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10 von 10 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Morrie tells his story & everyone listens
Morrie wanted to share his upbeat philosophy of life and how that should carry over in his death. If he were alive today, he clearly would be staggered by the number of people who took the time to listen.
I bought this book two years ago based on great reviews but couldn't get excited about reading a book about death. I even skipped the movie. But after finally...
Veröffentlicht am 1. August 2000 von R. Spell

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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Platitudes from Morrie
Tuesdays with Morrie is the tale of a "dying man talking to a living man, telling him what he should know." It's a compendium of one man's life's lessons, dispensed by the sainted Morrie in his effort to "walk that final bridge between life and death and narrate the trip."
My question is this--is Morrie's advice of any real value? Are his...
Veröffentlicht am 19. Mai 2000 von Ciáres


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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A "Must Read" for anyone over 50 on how to live and die!, 13. März 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Morrie has touched a universal chord when he reconnects wtih a former student who visits him on Tuesdays during the waning months of his life. Providentially, Mitch Albom, a sports column writer for Detroit and author of several sports related books, sees his favorite teacher on "Nightline" discussing his battle with a terminal illness. Although Mitch gave him a briefcase on graduation day and promised to keep in touch, he never did ....until "Nightline." The rest is history. A lesson to be learned: Tell teachers, parents, spiritual mentors, children, and significant others before they are at "death's door" how much you love them, that they made a difference in your life. and most importantly, spend time with them in their dying days. It may not always be pretty to watch, but you will learn lessons about living, loving, family, forgiveness and dying.
Connie De Vries: Grand Rapids, Michigan
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The best book I have ever read., 23. Dezember 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Lou Gehrig's Disease, also known as ALS has only been the name of a disease that a famous baseball player died of. Until recently..A dear friend's father passed away...and now my dad's brother has been diagnosed with this insidious disease. Mitch Albom struck a chord deep within my soul. Morrie struck an even deeper chord. Life is so full of so many things..things..things. People have become numb to other people because of so many things..things..things. Mitch Albom was blessed by the friendship and love Morrie showed him as he faced his mortality. I have been blessed by reading this "course" in life. Life is only worth living if you have loved ones to share it with. Tuesdays with Morrie teaches us to look at our own lives..our loved ones' lives and set up boundaries so that we can live life to the fullest right to time we face Our Maker. Thank you, Mitch. Thank you, Morrie.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen A really nice book full of wisdom, 1. Juni 2004
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tuesdays with Morrie (Taschenbuch)
When I bought this book and read it immediately, I was deeply moved by this story. This book contains a lot of wisdom you should think about it... most important is: "live your life NOW and INTENSIVE". I've heard it a lot of times, but since I read this book I then began to understand. It is still a process and I have to work on it but... I am now a step closer to it, to live my life more intensive.
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1.0 von 5 Sternen An insult to the man, 11. Juni 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Morrie was obviously an amazing, caring, wise person. He got that way by living a life of service to humankind, by focusing on more important things than money. So along comes this journalist who jots down a few quotes, and people flock to it saying how much they learned. This totally misses the point. Morrie's life demonstrates that there are no shortcuts to the lessons he's learned, but in our quick-shot read-a-book-and-now-I-know-everything society, people think they "get it." Morrie specifically says that he hates self help books, and yet now his life and death have been turned into one. How sad.
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1.0 von 5 Sternen Self-absorbed author writes of self-absorbed man, 28. Januar 1999
This book is a quick read, which makes it less painful to get through.
Granted, the auther does acknowledge that he was too self-absorbed when he started this book, but by the end of the book, I'm not left with any indication that anything had changed.
The main problem with this book is that I could not connect with any of the characters: The neurotic old man who desires to die and the self-absorbed ex-student who comes to visit him.
The old man, Morrie, was a nice guy who was a teacher for many years. He constantly needed to be acknowledged and be at the center of attention when he contacts a fatal disease. This book is about Morrie telling the young man about what it means to live.
Unfortunately, it comes across far too preachy. (too many "should" and "shouldn't" in life statements), but written in such a cliche fasion that one feels attached by old gum-drops: sweet, sticky, and the need to brush them away.
In the story we have Morrie (the old man) putting together a going-to-die party for himself and invites people to come and tell him how much they admire him. Morrie tells the author about how he would go to the disco and bring records that no one else would listen to and dance by himself in front of everyone for attention. Another story we have of Morrie is sitting at a basketball game, where people are cheering and chanting for the team and he yells out something that causes them to stop, star at him, and he sits and grins about being at the center of attention once more. After a few of these stories, I felt like yelling "Okay, he's got an inferiority complex! I've got it already! Can we move on!"
We get such odd statements as "One must learn how to die in order to live". Excuse me?!? The logic was oddly reversed. If these were supposed to be wise statements to lives one's live by, I'll take a pass, thank you.
A Jewish book club was touting this book as a story of a Jew. Please be forwarned that while Morrie was Jewish by birth, he gave up Judiasm as a child and was more interested in other religions and quoted them often. He even makes it a point to embarass his brother's Rabbi near the end and smiles about being at the center of attention once more. There is nothing Jewish about this book.
It's a time-waster. It's a fairly thin book with a lot of empty space. If normal sized type, leading, and a simple design were used, this book would be half this size. But then, it really had little content worth reading.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A truly remarkable and heart-warming novel, 18. Dezember 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Tuesdays With Morrie is a truly remarkable book which reveals the story behind a great man's life beginning with the present and touching upon different pieces of Morrie's life along the way. The book deals with such aspects of Morrie's life as his love-deprived childhood, his achievements in the classroom and finally his last hours as he lies dying from a terminal illness (Lou Gehrig's Disease.) The book also reveals the basis behind Morrie's greatness as a teacher as well as his greatness as an everyday person. This book gives people a way to see how life can be lived without putting such a large importance on material things. It shows that the people who make the most difference in the world are those who use their heart, not their wallet. To me, the message of this book is clear: to show people life's true meaning and purpose. Mitch Albom tells much of Morrie's story through his eyes and shows readers what Morrie did in order to leave his mark on Earth before he died. Albom tells, very effectively, all that Morrie did for people up unto the moment he died. I get the feeling that Mitch hopes to inspire people with his words, and with Morrie's thoughts. The most unique writing technique the author uses is the way he portrays dialogue. In order to stress the importance of Morrie's words, his are the only ones which are placed in quotation marks. All other dialogue is written in plain text. This is very effective because it shows the reader how much Morrie's words are valued. Another aspect of Albom's writing is how the book's point of view. Although he is the naarator for the entire book, you still get a very good idea of how Morrie thinks and feels. Albom is able to do this through his experience as a sports reporter. He includes a technique which helps him to grasp someone else's thoughts in his writing very well. Overall, I believe that this book is very well written and seems as though it took the author a very long time to write, although it is not a long book. This is the kind of book that is revised and revised and revised until it is perfect. I believe that it is. Albom developes the most important of all lessons in only 200 pages. Not any author could have pulled this book off. By writing this book, Albom has shown the world that just because he is a sports writer doesn't mean he is not creative. I wonder why he became a sports writer and not solely a literature author instead.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen More incredible than fiction..., 3. Dezember 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Tuesdays with Morrie is a story more incredible than fiction. It is a tale of the human experience. It is about life, death, family, and most importantly, it is about loving life.
If one listens to Mitch Albom's radio show or read his weekly column, they may find him light-hearted, joking, and perhaps a bit corny. However, he shows an entirely different person in this book. He shows the emotional human being behind the microphone and the sports page. He talks about some of the sensitive parts in his life, including his brother Peter.
As for Morrie Schwartz, he was probably one of the wisest men of his time. He erased from his mind the fear which holds back every human being: the fear of death. Because he has done so, the last years of his life become his most enlightening. They become so not only for Morrie, but also for Mitch as well as they share experiences between the student and the teacher.
The people in Tuesdays with Morrie are incredibly human, even for a non-fiction book. Mitch Albom bared his heart on this peace for which he has been commended by being on the New York Times best-seller list for over forty weeks.
Morrie Schwartz seems like the wise old grandfather I never had. Some of his words I will never forget, even years down the road. His advice has already helped me through the tougher days in my life. His best advice is "Mitch, I don't allow myself any more than that. A little each morning, a few tears, and that's all." Keep in mind that this man is dying and will not allow himself to feel sorry.
This book is so real that even Ted Koppel seems human, which rarely happens in real life! He does three interviews with Morrie during his battle with ALS, and Morrie asks more questions than Mr. Koppel.
There are many books which compare to Tuesdays with Morrie. One for instance is The Giver by Lois Lowry. However, Lowry's tale cannot compare with Tuesdays with Morrie because it is aimed at a young audience and is complete fiction. Its fantasy plot line cannot compare to real life. The only book which displays an example of loving life in greater proportion is Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand. However, this book is strongly based in the philosophy of Objectivism, and is not for the masses.
All in all, this is one of the best books I've read, under only A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving and a few books by the aforementioned Ayn Rand. I would recommend this book to anyone who has had a teacher change their lives.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Very Bittersweet, & An Incredible Story., 12. Juni 1998
Von Ein Kunde
I read this book at the insistence of a friend who suffers from depression. This friend said she'd made her life so much better just by reading this book. I must admit, I too was suffering from depression after the death of my mother. So I read this book, approaching it with a lot of cynicism. Well, all I can say is that it made this hard-hearted young man cry a lot, because it reminded me of the time my father was dying of a brain tumor in the hospital. My dad had tried to teach me so much, yet I turned away from him so often. However, when he first went in the hospital after his diagnosis was when he and I had our greatest talks together...and when I got to show him that I truly loved him by getting the best grades of my life. Eventually my dad ended up having the same needs as Morrie did (help with eating, using the "commode", etc.), and I winced when I saw that my dad could no longer perform simple functions as he once had. Keep in mind this was a man who could outrun his 13 year-old son at 65!!!! Anyway, I have always regretted not learning as much from my dad, and my best teachers, as I could have. I vowed, after reading this book, to learn at every chance possible, and to always live my life the way that is best for me, and NOT the way others tell me to, with regards to careers and so forth. This book is more than a great read or a tear jerker; it is therapy for those who have gotten stuck in the "rut" that controls their lives. It does not offer the keys to Heaven, of course, but it helps you find the way to a more contented way of looking at life's journey.Really, read this book. You will be glad you did. If you do not believe me, just ask Ted Koppel.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Philosopher Fails to Reconcile Ideal with Real, 15. Juli 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Of course, we should all give 5 stars, in this case, so as not to speak ill of the dead. It was that type of book. The author did a fine job, and I enjoyed much of the book on a PURELY emotional level. But that is the level at which Morrie's life seemed to be stuck. Yet he pontificates the lessons of life and death, HUMBLY for our absorption. I'm sure Morrie was a lovely person to be around. But his quoted allusion by someone of him being a "prophet" is a bit much for my tastes. He opted to avoid the real world because his ideology, apparently, saw honest work as EXPLOITATION. So he became a loveable "clown" in the ivory tower on Brandeis' campus. He apparently had a common utopian dream that afflicts many campus residents, but he never had to reconcile his own life with many of the rigors of the "real" world. His life is brought down to the basics of traditional emotions, in a life dominated by emotionalism. He seemed very determined to "win over" everyone to loving him. He struck me in the portrayal as entirely too needy, emotionally. The great lessons seemed disappointing and trite, not profound. It left me wondering like in the song, "Is that all there is?" Technically, and classically, Morrie was no philosopher, but the sociologist he maybe always was. I'm sure he would be a fine companion, ever trying to please and win one over to his way of feeling. But profundity of thought about death, I did not see in this thesis! IT would earn only a C, and not the easy A's that Morrie gave out of compassion and social engineering. That's what makes horse racing and the economy worth it's salt.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Tuesdays with Morrie: A Subjective Review, 6. Dezember 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Tuesdays with Morrie is a book that should rock our society's 30-ish to 40 -ish members in a way that will not be soon forgotten. Perhaps we should all get out of our BMW's as we're racing toward the next "prize", and stop to read this profoundly moving story of an older man sharing his views on living and dying with Mitch Albom,his former student and professional sports writer. There are lessons in simple phrases or looks in this novel that will make even someone who "isn't smelling the coffee", pause and reflect on what is really important as we move through this thing called life.
Morrie has captured many of the reasons why people in this country are never satisfied. As he puts it, " There's a big confusion in this country over what we want versus wnat we need....You need food, you WANT a chocolate sundae. You have to be honest with yourself. You don't NEED the latest sports car, you don't need the biggest house". Morrie's wisdom and revelations about living and dying continue through this slim novel,enhanced by the powerful writing style of Mitch Albom.
As I wept my way through this book, there was one inconsistency that was surprising and bothersome, considering the sensitivity of Mr. Albom's penning of this novel. The female characters in the book were one-dimensional and impossible to get to know. Even Connie, Morrie's wife,never developed as a character, despite Morrie's discussion of the lovely benefits of marriage. Even more surprising was the fact that Mr. Albom couldn't or wouldn't develop the essence of his own wife. It was a sad lack in an otherwise powerful and tender novel.
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Tuesdays with Morrie
Tuesdays with Morrie von Mitch Albom (Taschenbuch - 29. Dezember 1998)
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