. The second, who developed the idea of an Invisible Man, Martian Invaders, Time Machines, Atomic Energy, and Genetic Engineering, was H.G. Wells. The greatest works of Verne came true and yet men still strive to accomplish the ideas developed by Wells. Which one was the true visionary?
However, two famous works of Wells HAVE come true. The first is his beliefs for the use of Atomic Energy in 'The World Set Free,' the other is man's perfection of nature in 'The Island of Dr. Moreau.' The main difference is that his modern day's 'viviseciton' has been replaced by OUR modern day's genetic engineering.
Here is classic Wells; man's struggle with concepts of nature which he cannot comprehend, his inevitable downfall, and salvation and forgiving through nature. Yet in 'The Island of Dr. Moreau,' Wells's belief that humans are basically evil is never more easy to see.
It also flows at a much smoother pace than some of his other novels, however certain parts can be hard to understand (I still don't understand exactly HOW the animals can talk and why they revert back to animals after 10 months WITHOUT Moreau as opposed to being half-humans for years WITH Moreau). And the end feels rushed as well.
Overall, I would recommend it to anyone who appreciates science, literature, and the strange feeling that comes with the realization that a book that seems so modern was written so long ago.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Island of Dr Moreau is a masterpiece., 6. Juni 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Written more than a century ago The Island of Dr Moreau is still read by many people to this day. An Englishman is shipwrecked and lands on the island where Dr Moreau portrays god and struggles to create the perfect race. Messages on evolution and the misuse of intelligence is found throughout the book. Issues on the role of God and his relationship with mankind are also discussed. Everyone can relate to The Island of Dr Moreau through the the beast people. We are the beast people surpressed by God, or Dr Moreau. We bury our intincts and our desires, and try to follow what society believes is right. Once in a while those emotions can no longer be hidden and they burst through our molded personalities. It is probable that this is what HG Wells was trying to express in his work since it was written in 1896, around the same time when Charles Darwin anounced the idea of evolution. There are passages in the book that make reference to the old testament. I enjoy this controversial aguement in The Island of Dr Moreau. This might well be the mystery that unkowingly intrigues poeple to read this book. Anyone will enjoy this classic science fiction thriller.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Island of Dr Moreau is a masterpiece., 6. Juni 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Written more than a century ago The Island of Dr Moreau is still read by many people to this day. An Englishman is shipwrecked and lands on the island where Dr Moreau portrays god and struggles to create the perfect race. Messages on evolution and the misuse of intelligence is found throughout the book. Issues on the role of God and his relationship with mankind are also discussed. Everyone can relate to The Island of Dr Moreau through the the beast people. We are the beast people surpressed by God, or Dr Moreau. We bury our intincts and our desires, and try to follow what society believes is right. Once in a while those emotions can no longer be hidden and they burst through our molded personalities. It is probable that this is what HG Wells was trying to express in his work since it was written in 1896, around the same time when Charles Darwin anounced the idea of evolution. There are passages in the book that make reference to the old testament. I enjoy this controversial aguement in The Island of Dr Moreau. This might well be the mystery that unkowingly intrigues poeple to read this book. Anyone will enjoy this classic science fiction thriller.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen "and i go in fear", 13. Mai 1998
Von Ein Kunde
And it is with these words that the main character in Hg wells masterpiece, "the island of Dr moreau",expresses the feeling of being back in civilization. This is not a book just about being trapped on an island with a madman, but is a book about finding ourselves here in this existence and confronting and doing battle with the dual nature of animal and human in each of us. It is the struggle between social responsibilty and personal freedom, between the primal, organic impulses and the spiritual and intellectual. The conflict is eternal and inherent in what it is to be human. To negate and deny the other aspect is to live a life lacking of the full breadth of what it is to be human and to be at conflict with oneself. To live with both aspects is to live, paradoxically, with the same struggle. So here is man, as he is, doing what he can in this chaotic, crazy world,as the main character does,looking to the stars for "hope".
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4.0 von 5 Sternen The need for an ethics in any inquiry or research., 4. Juni 1999
In this allegorical novel, a shipwrecked biologist named Edward Prendick finds himself on a remote island where a physiologist named Moreau is conducting bizarre experiments in the vivisection of animals to generate new species (for no other purpose than just to do it). The way I view this novel, Moreau is doing this work simply for his own intellectual enjoyment. He sees a problem or a concept and is attempting to answer or address it. I don't think he even cares about publishing what findings he may have so that others might possibly use his results to improve the state of man. He simply doesn't care. Morality and ethics do not form a foundation for his "scientific" enquiries. And, that is the "evil" in his work.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Memorable, 30. März 2000
I would have given it five stars if it wern't so short.The Island of Dr. Moreau is about a man named Prendick who , after his ship was distroyed, ended up one way or other on a small island. On this island is an exiled scientist from London, who does strange and cruel experements on animals. The strange animals here live in a peaceful civilization. In this civilization there are laws, and if these laws are ever broken 'none escape' the 'Master'(Dr. Moreau) and are sent to the 'house of pain'. One of the laws is not to eat flesh or fish, and when this law is broken by one of the Beast-Folk all hell brakes loose and Dr. Moreau's world, and Prendick's, falls crashing all around them.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen The law, 18. Juli 2000
Von 
Brian Almquist "-baa-" (Iowa City, IA USA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
There is one scene: Prendrick has fled the compound and has entered the village of the beast people. He sits in on a bizarre ceremony where a leader recites the laws of the beast people. The reader, with a heavy ominous sense, can feel that these laws are ultimately meant to be broken . . .
Though the story is crowded at the beginning with the plot logistics of stranding the narrator on the island with Moreau and his creations, and the ending is sort of rushed, Wells has created a horror novel of startling implications and fantastic imagination. You'll never look at your genetically engineered tomatoes the same way again.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Well's classic tale reread., 29. Dezember 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Reading "The Island of Doctor Moreau again as an adult, I was struck by an abundance of Biblical allusions I missed when reading it as a child. Then, the monsters and gore kept me up nights staring at my closet door. Now I realize how, like Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein", the novel probes man's almost instinctual urge to attain godhood. However, Well's skill as a writer is sadly unequal to his ability as a storyteller. How many times can a person use the words "singular" (meaning peculiar) and "darkling" in a hundred page novel without a washing-out of their initial effect? Not many.
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The Island of Dr. Moreau (Bantam Classics)
The Island of Dr. Moreau (Bantam Classics) von H.G. Wells (Taschenbuch - 1. Mai 1994)
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