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4.0 von 5 Sternen 2001: An author's view
I thought that the book was excellent. I gave it four stars for many reasons, which include the suspense, the way the author used his imagination, and for the description. To start, this book was written a long time ago. Man had just walked on the moon, and from there space exploration had no limits. Clarke had an image of what he thought the world would be like...
Veröffentlicht am 10. Mai 2000 von Adam McCleish

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3.0 von 5 Sternen Will this review be considered blasphemy??
Well written but lacking in the scope, vision, majesty, and impact of Kubrick's supreme cinematic artwork. The story is far too literal, and the mystery and awe of the film is reduced to readily explainable scientific phenomena (eg in the film, the monolith is representative of many things: evolutionary forces, the unknown, etc, etc. In the book it becomes a mere...
Am 1. Dezember 1998 veröffentlicht


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4.0 von 5 Sternen 2001: An author's view, 10. Mai 2000
Von 
I thought that the book was excellent. I gave it four stars for many reasons, which include the suspense, the way the author used his imagination, and for the description. To start, this book was written a long time ago. Man had just walked on the moon, and from there space exploration had no limits. Clarke had an image of what he thought the world would be like thirty years from when he lived. He saw people living on the moon and flights that took less than an to dock with a space station. It is fun to read how he portrayed what he thought today would be like. The second thing is the suspense. It keeps you reading and you just can't wait to see what happens. What is HAL going to do next? It is a real "on the edge of your seat" type book. I never saw the movie, but I would recommend seeing it after reading the book. Finally, the description of everything. He describes everything so well. From going to the bathroom in space, to what they found on the moon, you get a clear picture of what is going on in your head. He uses words very nicely. I took one star for only one reason. That was the dragging of the book. It kind of contributes to the suspense. It takes so long from one scene to the next. There is, I thought, a lot of unneeded information. Like the part when he is reading the newspaper on the plane. Overall, I thought it was a good book and I recommend it to anyone. 5-9-00
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5.0 von 5 Sternen a classic, 12. Januar 2004
Von Ein Kunde
Arthur C. Clarke is one of my favourite SF authors. I saw the movie and started reading the book years ago but never finished and never understood why it was such a big success. But after reading nearly all of his other books I thought I would give this one another try and to my surprise I loved it! It is really a good book, though some parts are outdated and have been done so often by other SF authors since this book has been written that some ideas seem old now (though they weren't when the book was first published). But that's only a minor drawback, it still is quite enjoyable and HAL is one of my favourite computer in a novel ever.
I can only recommend it esp. for people who watched to movie and thought 'What was that all about?' The book gives some answers.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen A Fine Book, but nowhere near as "great" as its reputation, 14. März 2000
While I consider the Kubrick film one of the most profound, hypnotic, beautiful, and astonishing movies ever made, I never got around to reading the Clarke book until a few days ago. Since it is a short novel written in a conventional narrative style, I read it in just an hour or two. While Clarke's expansion on life at "The Dawn of Man" is gripping and imaginative, and the descriptions as a whole are phenomenal, this story is much more impressive in the film. One of the major problems with the book are the utterly flat, dull characters. Clarke may be a master conceptualist of the Infinite, but his understandings of the ordinary human mind are a bit vague. Every character in the book serves a strictly narrative function and no more. Dave Bowman has to be one of the blandest main characters in modern fiction, Frank Poole and Dr. Floyd are no more than ciphers, and the remaining inhabitants of the book are basically a string of names and no more. I know that Kubrick deliberately exploited this aspect of the story in the film, exaggerating the banality of human interactions beneath the shimmering veneer of our advanced technologies (and suggesting as well that not much has changed in the day-to-day activities of the human race since its earliest times) to underscore the idea that humanity has become stagnant and is ready for the next "phase". Frankly, both Kubrick and Clarke are guilty of exalting an abstract idea of "humanity" (which, I must say, does not really seem to include women) or "mankind" over the messy, emotional and fleshly reality that is our lot. Ultimately, I found this book very disturbing for the following reasons: its blatant worship of authority and technology, and its impoverished view of human relationships. It is no wonder that Clarke's book still resonates with confused adolescents: this is the perfect book for insecure, alienated teen-agers who really don't want to grow up and become part of the human race. Nevertheless, I do give the book 4 stars because of the vastness and intelligence of its concept - there aren't that many popular novels which make you think about the enormity of the universe. I just wish that Clarke's vision of the ultimate in human potential did not entail total submission to one dominant male or another.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen A Thought Provoking Read, 16. Dezember 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: 2001: A Space Odyssey (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Arthur C Clarke's 2001 is probably his most famous book to date due to the remarkable movie made by Stanley Kubrik, but it is definitely not his best. To me, it is written in the same vein as his earlier novels such as Childhood's End and the City and the Stars, but for sheer majesty of language and relevence today, 2001 cannot stand up to his previous works.
I agree that 2001 was an extremely enjoyable and oftentimes thought provoking read. However, this cannot disguise the fact that several portions of the novel have not dated very well. The portions about the NASA scientist's flight into orbit and docking at moonbase seemed rather mundane in the face of recent technological developments, though admittedly at the time of publication, 5 years before the moon landing it must seem spectacular.
Much more successful are his descriptions of the dull monotony of the mission to Saturn, which ultimately ends in disaster. HAL 9000 is enigmatedly wrought and even at the end we are still unsure of whether he indeed developed intelligence.
To me, the most successful portion of the novel is the ending, which is truly awe inspiring. I found his descriptions majestic, so much so that I myself had difficulty envisioning such wonders.
2001 is definitely a thought provoking read. Clarke makes us wonder as to the nature of evolution with his revelation that humans received extraterrestrial help in prehistory. We wonder if man is to advance further, he must receive help from the stars.
It is true that 2001 develops rather slowly, but I rather liked the way it was written, slowly revealing the answer to the monolith, only for us to uncover even more enigmas. The ending is rather enigmatic and for me chilling, when the starchild mirrors moondancer's words at the end of the first section of the book:
He was now the master of his world. He did not know what to do, but in time he would find out.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen A very good collaboration with Stanley Kubrick, 23. August 1999
First, let me recommend watching the movie before reading the book. The book is much more powerful after you have tried to puzzle the meaning of the monolith for yourself. Then, if you did not understand the movie, or want clarification on certain points, this book is the place to turn. It answered my two main questions: "What did the story of HAL 9000 have to do with the story of the monolith?" and "What did the ending mean?"
Unless you are a fan of the old school of "hard" science fiction, you'll probably be annoyed by Clarke's overly-expository writing style and obsessive devotion to scientific accuracy. This story was obviously written when the science was much more important than the fiction. At times, it reads like an astronomy textbook. But, in the end, all your questions from the movie will be answered. If you like the answers, you'll like the book. If you enjoyed "figuring out" the movie, the book will spoil the mystery for you.
In the final analysis, this novel deserves high marks because without it the classic film would never have been made, or at least would have turned out much differently. In his companion book "The Lost Worlds of 2001," Clarke describes how the movie and novel were developed simultaneously with feedback in both directions. Clarke would write a chunk of the story, Kubrick would film it, then Clarke would revise what he had written to parallel the movie. Both Clarke and Kubrick wanted the movie and the novel to be viewed as one collaborative effort, even though there are some minor discrepancies between the two. The story was originally inspired by Clarke's much older short story "The Sentinel".
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5.0 von 5 Sternen One of the greatest books of all time, 29. April 1998
I consider 2001: A Space Odyssey to be one of the greatest books of all time. It is not often in life that you come across a book which profoundly changes the way you think. Yet that was its effect on me when i first read it as a young teenager. I have re-read it many times since, and it is as inspirational and haunting each time. The book is sheer perfection.
Consider the time when it was written - at the dawn of the space race when travelling to the moon seemed scarcely possible, when computer technology was still rudimentary, when the possibility of life elsewhere in the universe was still largely a joke to the majority of the world population, before the field of artificial intelligence took off, when the details of space travel, space communications and other planets were still basic. For those of us born after this time, i don't believe we can ever accurately understand what it must have been like.
Consider the practical, realistic, scientific vision that 2001 provides. A breath-taking, awe-inspiring vision, that sweeps us along from primitive human life to what we are now and to what we may become. The issues that the book examines are as relevant and topical today as in the 1960s: the possibility of machine intelligence and the associated ethical dilemmas; the possibilities and problems of working with computers which provide crucial advice and make important decisions; the practical details of undertaking a long space voyage (the psychological impact on the travellers and their families back home, the communication difficulties, the vast amount of time to fill, the small crew each dependent upon the others, the lack of privacy, food and exercise, repairs and maintenance, loneliness and isolation); the possibility of different forms of existence; the possibility of first contact with other life forms; and the possibility of encountering the completely unknown.
The finale is mind-blowing... unsurpassable. Alone, isolated, at the frontier between the known and the unknown, terrified and exhilerated, after an epic, frightening journey. "Oh my God - its full of stars", is surely one of the most memorable lines ever written.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Dated, but still very good, 3. März 2000
Von 
R. Wallace "Bob Wallace" (St. Louis, Mo USA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: 2001: A Space Odyssey (Gebundene Ausgabe)
I read this novel when I was about 13, and at that time thought it was great. But after rereading it many years later, I have to revise my opinion. It, unfortunately, is showing its age. One thing that Clarke does (and it is very tiresome) is portray aliens as God. The late Carl Sagan did the same thing. For all the science and supposedly rationality in science fiction, it is in many ways a religious genre. Another problem (and it is another tired cliche) is the belief we were engineered by these God-like aliens. Somehow Clarke portrays early Man as so astonishingly stupid he can't figure out he can eat animals--even though he sees animals see people all the time. Then there is the problem of HAL, the sentient but murderously insane computer. Mechanical Artificial Intelligence is apparently an impossibility. On the other hand, biological AI may be possible. Clarke can be forgiven this, since he wrote in the middle 1960's. There are much better science fiction novels that deal with similar themes, notably Alfred Bester's _The Stars My Destination._ But to pick this book up in your early teens--oh, yes, it is worth it. It stretches your mind, introduces you to concepts that have never occured to you, gives me the 'sense of wonder' that is inherent in good science fiction. But if you've already read a lot of science fiction, and _then_ read this, you may be mildly disappointed.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Wonderful science fiction novel, 6. Mai 1999
Von Ein Kunde
A strange object is found on the moon, strange waves travel through space towards Saturn, a computer tries to take over the mission... These are just a few of the events that occur in Arthur Clark's "2001: A Space Odessey. A large piece of alien material is found buried deep inside the body of the moon. Scientists believed that it's age is around three million years. Its finding is kept very secret and governments from around the world try to keep it that way. A group of scientists is sent to study why the big, black object on the Moon sent waves towards Saturn. On the way, they run into many obstacles leading to an incredible climax.
In "2001: A Space Odyssey," setting is a very important part of Clark's book. Since it is set in the future, a lot of description is needed to establish an atmosphere that the reader has never seen. Clark describes the Discovery spaceship, it's shape, it's contents, it's feel; he writes about the space stations, and the planets using vivid metaphors and details. When the main character is describing the planet Saturn, you feel like you are there with him, looking out the space craft window. Although his writing is very rich and almost vibrant, his visions are so complex that it can be difficult to grasp his ideas and to really picture them in your mind. If you enjoy exciting science fiction, this is the book for you!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen For a Evolutionary thrill and chill this book is set for all, 16. November 1998
Von Ein Kunde
This is one of the greatest books of all time. The Author wrote this with the most brilliant image of space travel and horror mixed into a highly top secret discovery mission. This is one of the only books I could say that I understood it for its fullest and I would like to reccommend it to anyone who loves a highly intelectual and errie plot. Author C. Clarke wrote this book with hardly any dialouge and the book has one of the greatest plots and is the most interesting book os all-time. 2001: A Space Odyssey is a look of human evolution and the becoming of man to a discovery on the moons of mars. I also like the way the author made it an Odyssey and not just an ordinary investigation of a discovery. It was a very scarry book and made me (the reader) think a lot about the coming of man and the discovery and technology we are hoping to see as a race. The book is excellent along with the movie. I would say the book explains more about the mission and the adventure and danger of the space travel to the moons of Saturn. The movie was concidered a masterpeace the book is a thing of art and understanding. If you love books which are unspected and very mind visioul i would get this book as soon as possible the book is one of the greatest science fition books of our time and of any time. It is a sure masterpiece. Also a book you will enjoy and think about.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen what is "inteligent" life?, 22. Juli 1997
Von Ein Kunde
A superior science fiction novel that is based in science fact and thought out inscience fiction. Everyone has there own veiw on what the book truly represents; yet most, myself included, agree that it is based on the quetion: what makes us different from other primates?

Clarke attempts to answer this with a fictionus account on what started it all. But how much fiction is is...

The next question: what is this "intelligence" we have that others do not seem to posses,a and how would we know we know it when we say it? Clarke answers this question in the form of HAL. The arficialy intelligent computer onboard <i>Discovery</i>, the ship carrying Bowman and Poole and 4 hipernauts headed for Saturnanian moon, Japetus. The only crew meber onboard who knows exactly why is HAL, who becomes dangeroussly obbsessive with his sole reason in "life", to get to Japetus and carry out the mission. He feels he could do it better wthout the crew. So acts upon those thoughts.

And the final question: whart would other intelleigent life be like outside our own planet? Clarke answers this with what was Bowman, now the Star Child immortal.

This is a book for anyone interisted in astronomy and the the querstion of who we are. Truly one hell of a book.
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2001: A Space Odyssey
2001: A Space Odyssey von Arthur C. Clarke (Taschenbuch - 1. September 2000)
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