Kundenrezensionen


120 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (90)
4 Sterne:
 (15)
3 Sterne:
 (7)
2 Sterne:
 (6)
1 Sterne:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen FOR ADULTS, A SPIRITUAL SEEKER'S SURVIVAL GUIDE
Reviewer: Cory Giacobbe
As vortexes of parents and children whirl through the latest Harry Potter book, I wanted to honor a less-publicized gem. Mr. O'Dell's classic work seems to have attracted a quiet pool of devoted readership, including adults.
Unless grammar school students are worked with closely, this true story's beauty will evade most of them. This is...
Am 15. Juli 2000 veröffentlicht

versus
3.0 von 5 Sternen okay
I must admit that this book is quite dull in my point of view. The story is very interesting but the way Scott O'dell wrote it really did disappoint me. I wouldn't recommend you to buy it, but it is a good read.
Am 20. Oktober 1999 veröffentlicht


‹ Zurück | 1 212 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen FOR ADULTS, A SPIRITUAL SEEKER'S SURVIVAL GUIDE, 15. Juli 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Reviewer: Cory Giacobbe
As vortexes of parents and children whirl through the latest Harry Potter book, I wanted to honor a less-publicized gem. Mr. O'Dell's classic work seems to have attracted a quiet pool of devoted readership, including adults.
Unless grammar school students are worked with closely, this true story's beauty will evade most of them. This is due to the deceptive simplicity of style. Mr. O'Dell has an amazing gift for sophisticated subtext.
In some prior reviews, children call the book "dull." They rebel against, what they see as, ridiculously inane actions by the main character: spearing dinner, going for a swim, etc. They see her offering little emotion, plot.
In reality, what a powerful world Scott O'Dell is evoking!
The main character spends much time, traumatized. Mr. O'Dell uses common activity, to mask overwhelming emotions the young girl has trouble confronting -- initially she runs away from each problem, by fastening to familiar actions that first comfort her. Gradually, they provoke her into creative-thinking, evolving the storyline.
The gist: For eighteen years (1835 - 1853) from age twelve to thirty, Karana (public name, Won-a-pa-lei) the main character, must fend for herself on an abandoned island.
I was never aware of Mr. O'Dell's books, when I was a pre-adolescent girl. I love the subtle craftwork: the author's masterful use of the passive voice, as counterbalance to each trauma it is veiling; his weather-descriptions tracking many characters' inner turmoil or serenity; the minimal use of thought-processes, his letting each character's -- even the wild dogs' -- physical action reveal intense emotion.
It requires time to absorb content.
For example, the author delicately lets drop one same phrase, throughout various scenes. The girl keeps returning to the thought, that she is able to scare away some dogs, "but not the leader ...." She even accomplishes killing a few dogs, "but not the leader ...." Those repetitive, hypnotic words become her meditative koan, an obsession, initially concealing her vengeful, murderous state of mind, her goal of attack. This mindset is at odds with the quiet, constructive work of building a home, appreciating nature, in which she is otherwise engaged.
Because feelings are understated, one rare, overtly dramatic moment is unexpected and memorable --
I first came upon the book a few months after my dog of over 20 (human) years had died. The story was cathartic. Even years later, Chapter 25 moves me. Karana's love for her dog resonates. There's that one outpouring of anguish, the most explicitly emotional, explosive line in the whole book, "Rontu ... oh, Rontu!" It still puts a lump in my throat.
Even more than its indirect, magnificent plea for respect to all creatures, the text explores this ironic theme, the gift of loss. Karana must confront her anger at not just the choices by others, but her own, impactng her life.
One must read between the quiet lines to see that her father is a mirror-image of the gruff, selfish Russian captain, his interloping foe. Preoccupied villagers, their successive leaders, lack empathy and foresight. They dismiss the sufferings of wounded otters; of neglected pet dogs forced to turn wild; of a distressed sibling of Karana, where they even try to prevent her from helping.
Thus, no nurturing models exist for Karana, motherless even as the book opens. The village women, including her sister, act venomously. In battle, rocks are flung "from many places along the cliffs." It's a subtle hint. Earlier the author has already revealed, these are the hiding-places of the women. This passive-assertive aggression Karana must learn to purify, re-direct towards higher purposes, afterwards.
In examining her heritage, and the culture of strangers, she realizes she must carve her own way. She reminds me very much of long-time seekers. Many of us grasped with mingled fear and sadness, even anger, then with freeing awareness, that our legacies, Eastern or Western, including modern New Thought, may exhibit rigidity.
From two centuries past, here is Karana, reminding us that this fresh minted millennium is calling for resilience and courage.
From her to us is the gift of the secret name.
The author lets her blurt, to us, her own hidden name, Karana. She is bonded to us; she is our mirror. Her challenges, our (inner) ones.
The author also implies that, only when Karana drops pride, is the girl able to sense that the secret name for loss is: blessing-in-disguise. She is proud that she is not so vain as her sister. Yet she herself, after diving from the ship, lets her basket of precious ornaments and tools, her prized, fancy yucca skirt, drag her down, almost drowning her, until she realizes only if she lets go, will she rise.
Even the island has a secret name.
It has been known to the world by Spanish explorers since 1602 as Isla de San Nicholas. Karana cherishes its private label, Island of the Blue Dolphins. The name gives her hope, strength, for she considers dolphins her friends.
How ironic. An island, that reportedly became a secretly titled naval base, for defensive military maneuvers/experiments, once was graced by the presence of Karana. She had set aside her own defenses, and experienced oneness with her world. Her story reflects the very code of Franciscan harmlessness, integral to the path of the friar, she later meets.
Mr. O'Dell never explains what the personal name, "Karana," might be. For me, the book illumines that there is a secret name for each of us: one dominant, beautiful quality of soul radiating, that defines who you are. In some way, Karana's secret name must surely mean "compassion."
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Reflections of My Daughter's Required Reading, 31. Juli 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Island of the Blue Dolphins (Hörkassette)
My 9-year old daughter was assigned Island of the Blue Dolphins as required summer reading -- her 4th grade class will be studying California history once school starts. My husband and I decided to also read the book for the first time as part of our family reading.
Orr daughter enjoyed the book - especially the parts about Karana making friends with the animals and many of the survival descriptions. The book offers tantalizing possiblities for a 9-year old. My husband thought it was a great adventure book, and he liked the idea that the protagonist was a girl this time. I, too, thought it was inspiring that the main character was a brave young female who was able to wrestle the natural environment and yet be respectful of its wonders.
I, do, however, have three concerns, perhaps petty and irrelavant given the larger vision of the story: (1) Nowhere in the book was there a mention of how Karana made her many fires -- she used fire to rid the houses at her aband! oned village; she made numerous fires for cooking and keeping warm. I remember only one description that hinted at the difficulty of making fire -- when she sprinkled ashes over her night fire and blew the embers in the morning to keep it alive. (I hope I got the description right.) Fire is basic to sustaining long-term survival for humans. I think a young reader would have apreciated at least a brief description. (2) Given that the book was first published around 1960 or so and written by a man, I can understand why there were no mention of matters related to all girls as they mature from a 12-year old to a woman. Much of the description of survival was gender-neutral, as it should be, but I would have preferred a bit more description of Karana's self-discovery as a female. (3) I'm a bit bothered that many of the great books about girls have the protagonist as conveniently orphaned in order to allow her to make defining moment decisions unfettered by parental, especial! ly, maternal, constraints. While this book falls in that ve! in, Island is however based on a true story, one in which the real Karana had to rely on her wits to survive and make sense of the world.
My concerns do not diminish the power of the book and I only wish the book had not eluded me when I was my daughter's age. Our family discussions these past few days have included references to the book. In fact, I just bought the sequel, Zia, for my daughter, and will probably borrow it when she is done with it.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen One of my favorite novels, and a classic, 19. Juli 2000
Von 
Robert James (Culver City, CA USA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Island of the Blue Dolphins (Taschenbuch)
I first read "Island of the Blue Dolphins" in fifth grade, way back in the early seventies. I remembered it twenty years later, when I read it again as an adult looking to build a library for his daughter. Scott O'Dell's tale of Karana is still as perfect now as it was decades ago; none of the adventure has faded. I had nightmares as a child of the giant fish she battles; I still read it with excitement today. One of the great classics of survival!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4.0 von 5 Sternen Island of the the Blue Dolphins, 2. Juli 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Island of the Blue Dolphins (Taschenbuch)
In the "The Island of the Blue Dolphins" I was amazed how she survived on the island by herself and how brave she was. I also liked Ronto beacuse I love dogs and Ronto is a dog I would like to have.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen An Amazing Book For Everyone, 18. Mai 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Island of the Blue Dolphins (Taschenbuch)
Island of the Blue Dolphins is a really good book about a girl who has to survive on an island by herself. In order to survive she has to make weapons, find food, and make shelter. She also has to try to kill her only enemy on the island, the wild dogs. I think this book really shows you what it is like to be stranded and never know when help's going to come. It's not hard to read and I think anyone would enjoy it.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Inspires the Imagination!, 4. Mai 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Island of the Blue Dolphins (Taschenbuch)
I read this book for the first time in sixth grade. I love it. I'm dissapointed to see that the reading level is 9-12 years. Although the book isn't too advanced, I think any age group would enjoy it. You really can't put it down. You will find yourself blowing off important things in your every day life just to read a few more pages.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Outstanding! Moving! Stunning!, 3. Mai 2000
Von Ein Kunde
This tale of courage and survival is a story that stays with the reader long after the book is finished. Karana, twelve year old Indian girl, is inadvertently left behind on the island home she has known all her life.
One might think that being an Indian girl that she would have acquired all the skills she needs to survive. However, in a society with rules that carefully and extensively governs what a girl can learn, she is left with very few survival skills. Scott O'dell skillfully demonstrates how Karana carefully thinks through the observations she made of the men in her village, and then teaches herself through trial and error, to master these essential survival skills.
Scott O'Dell was a master story teller, and this book is my favorite. Karana's lonely story will both reward and haunt you.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Island of the Blue Dolphins was a Super book!, 18. April 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Island of the Blue Dolphins (Taschenbuch)
This book was about a girl who was left alone on a island formany years. She went through many adventures and hardships. In thebeginning she had to find a place to build a new home. She build it next to a tall wall made of rock. Around the front she built a fence made out of whale bones to keep the wild dogs out. My favorite part of the book is when she shoots the leader of the wild dogs and feels sorry for him. She takes him home and nurses him back to health. At first he doesn't like her and isn't nice to her. After a while they become the closest friends. She names him Rontu. Rontu protects her from the other wild dogs and alerts her to any dangers. After many years Rontu grows old and goes off and dies. The girl is very lonely without Rontu around so she watches the wild dogs and finds one that looks like Rontu. She captures him and they quickly become friends. She also makes friends with many of the other animals on the island. She has birds that she captured, a fox, and some otters. In the end she is rescued after spending so much time on the island alone. All her people had been drowned on a boat. She had no one left and no one could understand her language. I thought that this was a great story because it showed that even when you are alone you can find things to keep you happy. I also liked this story because I live alone with my dog. My dog keeps me company just like Rontu did for the girl.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Island of the Blue Dolphins was a Super book!, 18. April 2000
Von 
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Island of the Blue Dolphins (Taschenbuch)
This book was about a girl who was left alone on a island for many years. She went through many adventures and hardships. In the beginning she had to find a place to build a new home. She build it next to a tall wall made of rock. Around the front she built a fence made out of whale bones to keep the wild dogs out. My favorite part of the book is when she shoots the leader of the wild dogs and feels sorry for him. She takes him home and nurses him back to health. At first he doesn't like her and isn't nice to her. After a while they become the closest friends. She names him Rontu. Rontu protects her from the other wild dogs and alerts her to any dangers. After many years Rontu grows old and goes off and dies. The girl is very lonely without Rontu around so she watches the wild dogs and finds one that looks like Rontu. She captures him and they quickly become friends. She also makes friends with many of the other animals on the island. She has birds that she captured, a fox, and some otters. In the end she is rescued after spending so much time on the island alone. All her people had been drowned on a boat. She had no one left and no one could understand her language. I thought that this was a great story because it showed that even when you are alone you can find things to keep you happy. I also liked this story because I live alone with my dog. My dog keeps me company just like Rontu did for the girl.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen "An Inspiring Tale", 16. April 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Island of the Blue Dolphins (Taschenbuch)
This is a wonderful book about a young girl who goes through strugles,but she gets through all of it with more courage than most of the people I've ever met. This book should be number 1 of the past 200 years. This book deseveres every nomanation it gets.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 212 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

Island of the Blue Dolphins
Island of the Blue Dolphins von Scott O'Dell (Taschenbuch - 1. Februar 1987)
Gebraucht & neu ab: EUR 0,01
Auf meinen Wunschzettel Zahlungsmöglichkeiten ansehen
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen