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10 von 10 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Morrie tells his story & everyone listens
Morrie wanted to share his upbeat philosophy of life and how that should carry over in his death. If he were alive today, he clearly would be staggered by the number of people who took the time to listen.
I bought this book two years ago based on great reviews but couldn't get excited about reading a book about death. I even skipped the movie. But after finally...
Veröffentlicht am 1. August 2000 von R. Spell

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1.0 von 5 Sternen Platitudes from Morrie
Tuesdays with Morrie is the tale of a "dying man talking to a living man, telling him what he should know." It's a compendium of one man's life's lessons, dispensed by the sainted Morrie in his effort to "walk that final bridge between life and death and narrate the trip."
My question is this--is Morrie's advice of any real value? Are his...
Veröffentlicht am 19. Mai 2000 von Ciáres


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5.0 von 5 Sternen one to continue re-reading, 30. Juli 2000
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J. Evans (Worcester, MA United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
This is the kind of book that one must revisit at least once a year. The first time I read it, I closed the book with a feeling of awe and enlightenment at the final revelations and lectures of Morrie. Mitch Albom's historical record of an amazing teacher's final months and final struggle with a dibilatating disease showed sensitivity and bravery rarely found in fiction or non-fiction alike. But, in order for the lessons of the book to truly work their wonders, I believe I will reread this book every couple months, just to remind myself how special life really is.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen It's OK to Feel, 14. April 2000
Von 
This is a great book for anyone, but I found it especially appealing for me as a man. Society dictates and brainwashes men to believe that feelings are "weak"; particularly sadness or grief. To be a "strong" man, you can't ever cry or shed a single tear...so society would have us men believe.
The fact of the matter is, though, that society is dead wrong. It's the *weak* man that never cries and the strong man who is fully in touch with his emotions - and fully able to express them.
And that's what this book deals with...the necessity for expression of feelings in order to fully experience life. Don't be misled by the book's size. It may be short, but that's part of the book's beauty. I was amazed at the simplicity of this book - bite-sized chapters make for a very easy read, but each one is full of important life lessons.
Morrie, the book's subject and a retired college professor, speaks frankly and tenderly to Mitch, an ex-student of his. And over the course of Morrie's last 14 weeks on Earth, he brings Mitch back from the frantic, frenzied mindset of today's materialistic society. He teaches Mitch to feel again...that it's OK to be mad, it's OK to be sad, it's OK to cry.
Morrie was a profoundly loving man who faced his certain death with a triumphant optimism. He loved fully, and thank God he left us with this book of wisdom. Mitch Alborn has truly painted an amazing portrait of courage, hope, and inspiration.
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1.0 von 5 Sternen I was very disappointed, 4. Februar 2000
I bought this book with great expectations- I knew it was about a man at the end of his life, but I expected a deep look into his way of thinking, into his philosophy..instead, what I found was a mere outline of a wonderful person (Morrie Schwartz)...and lots of details about the author himself, that I'm sorry to say I didn't care about at all. All this running around & working non stop for money, that Mitch Albom talks about as if it's the only way somebody could live..I just disagree. Not everyone is like that, not everyone has to talk to his old teacher to get the idea that you have to really listen to & love the people around you. For some reason, Mitch Albom found this to be a very new & strange way of thinking, but in my opinion, it is the first & most important thing somebody should learn in order to live a full life, & to give to people around him. I don't know how I managed to finish this book- I found myself constantly annoyed by the author & his disbelief in everything that Morrie did or said- the fact that he didn't feel sorry for himself, the fact that he didn't realise he was at a dead end. Of course Morrie was in pain, of course he knew it was all over. But the fact that he had lived life to the fullest made him strong enough to accept death. I have no idea why this was so hard for Albom to understand. So the one thing that stays with me after closing the book is Morrie himself, his great courage & his honest & clear way of looking at life & death.
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1.0 von 5 Sternen Death lite, 1. Februar 2000
A sugar-coated pill, easy for those aging baby boomers to swallow. No doubt he was a sweet man, but I didn't learn one thing from Morrie (as represented) that I hadn't heard from many other sources. How many people will make real changes to their lives based on Morrie's lessons? Did Mitch Ablom? I doubt it.
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1.0 von 5 Sternen I am appalled at this book's success, 29. Dezember 1999
(I gave this book 1 star because there was no option to give a negative star) I chose "Tuesdays with Morrie" as my selection for a book club in which I am a member. Call me cynical, but I was actually as embarrassed- as if I had forced the others to read a Harlequin Romance novel, or some other book reeking with contrived sentimentality.
In the spirit of Asian philosophy, this book seeks to impart profound wisdom to the reader through a short, simple story. In my opinion, however, the author fails to even penetrate even the most superficial layers of our fast-paced capilatlist, commercial, consumer society with his trite observations. I mean, how seriously can anyone take a man who includes on his list of topics to discuss with his mentor, "death" and "life" and "love?" The result is not a deep revelation, but immature generalizations.
This tepid attempt at transcendence lacks even the most basic insight, and I am disturbed that it has remained on the best seller's list for so long.
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1.0 von 5 Sternen Foisting this book on others must stop, 24. Dezember 1999
Von 
Are you among the (too) many who were handed this book by a well-meaning soul promising it would change your life only to discover Tuesdays with Morrie is by turns maudlin, treacly and trite? While it is impossible to dislike Professor Schwartz, and hope against hope that he will beat his cruel disease, it is also impossible to escape Mitch Albom, who is so sophmorically self-absorbed that he annoyingly assumes his shortcomings must also be our own. For those of us who actually spent our growing-up years growing up, I have a small insight for the author: Professor Schwartz's aphorisms sum up the kind of love, compassion, empathy and fair play most of us learn as children, not as gifted undergraduates in a Brandeis lecture hall. Readers who find Morrie's observations startling, stimulating or novel may, like Albom, merely have some growing up to do. May they do so and find joy, but I respectfully suggest they keep their therapy (and this book) to themselves.
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1.0 von 5 Sternen Morrie is lovely, Mitch is treacly, 16. Juli 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Mitch Albom is a successful (as we're often reminded) sports writer who sees his old prof on TV and jumps on a plane to make a buck off him.
No, it's not exactly so bad, but it comes close. Morrie Schwartz was unquestionably an inspirational force in the world and owner of a good sense of humor. Unfortunately, the heavy hand of Mitch made the book nearly unbearable. His memories of Morrie as a teacher always seem less about his mentor and more about young Mitch: how much promise he showed, how much Morrie liked him, how impressed his parents were, and on. Though full of self reproach for his consumerism-driven jet-setting ways after college, Mitch never seems sincere. As he chronicles Morrie's last weeks on earth he focuses more on his own metamorphis, his new view of life through Morrie's impending death -- and not without a bit of self-congratulation.
Through this sticky Mitch film Morrie shines through, but it's hardly worth it. Order the Nightline specials, or read Morrie's own book.
This book might as easily have been called "The Personal Epiphanies of Mitch Albom, Sucessful Sportswriter."
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2.0 von 5 Sternen Repackaged platitudes, 29. Juni 1999
This book is unremarkable. ALS is clearly a terrible disease and Morrie clearly has some strength of character. However, the book's main messages -- enjoy the simple things in life, love one another, maintain a positive outlook, slow down, turn off your cell phone -- are poorly-communicated banalities. The book lacks depth and is written in a style that manipulates the reader's emotions rather than enabling a spontaneous reaction. Remove this book's disingenuous wrappings and you are left with a trimmed-down "Life's Little Instruction Book." Plus, I question some of Morrie's behavior. Close friends choosing to honor me with eulogies while I am still alive would be wonderful -- initiating such a 'living funeral' for myself would be a bit odd ("Come tell me how great I am before I die.") A favorite student choosing to write a book about my life would be wonderful -- planting the idea in his head and helping him outline the book would be a bit odd. And what about the author? Was Albom truly changed by his conversations with Morrie or has he gone back to his workaholic way of life? I suspect the latter since the author only spent his Tuesdays with Morrie since he was on strike and couldn't go to work. Finally, how did Morrie's wife Charlotte feel about all this? Would she say that -- by creating a media circus with Ted Koppel and camera crews filling the house -- Morrie lived up to his own aphorisms and made it clear how much he loved his family before he died?
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1.0 von 5 Sternen Self-serving Reporting, 20. Juni 1999
Von Ein Kunde
I had heard wonderful reviews of this book and how the author had done such a wonderful job with the subject of death and dying. I have no doubt that Morrie was a brilliant man and wonderful teacher. I suppose as with everything in life, we appreciate what we have too late. It struck me that this was the case with Mr. Albom. Funny, if Morrie was his favorite teacher and someone whom he treasured, why did the man have to be dying for Mr. Albom to be in communication with him once again??? Could it be for the right to share the dying experience and be enlightened, or could it be due to the fact that Mr. Albom was not working at that time and writing about Morrie was a convenient money-making option. I, too, have had a friend die of ALS, but never in my wildest dreams would I have commercialized his death for my own personal notoriety and gain. I also have a favorite teacher from my youth and am still a student learning from him, 30 years after the classroom. I didn't wait until he was in tragic circumstances to resume contact and I have made it a point to let him know during every visit that he made a great influence on my life and still inspires me to do my best. I only wish Mr. Albom had had the guts to let his professor die in peace and dignity. And, it appears that the things Morrie abhorred about our life in the nineties were the very things that nurtured the author. Sad testament to our society.
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1.0 von 5 Sternen An insult to the man, 11. Juni 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Morrie was obviously an amazing, caring, wise person. He got that way by living a life of service to humankind, by focusing on more important things than money. So along comes this journalist who jots down a few quotes, and people flock to it saying how much they learned. This totally misses the point. Morrie's life demonstrates that there are no shortcuts to the lessons he's learned, but in our quick-shot read-a-book-and-now-I-know-everything society, people think they "get it." Morrie specifically says that he hates self help books, and yet now his life and death have been turned into one. How sad.
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Tuesdays with Morrie
Tuesdays with Morrie von Mitch Albom (Taschenbuch - 29. Dezember 1998)
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