Kundenrezensionen


93 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (55)
4 Sterne:
 (22)
3 Sterne:
 (11)
2 Sterne:
 (1)
1 Sterne:
 (4)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


17 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Truly a Classic!
OK, we've all seen at least one of the movie versions of H.G. Well's The Time Machine, but none of them truly compare with the oringinal Sci-Fi classic. The book tells the story of the Time Traveler's journey nearly a million years into the future and the very unexpected and disturbing society he finds there. The Time Traveler formulates various theories based on...
Am 21. Oktober 1998 veröffentlicht

versus
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Time Machine
It was a great book, but the plot and the setting was a little bit hard to understand. I would recommend this book to young adults only due to shortness of it. The vocabulary was a bit complicated but overall it was a pretty good book. When the Time traveler stepped out of his time machine for the first time, he found himself in the year 802,700 and everything has...
Veröffentlicht am 24. März 2000 von Ron L


‹ Zurück | 1 210 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

17 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Truly a Classic!, 21. Oktober 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Time Machine (Bantam Classics) (Taschenbuch)
OK, we've all seen at least one of the movie versions of H.G. Well's The Time Machine, but none of them truly compare with the oringinal Sci-Fi classic. The book tells the story of the Time Traveler's journey nearly a million years into the future and the very unexpected and disturbing society he finds there. The Time Traveler formulates various theories based on what he observes of the society, which each, in turn, prove to be oh, so wrong! [Warning: mild spoiler] In the end, his realization of the future is especially terrifying considering it is the result of our current social structure (or H.G. Well's, anyway).
I especially recommend this book for those of us with short attention spans - it's only 140 pages (and that's the large print version). But don't get the wrong idea, this book still has more depth and creativity than most 500 page books i've read and is a great read, even compared with today's science fiction standards.
This book has to be considered a classic considering it spawned a whole genre of time traveling books, movies, and tv shows whcih imitated it. Get a hold of a copy and read it today!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Future Shock, 15. Dezember 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Time Machine (Tor Classics) (Taschenbuch)
This was the first book I read by HG Wells, at the age of 12. (I saw the film first.) After taking a trip into the future, a Time Traveller returns to the 19th century and tells his colleagues what he saw.
In the distant future there is nothing, not a trace, of our world left. The Time Travller discovers a new society and finds that we have evolved into a puny, ineffectual race called Eloi. At night he discovers the other half of the society, the hideous, carniverous Morlocks. The Eloi live simple lives and play in the sun. They are food for the Morlocks, who live underground, operating machinery. The Time Traveller goes even further into the future, to a depressing world where the sun is dying and monstrous creatures roam the surface.
Getting away from the point for a moment, there was once a "Doctor Who" story called "Timelash". In that story the Doctor travels back in time and meets a young writer called Herbert, who accompanies the Doctor on a journey to the future on another planet. There are monsters called Morlox. At the end of the story the young writer gives the Doctor one of his cards, which has the name HG Wells. The story implied that HG Wells' novel was inspired by the Doctor! But in reality "The Time Machine" paved the way for "Doctor Who", one of my favourite childhood shows. So we owe a lot to Wells.
Time travel looks like a fun thing to do but sometimes it's best if the future is left unknown. Would you want to know your own future and find it's not what you hoped for?
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


13 von 14 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Ein Klassiker von Weltrang, 3. Mai 2004
Von 
Dr. Roland Seim (Münster) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Wells' Zeitmaschine thematisiert einen der größten Menschheitsträume - den Wunsch, sich nicht nur durch den Raum, sondern auch durch die Zeit bewegen zu können.
Zwar birgt diese Thematik aus heutiger Sicht mehr Möglichkeiten als der Autor zu seiner Zeit hineinpacken konnte. Dennoch ist dieses Buch ein ebenso spannender wie interessanter Meilenstein des Science-Fiction-Genres.
Wenn die Schulkinder dabei nicht "mündlich" mitmachen, dann mag das vielleicht eher an der pädagogischen Vermittlung denn am Stoff liegen. Nicht zuletzt gibt es zwei Verfilmungen (wobei nur die ältere zu empfehlen ist), mit der man den Schulkindern diese Thematik näher bringen könnte.
Und ob sich die Menschheit nicht tatsächlich in (mindestens) zwei unterschiedliche "Klassen" aufspalten könnte, sollte zumindest diskutiert werden, ohne diesen Ansatz gleich als "sozialdarwinistisch" zu verwerfen. Die Zeit wird zeigen, wie sich die Sache entwickelt. Wells war ja kein Prophet, sondern Schriftsteller.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Time Machine, 24. März 2000
Von 
Ron L (Williamsville , N.Y.) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Time Machine (Tor Classics) (Taschenbuch)
It was a great book, but the plot and the setting was a little bit hard to understand. I would recommend this book to young adults only due to shortness of it. The vocabulary was a bit complicated but overall it was a pretty good book. When the Time traveler stepped out of his time machine for the first time, he found himself in the year 802,700 and everything has changed, as he knows it. In another more different age, creatures seemed to come together in perfect harmony. The Time traveler thought he could study these marvelous people find out the secret of the future and then return to his own time, until he discovered that his invention, his only way to escape, had been stolen. So the Time traveler has to recapture his time machine in order to return to his own time, but it is not an easy task because he soon finds out that the people are being control and he would have to get by these Morlocks in order to go back to his own time.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen alter Klassiker ... und ein absolutes Muß!, 24. März 2006
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Time Machine (Taschenbuch)
The Time Machine ist echt klasse. Das Zukunftszenario das H.G. Wells hier ausmalt hat schon viele Leser gefesselt und inspiriert, mich auch. Auch wenn einige Details seltsam anmuten weil Technik heute anders aussieht als 1895 kann man sich gut in die Story hinein versetzen. Das "Endzeit" Szenario rund um die Morlocks und Eloi. Der Tag das Oben die Nacht unter der Erde. Das Böse im Untergrund, überlegen in seiner Einfachheit. Die lieblichen Eloi als Kühe an der Oberfläche, dazu Zeugen vergangener Kulturen. Das ist einfach gut und darum auch heute immer noch lesenswert. Die rund 120 Seiten sind schnell verschlungen, auch im englischen Original.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen I saw the movie first. The book difference was a surprise., 31. August 2005
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Time Machine (Taschenbuch)
An unnamed time traveler sees the future of man (802,701 A.D.) and then the inevitable future of the world. He tells his tale in detail.
I grew up on the Rod Taylor /George Pal movie. When I started the book I expected it to be slightly different with a tad more complexity as with most book/movie relationships. I was surprised to find the reason for the breakup of species (Morlock and Eloi) was class Vs atomic (in later movie versions it was political). I could live with that but to find that some little pink thing replaced Yvette Mimieux was too munch.
After al the surprises we can look at the story as unique in its time, first published in 1895, yet the message is timeless. The writing and timing could not have been better. And the ending was certainly appropriate for the world that he describes. Possibly if the story were written today the species division would be based on eugenics.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Klassischer Dystopia-Roman, 5. Juni 2001
H.G. Wells zeigt in seinem Roman, wie die Welt der Zukunft aussehen könnte. Der Schwerpunkt liegt nicht in den technischen Details der Zeitmaschine, sondern in der Beschreibung der sozialen Verhältnisse der Zukunft. Dieser Roman ist spannend geschrieben, der Mittelteil zieht sich allerdings ein wenig in die Länge.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Faszinierende und beängstigende Zukunftsvision aus den Wurzeln der englischen Industrialisierung, 23. Oktober 2008
Von 
Heli An - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 1000 REZENSENT)    (VINE®-PRODUKTTESTER)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Time Machine (Taschenbuch)
Der namenlose Zeitreisende schafft das, was die Menschen schon seit langem fasziniert: die Reise durch die vierte Dimension...die Zeit. Auf der Suche nach einer großen Weisheit,die das Jetzt positiv beeinflussen könnte, springt er 800.000 Jahre in die Zukunft und findet eine degenerierte Gesellschaft kindähnlicher, naiver Menschen vor (Eloi), die neben ihrem sonnigen und völlig gedankenlosen Leben nur Abends von einer namenlosen Urangst in große Hallen getrieben werden.

Bald entdeckt er den Grund dafür. Es gibt eine zweite Rasse, die Morlocks, welche unterirdisch leben und anscheinend die oberirdischen Eloi wie "Herdentiere" halten.

Mit knapper Not entflieht der Zeitreisende dieser Welt, reist in einer intensiv beschriebenen und erlebten Passage noch weiter in eine immer leerer werdende Zukunft bis zum Ende aller Dinge...von einem vereisten, einsamen Planeten kehrt er zurück in die Gegenwart, um am Folgetag für immer zu verschwinden.

Dabei macht sich der Protagonist tiefe und sinnige sozialkritische Gedanken, wie sich eine Gesellschaft bestehend aus reicher Oberschicht und armer Unterschicht zu dieser Vision hin entwickeln kann. Leider sind seine Gedanken sehr schlüssig und man kann das Bild nicht ganz ausschließen, zumal der Autor das Bild in so weite Zukunft projiziert hat, daß wirklich alles möglich ist. Die meisten anderen Sci Fi Romane enden doch so, daß die Zeit für uns noch faßbar ist. Beängstigend übrigens, wie H.G: Wells das Thema Global Warming und Artenverlust projeziert hat. Vielleicht werden auch andere Visionen wahr?

Fazit: ein sehr, sehr gutes Werk, welches aufgrund seiner Kürze auch mit wenig Zeit bequem gelesen werden kann. Das Buch besticht in seiner Einfachheit. Verfilmungen, welche weitere Rahmenhandlungen dazudichten oder den Horror in den Vordergrund stellen sind einfach verfälschend. Ich rate in jedem Fall zum original Buch!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Dystopische Horrorvision der Zukunft, 11. Juni 2008
Von 
A. Wolf (Wiesbaden) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Wie wird die Zukunft in tausenden von Jahren aussehen? Wie und wohin wird sich die Menschheit entwickeln? Diese Fragen hat sich kein Schriftsteller so intensiv gestellt, wie Herbert George Wells. Keiner hat sie so schonungslos sachlich beantwortet. Keiner so hintergründig. Im Jahr 1895 erschien der bahnbrechende Roman "The Time Machine" erstmals in Buchform. Bis zum heutigen Tag einer der populärsten, prägendsten - und gewiss einer der besten - Romane der Science Fiction. H. G. Wells war es, der erstmals das Motiv der Zeitreise in die Literatur einführte und Wells war es, der erstmals das dazu nötige Instrument erschuf: die Zeitmaschine. Sein technisches Verständnis, sein klarer Blick in Zeiten der zunehmenden ethisch-moralischen Unsicherheit am Fin de Siècle und sein schriftstellerisches Talent erzählen den Lesern noch heute eine Geschichte, die verstört, die unterhält und die uns erstaunlich viel über das Menschsein zu verraten vermag.

Die Geschichte: Im Kreise einiger Freunde berichtet ein mit Namen nicht genannter Zeitreisender schier Unglaubliches. Eine von ihm konstruierte Zeitmaschine führte ihn ins Jahr 802701. Das Themsetal ist nicht länger ein urbaner Moloch, sondern ein idyllisches, paradiesisches Kleinod. Üppige Früchte versorgen die Eloi, ein naives, von schwächlicher Statur gekennzeichnetes Volk, mit allem, was es benötigt. Ihr scheinbar glückliches, wenn auch sinnentleertes Dasein, wird nur vor einer immensen Furcht vor der Finsternis durchbrochen. Denn die Dunkelheit, das ist die Zeit der Morlocks, hässlicher und - wie es zunächst den Anschein hat - unterdrückter, proletarischer Wesen, die im Untergrund gewaltige Maschinen zu bedienen scheinen, welche das glückliche Dasein auf der Oberfläche offenbar erst ermöglichen. Doch der Zeitreisende vermutet falsch: die Morlocks sind die Herrscher. Sie halten sich die Eloi in sklavischer Gefolgschaft wie Zuchtvieh. Der Diebstahl der Zeitmaschine lässt eine Rückkehr des Zeitreisenden aussichtslos erscheinen, doch aus Liebe zu Weena, einer der Eloi und zugleich von Ekel ergriffen, erkämpft sich der Zeitreisende den Weg durch ein ganzes Heer von Morlocks. Seinem ausgürlichen Bericht folgt eine zweite Zeitreise, von der er schließlich nicht mehr zurückkehrt.

Eine Menschheit, die sich in zwei Arten aufgespalten hat: Kannibalen auf der einen Seite, ihre naiven Opfer auf der anderen. So kann sie aussehen, die mögliche Zukunft des Proletariats, das sich gegen die höhere Klasse erhoben hat. Dies ist eine der vielen Lesarten des Romans. Rätselhaft - ähnlich dem Sphinxtempel, der im Roman auftaucht - bleibt die Frage nach dem Ursprung dieser evolutionären Teilung zwischen den Eloi und den Morlocks. Wann ist dies geschehen, wie ist dies geschehen?

Eine interessante Frage, doch entscheidend ist sie nicht. Eindeutig klar ist nur, dass die Grenze zwischen Mensch und Tier sehr schmal ist. Losgetreten von Darwin erlebte das ausgehende 19. Jahrhundert einen Zustand der völligen Unsicherheit und Verschwommenheit, den Max Nordau in seiner Schrift "Entartung" (1892) folgendermaßen formulierte: "Über die Erde kriechen tiefer und tiefer werdende Schatten und hüllen die Erscheinungen in ein geheimnisvolles Dunkel, das alle Gewißheiten zerstört und alle Ahnungen gestattet. Die Formen verlieren ihre Umrisse und lösen sich in fließende Nebel auf."

Auf diese Bestandsaufnahme ließ sich vielfach reagieren. Künstler wie Oscar Wilde oder Aubrey Beardsley machten daraus einem weitgehend moralfreien Ästhetizismus, Wells setzte dem etwas anderes entgegen. Er gelangte zu seiner eigenen Sicht auf die negative, die umgekehrte Evolution: die Degeneration. So lesen wir im Epilog:

"And I have by me, for my comfort, two strange white flowers - shriveled now, and brown and flat and brittle - to witness that even when mind and strength had gone, gratitude and mutual tenderness still lived on in the heart of man."

Die paar wenigen Dinge, die geniun menschlich in uns sind, sie dürfen nie vergessen werden. Der pure Glaube an die Macht der Evolution, er wird schließlich eine Epoche einleiten, in der es keine Menschen mehr gibt, nur eine karge, rötliche Mondlandschaft, bewohnt von gewaltigen, rohen Tieren, denen ein trostloses Leben unter einer schwachen Sonne am Ende aller Zeiten beschieden sein wird. Der Wells-Leser wird im Werk des großen Phantasten immer wieder an diese schmale Schwelle zwischen Mensch und Tier stoßen. Dieses unberechenbare Gefahrenmoment. Dieses animalische Es, allein im Zaum gehalten von Moral und Ethik. Man denke hier insbesondere an "Die Insel des Dr. Moreau".

Fazit: Der Text wurde von Wells als "scientific romance" klassifiziert - was heißt, dass man dem Erzählten wenig Glauben schenken darf. Das ist britisches Understatement pur, denn die erste literarische Zeitreise riskiert nicht nur einen prophetischen Blick, sondern sagt darüber hinaus viel über das Menschsein aus. Über die erhebliche Bedeutung moralischer Prinzipien. Wells hätte sicher nicht behauptet, dass dieses Etwas von Gott kommt. Doch ebenso ist klar, dass die Evolution kein hinreichendes Erklärungsmuster für den Menschen ist, der sich in seinem Wesen von allen anderen Tieren eben allenfalls durch seine Ethik unterscheidet.

Verfilmt wurde das Werk mehrfach, zwei Adaptionen müssen erwähnt werden. George Pals Adaption von 1960 wurde selbst zum Sci-Fi-Klassiker. Hier gefällt die moralische Kälte der Eloi und eine weitgehend werkgetreue Umsetzung. Simon Wells, ein Nachfahre H.G. Wells drehte 2002 eine Art Remake des Films von George Pal. Die Zukunft ist hier das Ergebnis einer Umwelt-Katastrophe. Kaum ein Film fällt so auseinander wie dieser, ist man geneigt, den ersten 50 Minuten eine uneingeschränkte Bestnote zu geben, driftet der zweite Teil in eine allfällig-hollywoodkonforme, weichgespülte Mär vom Gut gegen Böse ab.

Das alles sollte dem Roman keinen Abbruch tun. Er ist auch über 100 Jahre nach seinem Erscheinen noch aktuell, fesselnd und - selbstredend - ein absoluter Lesegenuss.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen A thrilling, puzzling future materialises in your head, 14. September 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Time Machine (Taschenbuch)
H.G. Wells's Time Machine is the novel which was to influence Utopian novels, Dystopian novels and Science Fiction to a degree that it is justified to call him the father of the modern era of these genres. A time traveller embarks on a journey into the year 800 000, where he is faced with one of mankind's possible futures. Earth has turned into a paradise, small fragile creatures of enchanting beauty play in a garden full of breathtaking beauty. Flowers and plants have evolved into perfection, all evil creatures, vermin and weeds have disappeared. After the initial wonders though, the timetraveller slips from dream into a nightmare. The world is ruled by the Morlocks, hairy creatures with sparkling red eyes, who have descended from the English working class of the 19th century. The permanent work in underground factories has made them adapt to darkness. They took over the responsibility for the elaborate machinery which keeps the world stable. The former aristocratic class have developed into the Eloi, the degenerated beautiful childlike people described before. The timetraveller is drawn into the struggle between the classes and painfully discovers what may become of our world. Wells combines socialist and Darwinist ideas to draw a gloomy and shocking picture of the future. However ingenious his story and his ideas may be, what makes the novel outstanding is its litary qualities. He describes the utopian world so detailed and vividly that once you have started reading the book you are caught in Wells's imagination. When the timetraveller fights against the Morlocks in a dark grove, it is virtually impossible to escape the effect of this scene. You will inevitably start taking your bedside table lamp and beat up whoever is close to you at the time. If you have decided to give the book a try, then be aware that Morlocks and Eloi will be part of your life forever. They will haunt you whenever you succumb to lazyness in your life. (Dies ist eine Amazon.de an der Uni-Studentenrezension.)
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 210 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

The Time Machine (Bantam Classics)
The Time Machine (Bantam Classics) von H.G. Wells (Taschenbuch - 1. Januar 1984)
EUR 3,80
Auf Lager.
In den Einkaufswagen Auf meinen Wunschzettel
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen