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32 von 33 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Check out the philosophy; give the cult a miss
Ayn Rand's magnum opus is definitely worth a read. A word of warning: this is not a typical novel. Be prepared for a world-view that you have not seen anywhere else. As you can see from the reviews below, Ms. Rand is loved--and hated--by many. My advice to anyone about to dive into her works: read it critically, but with an open mind. Let yourself be drawn into...
Veröffentlicht am 2. Mai 1999 von John Palchak (jkp108@yahoo.com)

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1.0 von 5 Sternen I OVERCAME MY ADDICTION TO OBJECTIVISM!
I read this book back when I was 19, during the last phase of my teenage angst and hatred of life and the world. It should come as no surprise that I found this book to be an invaluable tool. It fit in perfectly with all my convoluted and misguided emotions. Not only did it justify my hate, it gave me a plethora of people, ideas, philosophies, and things to despise...
Veröffentlicht am 25. Juli 2000 von Foot Artist


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4.0 von 5 Sternen Check out the philosophy; give the cult a miss, 2. Mai 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Atlas Shrugged (Taschenbuch)
Ayn Rand's magnum opus is definitely worth a read. A word of warning: this is not a typical novel. Be prepared for a world-view that you have not seen anywhere else. As you can see from the reviews below, Ms. Rand is loved--and hated--by many. My advice to anyone about to dive into her works: read it critically, but with an open mind. Let yourself be drawn into her fictional universe and exalt in the struggles and triumphs of her characters. Do not, however, assume that because Ayn Rand said it, it must be true. Do not let yourself enter the personality cult that has been constructed around her by Peikoff & Co. Above all keep in mind--despite what she and her cult followers say--her philosophy is merely an outline with many incomplete technical areas. That does not mean what she has to say isn't worthwhile--it IS!--but that you will need to work at it to integrate the good things that Rand has to say with your own practical experience. What's the book about? Well, to boil it all down (and not give too much away) it begins as the story of a woman who runs a railroad company, struggling to keep her company prosperous in a dark and uncertain time. There is much, much more to the book than this...but this is how it begins. I only give the book four stars because it was quite long and, frankly, at times it was plodding. Overall though, it is an excellent novel with a revolutionary message. I think everyone ought to give it a read at least once in their lives!
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Influential, 9. November 2003
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Atlas Shrugged (Taschenbuch)
In an opinion poll of the US Library of Congress this was found out to be the second most influential book of history in the US, after the Bible.
I am currently in Buenos Aires, and here in Argentina it is only this year that an uncensored version of this book is published for the first time, and this almost 50 years after its first publication in the US. That should tell you something about its controversial nature.
As for the story, I am sure that the many other critiques of this book have given you a rough idea about it. Personally, I have always found many of the issues and speeches in the book to be somewhat redundant, and the fervor with which the Objectivists defend the book to be just a tad hysterical. To criticize the book or the author is akin to blasphemy in the eyes of many Randroids.
The problem in my view has always been that, as Rand herself once said, this is more of a philosophical exposee than a literary novel, and that shows quite often. As far as literary works go, the author's previous novel 'The Fountainhead' is far superior. The philosophy is the same, but the author concentrated on the story first, instead of worrying solely about how to propagate her philosophy.
Regardless of whether or not you agree with Mrs. Rand's views, this book is too important to simply ignore. It would be like ignoring the Communist Manifesto, just because you are an anti-communist, or the Bible because you are an atheist. For all collectivists: 'Know Thy Enemy', and for all individualists: 'Get it' if for no other reason than its importance for the individualist and libertarian movement. Individualism has too few advocates as it is, and this book has quite possibly laid the foundations of a rivival of the old liberal tradition in the decades after its first publication.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A book that will change your life...in more ways than one, 21. Juni 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Atlas Shrugged (Taschenbuch)
Who is John Galt? A universal question. Who is this man that threatened to stop the "motor of the world?"
Is capitalism "evil?" Is the desire to build a better mousetrap, and prove it, so bad? Is subservience, masquerading under the pseudonym of alturism, so noble?
See for yourself, and make your own judgement.
For me, as I read "Atlas Shrugged", I found myself able to only read a few chapters at a time, having to put the book down, in anger at the situations presented in the book, and recognizing that all of us, whether we dare to admit it or not, believe that recognition should be earned, via our efforts, and not just platitudes to satisfy the masses.
If only to stir the emotions of a true individualist, this should be must reading for anyone who is not satisfied with the status quo, but truly seeks a better world.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen A thought inducing experience set in a two-dimensional world, 1. März 2000
It is generally acknowledged that Atlas Shrugged is more of an application of her Objectivism in a story format than a traditonal novel. This is a good thing, since as a novel, this book falls short. The characters are very two-dimensional and the plot was badly structured. I'm not opposed to a lengthy book, but Atlas Shrugged is too long, longer than it needed to be. The dialogue, the plot twists and the ideas are all repeated over and over again, beating the reader over the head with a message that, in essence, is quite simple. Even the characters are repetive, it quickly becomes difficult to discern differences between any of the "good guys". Midas Mulligan, Ellis Wyatt, Ken Danagger, Francisco D'Anacondia, Hank Rearden and even John Galt all seem so similar, one wonders why Rand even bothered coming up with different names for what is essentially the same character. The "bad guys" are even less inspired: Kip Chalmers, Wesley Mouch, Tinky Holloway, Jim Taggart, Dr. Ferris... after the first ten chapters, one is inclined not even to bother learning any of their names.
But the redeeming quality of this book is the excellent job it does of making the reader think. I've not yet read a book that brought me to a level of introspection as deep as this one did. And while I don't agree with some of Rand's views, most of the ideas presented seemed very true, or atleast, upon examination, lead to a realization of truths. And even though Ayn Rand's philosophical rants become repetetious, every diatribe, whether delivered by Galt, D'Anacondia or Haley, leaves the reader with some new insight and forces him or her to examine all the ramifications of Objectivism. This book is definitely Anti-socialist, and with communism failing in Russia since its publication, it seems almost prophetic in that regard. However, I would not call it anti-religious as it seems Rand is not opposed to religion in general but rather the mysticism some of its followers resort to. We've all seen the yahoos Rand describes on the street corners, testifying that the state of the world is God's own retribution for our insolence, and they have very little to do with the actual teachings of Christ.
All in all, Atlas Shrugged is a very interesting book, that makes the reader think and think deeply, and which is sometimes dull only in its execution.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Awesome! But let every objectivist admit, it's too long..., 20. Juli 1999
Von Ein Kunde
I just finished Atlas Shrugged today. Wow, was that every a long read, and I mean long. I've read Fountainhead and own almost all of her works. She is an inspiration to the freemarketer and the person who craves justice in a putrid mess of a world. But I will admit some stuff to the people who hate this book. Ayn Rand isn't that great a literay novelist. While her books are inspirational and such, they are way too drawn out and half the book (at least) could have been cut out and nothing taken away from the book itself. She needed to listen to her editor a little more, although from her character of Howard Roard I doubt she ever did.... Oh well. Ayn socialist, I'd dare you to read it and see the bankrupting principles of your moral system. Oh and one last thing, I am one of those evil mystics she rants about- a Christian. While I struggle with my belief in God, I believe she was irrational for her disbelieve in God. Although it does sadden me that I will probably spend eternity in Heaven with Jerry Falwell, while Ayn Rand is frying in Hell, we can only hope she repented before death, but somehow I doubt it.
Mark Penner
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Atlas is shrugging, 13. Mai 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Atlas Shrugged, published in 1957, is known as Ayn Rand's magnum opus, and the
reasons for this honor are easily found within the pages of the book. The novel challenges
thousands of years of altruism and collectivism in human civilization. Atlas Shrugged is
Ayn Rand's tribute to the men of the mind: scientists, philosophers, businessmen, artists,
teachers. The novel unites metaphysics, ethics, economics and romantic love. The integration of theme, plot, characterization and style are unparalleled by any other philosophi-
cal work of the century. These elements, combined with the novel's scope and depth, lead
the reader into Ayn Rand's world, where he discovers and enters the lost Atlantis, a world
of moral giants.
Stated briefly, the theme of Atlas Shrugged is the role of the mind in man's existence. In the one thousand-plus pages of the novel, Ayn Rand sets forth all of values upon
which her philosophy, Objectivism, is based. In "About the Author," Rand tells the
reader: "My philosophy, in essence, is the concept of man as a heroic being, with his own
happiness as the moral purpose of his life, with productive achievement as his noblest
activity, and reason as his only absolute." Near the beginning of his radio address to the
world, John Galt tells his audience: "You have sacrificed justice to mercy. You have
sacrificed independence to unity. You have sacrificed reason to faith. You have sacrificed
wealth to need. You have sacrificed self-esteem to self-denial. You have sacrificed hap-
piness to duty." For each virtue of Rand's philosophy which the world has given up, Galt
presents a vice which the world has turned to. It is because the world has turned to these
evils that it has deteriorated into the state of emergency presented in the novel.
Rand makes it very clear throughout the novel that the men of minds are central to
the existence and prosperity of mankind and without them, the world stops turning.
Without the men of minds, the weight of the world becomes too much to bear, even for
Atlas, the mythological man who holds the world on his shoulders:
"'Mr. Rearden,' said Francisco, his voice solemnly calm, "if you saw Atlas,
the giant who holds the world on his shoulders, if you saw that he stood,
blood running down his chest, his knees buckling, his arms trembling but
still trying to hold the world aloft with the last of his strength, and the
greater his effort the heavier the world bore down upon his shoulders--
what would you tell him to do?'
'I... I don't know. What... could he do? What would you tell him?'
'To shrug.'"
Atlas Shrugged is a mystery novel, not about the murder of a man,
but the murder of mankind's spirit and the struggle to bring it back. In Atlas Shrugged,
As a result of the decaying morality of the world, these industrialists, the men of the mind, go on strike. John Galt, the leader of the strike, told the world:
"There is only one kind of man who have never been on strike in human
history. Every other kind and class have stopped, when they so wished,
and have presented demands to the world, claiming to be indispensable--
except the men who have carried the world on their shoulders, have kept it
alive, have endured torture as sole payment, but have never walked out on
the human race. Well, their turn has come. Let the world discover who
they are, what they do and what happens when they refuse to function.
This is the strike of the men of the mind."
The men of the mind strike, hiding away together, in a hidden valley of the Rockies, where
they can earn the payment and respect they deserve for the work they do. Galt continues
to recruit industrialists, scientists, philosophers and artists to live in his valley until the
world is left with nothing but moochers and beggars. It is after the United States, and the
rest of the world, is in a state of total chaos, without any industry, transportation, or pro-
duction for people to live by, that Galt makes his three hour, sixty page speech to the
world. In it, he not only outlines why the world has crumbled into nothingness and why
he and the other men of the mind have gone on strike, but all of the morals which are the
underlying basis of Objectivism. Twelve years after John Galt begins his strike, it ends.
The lights go out in New York City, a sign the John Galt has stopped the motor of the
world, and the last of the striking minds return to their valley to begin rebuilding the
United States of America and then the world, this time under their own morals and prin-
ciples.
Ayn Rand's literary style is unlike that of any other modern novelist. Greco-Latinated words abound, each one conveying the perfect meaning. This use of language
almost helps to lead the reader into Rand's philosophical, highly intellectual world. . The
novel is filled with numerous amazingly descriptive passages, one of which describes
Dagny Taggart's first train ride on the John Galt Line: "The green-blue rails ran to meet
them, like two jets shot out of a single point beyond the curve of the earth. The crossties
melted, as the approached, into a smooth stream rolling down under the wheels." Ayn
Rand wrote a novel over one thousand pages long, and each word on each page of the
book is necessary, each sentence deepening the plot, increasing the reader's awareness of
the virtues within, and drawing him deeper into the world of Atlas Shrugged.
Many authors are able to draw a reader into their books while it is being read. Ayn
Rand draws her readers into her novel not only while it is being read, but after the book
has been set aside. Her characters never leave a reader's mind, her themes force the reader
to leave the world they live in so that they can continue to ponder what they mean. A
reader sees the "THE END" on the final page of the book and closes it, but knows that
those words mean nothing, that the ideas Rand presents will never end, and that he will
never forget why Atlas is shrugging.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Eine moderne Fabel die höchste Aufmerksamkeit verdient, 22. Mai 2012
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Atlas Shrugged (Taschenbuch)
Ayn Rands Buch ist aktueller denn je, weil die von ihr aufgezeigten Tendenzen der Ausbeutung der Leistungsträger und der Verlogenheit ihnen gegenüber seitens Politik und Massenmedien leider immer noch auf der Tagesordnung stehen.
Nur hat sie im Gegensatz zu Büchern wie Orwells Farm der Tiere keine Satire geschrieben, sondern einen Roman, der diese heroischen Figuren in den Rang Nietzschescher Übermenschen erhebt. Im Grunde läuft die Geschichte wie eines der Shakespear`schen Bildungsdramen a la Cymbeline ab; alles geht den Bach runter, doch am Ende finden die Hauptfiguren zueinander, die Bösen werden bestraft, die Halbbösen geläutert und die Guten erhöht.
Das liest sich durchaus sehr interessant, allerdings ist das Buch schlicht zu lang; die zentralen Thesen werden in endlosen Zwiegesprächen zwischen den Hauptfiguren und vor allem im unerträglich endlosen Monolog von John Galts Radioansprache ständig wiederholt. Zwei Drittel der Seiten hätten diesem Ausnahmewerk sehr gut getan, deswegen nur vier Sterne.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Rand dramatized her ideas, but she'd created better fiction, 25. September 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Atlas Shrugged (Taschenbuch)
Most of the hundreds of reader reviews are quite accurate about the individualistic, rationally egoistic, life-affirming philosophy that Rand conveys in this book -- and that goes for those who both love and hate her work. What few have discussed at any length are the merits of "Atlas" as fiction.
If you are interested in encountering Rand as a provocative author and literary stylist -- and it's an eminently worthwhile desire -- this is not the book with which to begin. Her earlier novel "The Fountainhead" (1943) is notably superior to "Atlas" (1957) in character shaping, plot construction, setting, and dramatic tension.
"Atlas" changed, while Rand was planning it, from a straightforward story -- about the creators of value withdrawing from society -- to a project that entailed the description of a "moral revolution," as Nathaniel Branden termed it. Rand felt the need to make the essence of her philosophy more explicit and detailed, in order to properly depict her heroic characters and what they believed.
Was that a genuine need? Within fiction, that is? Not in the wake of what she'd created earlier. The courtroom speech by Roark in "The Fountainhead" ended up genuinely dramatizing the essence of her philosophy, in how it was connected to the events of her plot, and in how it alluded to those Roark had defended or opposed. It didn't sit apart from the events that created the main conflict. The similar climactic speech in "Atlas," by contrast, is a piece existing on its own (though superbly self-integrated in its philosophic aims). It's set apart from the rest of her story, and unlike the shorter speeches of others earlier in the plot, it's not genuinely linked to the main events and characters.
This isn't a minimal distinction. With a few minor exceptions (some polemical pamphlets), Rand wrote fiction exclusively until 1955, by which time she had worked on "Atlas" for nine years. When she turned at that point to the major speech (itself requiring two years to formulate and write), she shifted gears and aimed her writing skills at the exposition of philosophy, not at dramatizing plots. She couldn't sustain her work of writing in both ways at the same time.
This makes "Atlas" into two books, not one. The book with a plot surrounds the book-length major speech in the heart of Part Three. One can see the rising and falling lines of Rand's talents, as she shifted interests. The most vivid and moving episode in the plot-book immediately precedes The Speech. (Rearden and the attack on his factory, and the young boy who attempts to prevent it.) The most conventional and least original plotting immediately follows The Speech and continues to the end of the novel, with almost visible efforts to tie up loose plot ends. (And in a use of overly transparent allegories, such as the main character being "crucified," albeit on a torture machine.)
To know this road map helps in negotiating what is a long and yet rewarding fictional path. Don't mistake me: Even when the plot was below her best efforts, Rand's dramatic sense exceeds all her contemporaries, and hearkens back to Hugo in its concentration of effects. Yet this book attempts to bridge the gap between fiction and philosophy, and ends up being a weaker effort in both areas. Rand wrote better fiction earlier, and (The Speech aside) better philosophy later.
"Atlas" is Dagny Taggart's story, much as "TF" was Howard Roark's. Rand was more adept at finding the greatness in human beings by looking at men than at women. She made little attempt to hide this point in her later nonfiction writings and interviews. Introspection was not her strong suit. This didn't mean that she was bad at it -- for Dagny is an intricate, passionate, complex character, the most compelling by far of Rand's female protagonists. Yet this woman writer fit better by far within the "skin" of a man such as Roark.
The secondary characters in "Atlas," with the exception of Francisco d'Anconia and his sardonic wit, don't match up to the detail and quality of those in the earlier book. The men in "Atlas" who sell their souls, such as Boyle, Ferris, and Stadler, are far less compelling and chilling than the delicate balance shown in Peter Keating, in Rand's earlier novel. Too many of those appearing on either moral side in "Atlas" shade into caricature, whether in Rand's descriptions or in their immersion into plot twists. The main hero of "Atlas," Hank Rearden, accepts far too many blows from those who are being parasites upon his values -- too many, that is, for a man possessing the strength of intellect that he is shown to use. By contrast, the earlier book's Gail Wynand, who is far less moral in what he has done, knows his weaknesses and is more realistically self-aware.
"Atlas" is set in an undefined time in the future, and the science-fiction touches have fallen short in 40 years (watch for the 35-inch TV set). The backbone of the story, using passenger railroads, also threatens to be anachronistic. Yet if a bit of "alternate universe" sensibility is used, thinking of this as a world of might-have-been that's even more bleak than our own, it becomes less of an obstacle to the present-day reader.
All of this aside, "Atlas" is a compelling, challenging, and dramatic work of fiction. If you want to genuinely understand Rand's strengths as a fiction artist, though, begin with her earlier novels.
And when you do read "Atlas," read it for the plot. Don't let the 70-page major speech slow you down ... skip it if you wish, absorb the essence of the plot, and then encounter it on your second reading. As with all of Rand's work, the perceptive reader will want to encounter it a second time, if only to appreciate the workings of her mind and the skills of a master dramatist.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Ayn Rand embodies her philosophy eloquently., 6. April 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Ayn Rand was eloquent and precise in her philosphy, as she was visionary and romantic in her works of fiction. If not read before, the reader will see the world through the eyes of Dagny Taggart, who's confusion but persistence leads her to discover the root of her own guilt: the sanction of the victim.
If read before, Atlas Shrugged will slowly reveal the manner by which John Galt learns to drain the world. Step by step, the reader will become increasingly aware of the subtle happenings in the plot, will grow anxious to enlighten Dagny and Rearden of the answers they seek, and will learn to identify with the frustrations of Francisco D'Anconia and John Galt in their love for Dagny.
In either case, the reader will trace the rising tension in the plot throughout the book, released when John Galt delivers his famous speech and voices his demands. Atlas Shrugged is a worthy novel, and a must read for all who consider their mind their greatest asset.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen It changed my way of looking at life, 29. November 1996
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Atlas Shrugged (Taschenbuch)
A love story. An adventure novel. A mystery. A philosophical treatise. When I read it, Atlas Shrugged set my soul on fire. In a world of injustice and irrationality, Atlas Shrugged shows a world of men as they can be and should be. A hymn to the nobility of man's spirit, Atlas Shrugged tells of a beautiful woman who runs a railroad and her quest for an ideal. It tells of an America in which looters and criminals in Washington try to smother the productive men of ability in this country. It tells of one man, who, in order to save the world, had to destroy those whom he loved most.
Upholding individualism, reason, and rational selfishness, Atlas Shrugged is not only a philosophical triumph, but a literary one as well. Ayn Rand's 1000-page masterpiece shows such integration, such skill -- every word was written and rewritten until the sound, the meaning, and the meter were not only perfect for the sentence, but for the entire book as well. Written with unimaginable passion, Atlas Shrugged elicits so much feeling on the part of the reader -- as I read it, certain phrases or sentences made me just lean back, close my eyes, and savor the words on my tongue.
Controversial, intellectually challenging, enthralling, exciting, and totally entertaining -- Atlas Shrugged shows Ayn Rand's genius as a writer and her ability as a storyteller. Each sentence conveys the content of her mind and the passion of her heart. Read this book and your life will never be the same.
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