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5.0 von 5 Sternen Bitte nicht die Geschichte verfälschen!
William Gibson hat mit diesem Roman eine Stilrichtung der Science Fiction in Gang gebracht, die es ohne ihn zweifelsfrei nicht geben würde. Die Begriffe Cyberspace und Matrix wurden sehr wohl hier zum ersten mal in der Bedeutung gebraucht, wie sie heutzutage verstanden werden.
Als ich dieses Buch vor vielen Jahren zum ersten Mal gelesen habe, hatte ich immer das...
Veröffentlicht am 4. März 2006 von R. Cafagna

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2.0 von 5 Sternen William Gibson has a problem with clarity.
In Neuromancer, William Gibson creates a setting that is at once fantastic and reasonable. The characters are perfectly jaded to the novel's advanced technology - plug in the toaster, jack into the matrix, ho humm. Unfortunately, when the narrator has seen it all before, he doesn't spend a lot of time describing what's happening. Gibson's narrator gives you a vague...
Veröffentlicht am 18. Januar 2000 von Chris Smith


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5.0 von 5 Sternen Bitte nicht die Geschichte verfälschen!, 4. März 2006
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R. Cafagna (Hannover) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Neuromancer (Remembering Tomorrow) (Taschenbuch)
William Gibson hat mit diesem Roman eine Stilrichtung der Science Fiction in Gang gebracht, die es ohne ihn zweifelsfrei nicht geben würde. Die Begriffe Cyberspace und Matrix wurden sehr wohl hier zum ersten mal in der Bedeutung gebraucht, wie sie heutzutage verstanden werden.
Als ich dieses Buch vor vielen Jahren zum ersten Mal gelesen habe, hatte ich immer das Gefühl, irgendwie nicht alles verstanden zu haben, was sicherlich auch mit der schlechten Übersetzung zu tun hatte. Da wird zum Beispiel "the Yakuza" mit "der Gängster" übersetzt, obwohl die Organisation Yakuza (so etwas wie die japanische Mafia) gemeint war.
Leider ist William Gibsons Literatur keine leichte Unterhaltung. Oftmals hat man am Ende der Geschichte das Gefühl, man sei jetzt genau so schlau wie vorher. Doch was mich an diesem Autoren so fesselt, ist seine stille und düstere Poesie und die Liebe zu seinen Figuren (und die Liebe, mit der er diese Figuren quält). Ich denke da zum Beispiel an den weiblichen Straßensamurai, Molly, die in der stümperhaften Verfilmung einer seiner Kurzgeschichten (Jonny Mnemonic), "Vernetzt" mit Keanu Reeves, so schändlich mißhandelt wurde. Aber das sei nur am Rande erwähnt.
Wer Science Fiction mag, und gerne wissen möchte, aus welchen Wurzeln Shadowrun, Neocron und natürlich auch die Matrix erwachsen sind, der sollte sich dieses Meisterwerk nicht entgehen lassen. Auch wenn es keine pure Unterhaltung ist.
Ich kann im Übrigen auch seine Idoru-Trilogie nur sehr empfehlen. William Gibson auf Urlaub so zusagen.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Gibson's work didn't cease to improve, but..., 3. Juli 2000
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John M. Thompson (Albuquerque, New Mexico) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: Neuromancer (Remembering Tomorrow) (Taschenbuch)
...this book breathes stylistic fire into a genre coasting on assumed scientific literacy. If the characters speak extensively in jargon adapted to technologies that don't yet exist, that's OK - in the present, shop talk not understood by general readership is a fact of any technical field, e.g. my mom browsing the magazine rack and struggling through paragraphs in _Wired_.
Besides, Gibson coined the term, "cyberspace," in this novel; most authors, even ones of talent, do not create words used commonly thereafter. To all the people who criticized him for using unique terminology, there's this great thing called context. Try using it.
One thing I have enjoyed about Gibson is his tendency to use protagonists and not heroes to view the events contained within his stories. I do not have any particular sympathy for the men and women who interact with Henry Dorsett Case in the course of his assigned task.
In the tradition of great noir fiction and film, there is no sense of resolution about anything. The characters who did not die return to their separate paths and continue about life in a world controlled through an invisible hand of corporate and technological pressures against traditional structures of power like government and organized crime. No great truths were revealed, and none were promised.
Have no doubt, Gibson is an original whether you enjoy his style or not. For an understanding of current trends in science fiction best reflected in the success of _The Matrix_, you can begin here and work your way through the other books.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Prophecy or fiction? You pick!, 25. März 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Neuromancer (Gebundene Ausgabe)
It took me some time to get started into this book--the
"imaginary" future Gibson has created is somewhat familiar,
yet bizarre enough to leave one grasping for understanding in the beginning pages. Once engrossed, I couldn't put it down! My constant back thought as I read was the absolute awe that I felt for Gibson's ability to envision a computer
world so 1990's true to life at a time when Apple had yet to
create their first Mac! Gibson's description of "jacking in" to the net, and "flipping" is so close to today's "logging on" and "quick-switching" that it gave me goosebumps each time he used the terms! Gibson was truly
touched by the muse of inspiration when writing "Neuromancer", and I'm sure we'll see more of his *prophecies* come to pass before the millenium.
This is advised reading for all who wish to understand the
potential of the internet and the World Wide Web. Just take it slow, by osmosis you'll get the scenario, and by the final chapter--you'll know the concept. You'll be awestruck
too, I guarantee!
Can't wait to read Count Zero and Mona Lisa Overdrive!

you
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2.0 von 5 Sternen William Gibson has a problem with clarity., 18. Januar 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Neuromancer (Remembering Tomorrow) (Taschenbuch)
In Neuromancer, William Gibson creates a setting that is at once fantastic and reasonable. The characters are perfectly jaded to the novel's advanced technology - plug in the toaster, jack into the matrix, ho humm. Unfortunately, when the narrator has seen it all before, he doesn't spend a lot of time describing what's happening. Gibson's narrator gives you a vague patchwork of the plot - it feels like a drunk's telling you about the movie he just watched. Further, Gibson makes no effort to tell the reader who is speaking. Gibson uses characters he doesn't introduce. Gibson rambles for so long you forget what he is writing about. Don't get me wrong - I feel that a reader should have to work with a book to understand it, but Gibson doesn't even give us a fighting chance.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Neuromancer is a contemporary classic, 14. Januar 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Neuromancer (Remembering Tomorrow) (Taschenbuch)
An avalanche of thousands of new books from all over the world reaches bookstores every year. When a (then) non-genre novel succeeds in standing out from the crowd as much as Neuromancer does, chances are it has that certain, hard to pinpoint something that makes it resonate with the reader.Neuromancer is one of these rare books, and certainly one that will not be forgotten for a very, very long time. Among Neuromancer's many outstanding and mold-breaking qualities is Gibson's crystalline techno-prose. As soon as you open the first page, you are sucked into a vibrant and detailed future and an unpredicatable and unconventional plot that may well constitute the most original and modern use of the age old protagonist on a quest idea. Gibson's future is detailed, realistic and feels immensely three dimensional, written with such conviction, that it comes to life from page one and takes on a life of its own, with its own conventions, culture and even brandnames. Once you have read it for sheer pleasure, go back and look deeper into the sociological implications of Gibsons world as social commentary of the Information Society we are in the progress of becomming. Remarkable. It is true that the characters in Neuromancer are rather cartoony, and two dimensional but I personally have the feeling that this may well for once have been intentional. Refreshingly, the environment is more alive, detailed and intelligent than the characters that inhabit it, which also explains how and why Neuromancer has managed to free itself from the constraints of conventional plotting. Funnily enough, Neuromancer might be the one novel I can think of that could very well live without its plot, and work purely on the basis of the brilliant environment it has created.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen It's not about computers; you just think it is., 8. Mai 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Neuromancer (Remembering Tomorrow) (Taschenbuch)
For the many who seem to think Neuromancer is about computers, it's not. Many of the novels critics have remarked that Neuromancer's main character, Case, is a programmer who never programs. This is false. Reread the novel. While preparing for the attack on the Sensenet ICE case spends several days programming. Still, the criticism is more the misinterpretation of youth than anything else. The novel was written during the early '80's and videogames were its inspiration. Unless you had access to a mainframe at this time, programming was something you did by poking cheap BASIC programs into APPLE II's or Timex/Sinclair80's. Videogames were the rage. The desktop revolution had yet to happen but everyone had an ATARI game machine. That's why most of Case's ICE breakers come in cartridges to be slotted. Videogames are learned not through programming but body language. Case is more like someone who's mastered all the secret moves of Mortal Kombat than a programmer. Anyway, AI's do most of programming in the novel -- true programming in Case's world is a Metafunction, beyond human. Like pinball, videogames are style over substance. As is Neuromancer. But, ah, what style! So, back to the main point. Computers are not the point of Neuromancer -- information is the point and the control of information is even more the point! And, so style may not be deep but it is information. Ask any LA gang member if style doesn't matter. Style can mean life or death. Style conveys information about who purveys it. And like all good fiction, Neuromancer was about the time it was written. Neuromancer is about the feel of the '80's. During the early '80's there was the feel of something ominous and wonderful just beginning to happen. And Neuromancer captures that feel -- the feel of the early days of the information revolution. It may seem like were really into the meat of it now but it really is still just the beginning. So, read the book, and like Molly says,"Never let the little pricks! generation gap you." We may all be sitting around these days wearing Carpal Tunnel wrist braces but more than ever you still can't let the information juggernaut steamroller you.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Prophecy a'plenty, 31. Januar 1998
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Neuromancer (Remembering Tomorrow) (Taschenbuch)
William Gibson seems to have channelled the future right back into the late 1980's, when he wrote this book. Knowing that the nerve splice is still nonexistant, but imminent, clues the knowledgeable reader to just how well Gibson interprets the world economy today, alongwith its inevitable affect on tomorrow. The world moves on, as another famous author reminds us, (SK) and it appears to me that Gibson has more of a handle on reality than many give him credit for.
The lost and somewhat illucid character of Case, alongwith the tussle-ready Molly, speak of a street sense learned the hard way. My favorite clip is where Molly slaps a captive who was causing trouble in his own weird way and tells him something like "...I can hurt you real bad, and not leave a mark on you...I LIKE to do that...". The book will grab and pull and color your emotions, making it a very quick and enjoyable read. Too quick, you ask me. I have reread it several times, and plan on doing so again. Palimpsest-like, the scenarios of the book truly reveal themselves through the minutiae of repitition. To me the book explains a lot, and says "Prepare...prepare for what we ourselves have wrought.
The worldwide AI race began around 1983, and was already fairly old news by time this book was written, but because of the scantiness of information on that subject, along with the myriad military applications inherent in AI, anyone must know that the reality far surpasses the false front of the technology brokers everywhere in the world. I was able to glean a little more about AI from this book, Though not as much as from "The God Project", and some others. The best is Feigenbaum and McCorducks "The Fifth Generation: Japans Computer Challenge to the world", 1983.
Gibson touches on the funny similarity between possible definitions of the term AI, and even goes so far as to stipulate it as "Alien Intelligence, as well as Artificial Intelligence.
The book is great, and will take you through a long flight or other trip with no problem at all. Definitely NOT a waste of time.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A classic, like 1984, Brave New World, & The Time Machine., 5. Dezember 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Neuromancer (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Few books have enjoyed a more enviable reputation than William Gibson's first novel, Neuromancer-possibly the ultimate cult novel. It's the only novel ever to win the science fiction triple crown: the Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick awards, science fiction's highest honors.
Early in the story Case, the hero, stares into a shop window at a display of shiriken, or ninja stars, deadly martial arts weapons that can be tossed like playing cards: "They caught the street's neon and twisted it, and it came to Case that these were the stars under which he voyaged, his destiny spelled out in a constellation of cheap chrome." Those words contain the essence of Gibson's writing style: in a single striking image, he transforms a flat metal object into a philosophical abstraction. Just as impressive is his phenomenal attention to detail. Gibson seems to know absolutely everything about metals, plastics, electronics, explosives, weapons, computers, physics, space travel, biosurgery, Japanese culture, spies, corporations, politics, governments, etc.
Yet, despite the astounding occurence of technological references that crowd every page of his novels, Gibson admits he fakes a lot of what he writes about technology. "This may be a suicidal admission, but most of the time I don't know what I'm talking about when it comes to the scientific or logical rationales that supposedly underpin my books."
Nevertheless, Gibson's technological landscapes are strangely compelling creations, as in this description from Neuromancer: "Cyberspace. A graphic representation of data abstracted from the banks of every computer in the human system. Unthinkable complexity. Lines of light arranged in the nonspace of the mind, clusters and constellations of data. Like city lights receding. . . ."
His best characters are three dimensional and, even more important, really interesting. Here's a description of the hero: "Case was twenty-four. At twenty-two, he'd been a cowboy, a rustler, one of the best in the Sprawl. He'd been trained by the best, by McCoy Pauley and Bobby Quine, legends in the biz. He'd operated on an almost permanent adrenaline high, a byproduct of youth and proficiency, jacked into a custom cyberspace deck that projected his disembodied consciousness into the consensual hallucination that was the matrix. A thief, he'd worked for other, wealthier thieves, employers who provided the exotic software required to penetrate the bright walls of corporate systems, opening windows into rich fields of data. He'd made the classic mistake, the one he'd sworn he'd never make. He stole from his employers. He kept something for himself and tried to move it through a fence in Amsterdam. He still wasn't sure how he'd been discovered, not that it mattered now."
From there, Gibson plunges the reader deeper into the gritty underworld of a future with seemingly no future-a civilization controlled by greedy corporate structures, devoid of natural beauty because the eco systems are all failing and ordinary animals, like horses, have become extinct to be replaced with virtual constructs of the horse. Gibson's future world is akin to Ridley Scott's vision of Los Angeles in the movie, Blade Runner. It seems likely that Scott's movie, which came out two years before the novel, had heavily influenced Gibson.
The characters in Neuromancer alter their appearance with surgery and implants and alter their consciousness with simstims, a kind of movie in which the viewer participates in the experience with all five senses, similar to the feelies in Huxley's Brave New World. The following is a typical example of a Gibson character who customizes his own nervous system: "Julius Deane was one hundred and thirty-five years old, his metabolism assiduously warped by a weekly fortune in serums and hormones. His primary hedge against aging was a yearly pilgrimage to Tokyo, where genetic surgeons re-set the code of his DNA, a procedure unavailable in Chiba. Then he'd fly to Hong Kong and order the year's suits and shirts. Sexless and inhumanly patient, his primary gratification seemed to lie in his devotion to esoteric forms of tailor-worship."
Gibson introduces some fascinating new technological cultural artifact on nearly every page. But he does it so smoothly that it never seems obtrusive. If people do things like wear computer jacks surgically implanted into their skulls so they can walk around in a virtual reality directly wired to their brains, it's always because it furthers the plot in some way. Case's girlfriend and sidekick, Molly, wears mirrored glasses permanently grafted into her skin, and she has razors hidden under her nails that slide out at will when she moves into combat.
For some reason, a mysterious personage has chosen Case to lead a corporate raid that twists and turns down a labyrinth-half virtual, half real-of cosmic significance. Even without the sci-fi plot, the novel works well as a mystery, an old fashioned adventure and love story, a road epic, a suspense thriller, and as a philosophical commentary on man's relationship to God. Case's adventures ultimately take him to Stray Light, a weird, almost medieval structure floating in space like a satellite around the planet where he comes face to face with an AI (artificial intelligence). In an earlier passage, Case is in a kind of space port where he first encounters the AI, Wintermute:
He fumbled through a pocketful of lirasi, slotting the small dull alloy coins one after another, vaguely amused by the anachronism of the process. The phone nearest him rang.
Automatically he picked it up.
"Yeah?"
Faint harmonics, tiny inaudible voices rattling across some orbital link, and then a sound like wind.
"Hello, Case."
A fifty-lirasi coin fell from his hand, bounced, and rolled out of sight across Hilton carpeting.
"Wintermute, Case. It's time to talk."
It was a chip voice.
"Don't you want to talk, Case?"
He hung up.
On his way back to the lobby he had to walk the length of the ranked phones. Each rang in turn, but only once, as he passed.
Gibson's one stylistic problem seems to be a certain vagueness that occasionally obscures the story. This defect is fairly common in science fiction writers for some reason, though his friend and collaborator, Bruce Sterling, never seems guilty of it. Taken individually, each sentence in Neuromancer is carefully sculpted and diamond clear, but taken together, they can occasionally add up to a lot of murk. The novel also leaves certain questions unanswered that may or may not come clear from repeated readings. For example, we never learn why Case was selected for the job when other, possibly better, "cowboys" could have been had for much cheaper. Gibson, like some European film makers, rarely crosses the i's and dots the t's.
So far, Neuromancer hasn't been made into a movie. From almost the first page, I realized that no living director could possibly do it justice like Ridley Scott, the world's greatest science fiction movie director. But Scott says he's tired of directing sci-fi movies and refuses to make them. I'd like to see him get interested in directing it before someone inferior botches the job. Does anyone out there know him personally?
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Beautiful work of Art., 27. November 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Neuromancer (Gebundene Ausgabe)
First, let's get the complaints of negative reviewers out of the way. This is not a book of "predictions," so throw away the whiny nagging about how things look now (the jury's still out, by the way, and I don't see "Neuromancer" being seriously contradicted), and whether a few self-appointed arbiters of plausibility give it their stamp of approval. They have no better idea than you or I or Gibson does of what info- and bio-tech will look like in a hundred years. I don't care if Gibson ever admitted that "he knows nothing about computers." If you were looking for a factual book on computer technology, you were in the wrong aisle. Go back to your "Windows 95 Secrets" or Visual Basic primers. [If you want a truly entertaining and well-written techie book, try "Programming Perl" by Larry Wall.] Poor characterization? Again, missing the point--the book is not meant as an exploration of personal development. The characters are types, ciphers that emerge from the setting, creatures of the world Gibson constructs. They are more mythic than human, iconic, and need to be approached as such. Yes, the book's themes and ideas have been foreshadowed, e.g., by Delany, Brunner, Burroughs (William), Fritz Lang, etc. So what? This in no way detracts from Gibson's unique synthesis, vision, and consistent allegorical impulse. And the book is rife with allegory. Gibson masterfully employs our post-modern technological experience to revive older concepts that science and technology had seemingly laid to rest: ghosts, souls, the afterlife, omniscience, demons, possession, zombies, werewolves, spells--and this is by no means exhaustive--without anymore hint of metaphysical mumbo-jumbo than a DVD player or a packet sniffer. He focuses on the fluidity of reality suffused with technology, the information-tech foundations of human perceptions, consciousness and physiognomy. And through his clear, evocative writing, always sketching that one perfect detail, he reminds that, as we read, we hold in our hands the original (and still ultimate) "virtual reality system." I believe that, at some level, much of the book is a comment on the reader-writer interaction: the reader "jacks in" to the author's world; the writer "transports" the reader by tapping directly into the reader's sensory memories. If Case is passive, then, we must admit, so are we. The myriad ingenious "predictions," as fascinating and debatable as they might be, are simply means to these ends. Let's face it, the only reason why some people feel the need to so vehemently dispute Gibson's vision is because it IS so captivating and seductive, and they think they need to set the record straight (about 22nd-century technology!).
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5.0 von 5 Sternen ...And Cyberspace was born., 8. Juni 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Neuromancer (Gebundene Ausgabe)
"The sky above the port was the color of television, tuned to a dead channel."

So begins William Gibson's prophetic and apocryphal novel NEUROMANCER, the first in his SPRAWL Trilogy and arguably the most important Science Fiction novel of the Century. In a single, mind-bending work, Gibson propelled an entire generation into a new era of information perception, an era that has since woven itself strand-by-strand into the global information nexus we call the World Wide Web.

It begins with Case, a young and bitter cyberspace cowboy prowling the neon-lit streets of Chiba City, in search of his lost identity. Robbed of his talent for working the Matrix as a data thief and cyberspace pirate, his life is a bleak and desolate journey towards self-destruction. Until the day a mirror-eyed assassin offers him a second chance.

Suddenly Case is an unwitting pawn in a game whose board stretches from Chiba to the Sprawl to an orbiting pleasure colony populated by Ninja clones and Zion-worshipping Rastafarian spacers. The job: to hack the unhackable. To break the ICE around an Artificial Intelligence and release it from its own hardwired mind. But at every turn Case is haunted by the shadows of his own dark past, and pursued by a faceless enemy whose very presence can kill.

Ironically, William Gibson tapped out the wonders of NEUROMANCER on a manual typewriter, and was certain it was fated for the Out Of Print stack or a quiet cult following. But now, over ten years later and still in print, it has become a kind of cultural landmark in a sea of Information; a chrome-and-silicon avatar of everything from the World Wide Web to Virtual Reality. NEUROMANCER must not be explained or related; it must be experienced, taken in through the pores and rolled against the tongue like electric adrenaline. And there is only one way to do so.

Pick up a copy. And jack in.

Clay Douglas Major
[...]
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