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10 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Morrie tells his story & everyone listens
Morrie wanted to share his upbeat philosophy of life and how that should carry over in his death. If he were alive today, he clearly would be staggered by the number of people who took the time to listen.
I bought this book two years ago based on great reviews but couldn't get excited about reading a book about death. I even skipped the movie. But after finally...
Veröffentlicht am 1. August 2000 von R. Spell

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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen I was very disappointed
I bought this book with great expectations- I knew it was about a man at the end of his life, but I expected a deep look into his way of thinking, into his philosophy..instead, what I found was a mere outline of a wonderful person (Morrie Schwartz)...and lots of details about the author himself, that I'm sorry to say I didn't care about at all. All this running around...
Veröffentlicht am 4. Februar 2000 von Cassandra


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10 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Morrie tells his story & everyone listens, 1. August 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, A Young Man and Life's Greatest Lesson (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Morrie wanted to share his upbeat philosophy of life and how that should carry over in his death. If he were alive today, he clearly would be staggered by the number of people who took the time to listen.
I bought this book two years ago based on great reviews but couldn't get excited about reading a book about death. I even skipped the movie. But after finally picking it up, I throughly enjoyed the quick, insightful read that makes everyone re-examine their life's values, including me.
Morrie was clearly an exceptional human being. We've all had great teachers but this guy was the ultimate with the joy and love he took in his craft. Mitch Albom is a typical American caught in the American dream without realizing there is a problem. I applaud Mitch for writing this book and softly admitting some of his past sins. My only complaint is that I wish Mitch had been able to more definitely conclude the issues he may or may not have with his brother.
But this is Morrie's book. I spent the next day trying to recall if I had met anyone quite like him. It's difficult to live up to the high standards he sets. An excellent read and excellent lessons we should all remember.
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen A Teacher's Greatest Lesson, 17. Dezember 1999
Von 
Tuesday's with Morrie was a wonderful book. Mitch Albom, the author, describes his hectic life as a sports writer, jet setting around the world, but missing something. When Mitch accidentally sees his former teacher and mentor from college on Night Line with Ted Koppel, Mitch is curious and contacts him. Unfortunately, Morrie is dying from ALS and as their relationship grows, so does the ravages of this disease. Each Tuesday, Morrie and Mitch have a session where some of life's simplest ideas are discussed. Morrie maps out suggestions for living that are so simple and uncomplicated that Mitch and the reader cannot help but pay attention to such good advice. Some of Morrie's advice comes from tough experiences such as the death of his Mother when he was only eight years old. Morrie tells of never really getting over this tragedy and it was mostly because his father would not discuss it. Sadly, the telegram announcing his mother's death in a hospital is his only momento of her. Morrie decides to make his dying as untraumatic as is possible. He has plenty of time to say good-bye to loved ones and Mitch is included in this special group. Of course, this story cannot have a happy ending because this disease is incureable, yet Mitch is content in the end to go to Morrie's grave and talk while Morrie listens. As Morrie said those you love in this life are always with you in your memories. Professor Morrie Schwartz was a truly remarkable man and the sense of humor he kept through out his terrible suffering and humiliations he endured as his body shrunk to nothing is something I will always remember. Morrie Schwartz was the ultimate teacher and his life was the lesson we all should follow. This book tells you through out to stop and smell the roses. Talk to your friends and family as if you may not see them ever again after today. Love each other and don't let petty problems get in the way of any relationship that means something to you. We never know how many tomorrows we have left. Morrie Schwartz with his books, hibiscus plant and love for mankind was a great guy to know through this book. Mitch Albom did a great job and I recommend this book to anyone because we all share in the lessons Morrie had to teach.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen "A Great Teacher .. To The Very End", 21. Dezember 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, A Young Man and Life's Greatest Lesson (Gebundene Ausgabe)
TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE is a beautiful, true story filled with such wonder and wisdom. Although it is a "no holds barred" account of the impending ALS-inflicted death of Professor Morrie Schwartz .. the unselfish happiness that "oozed" from this gracious, gentle man .. far outweighs the inevitability of his death. His outlook on life .. and death .. is astounding! The story was chronicled on Nightline with Ted Koppel .. and in a TV movie that aired in early December of 1999. His philosophy teachings and love of life is evident in every page. He just plain "loved people" .. especially his students. He was kind enough to share the most precious gift any of us can ever give .. he gave "himself" .. to anyone and everyone who was willing to listen .. and that would share with him in return. He .. as I do .. believed that "sharing your love" and "a little of your time" can make "all the difference" in people's lives .. and that you will be overwhelmed with "what comes back" to you! He was a great teacher .. to the very end.
I was so touched by this book .. I read it in its entirety .. in one sitting. I hope you will "do yourself a favor" and pick up a copy .. if you haven't already.
Sandy Taylor
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A wonderful book, 6. Juli 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, A Young Man and Life's Greatest Lesson (Gebundene Ausgabe)
"Tuesdays with Morrie" is a book to be read by anybody who is interested in finding more satisfaction in their life. It reminds you of what it means "to be human" and encourages you to disconnect from the lures of our culture (money, material possessions, youth...) and reconnect with your spirit and what is essential to bring purpose and meaning to your life. Morrie who was stricken by a terminal illness also teaches us that if you do not resist the way your life shows up there is satisfaction in every moment of life no matter how challenging the circumstances. This essential message is taken further in the wonderful book "Working on yourself doesn't work" by Ariel and Shya Kane. "Working on Yourself doesn't work" is a gem among self awareness books. In a style very different from "Tuesday with Morrie", with a mixture of ideas and narratives, it delivers the keys to personal transformation and enlightenment. If your life is about discovering that state of being where satisfaction, self expression, aliveness and purpose reside don't hesitate to look up this very unique book also.
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6 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Incredibly good, 31. Januar 2006
Von 
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tuesdays with Morrie (Taschenbuch)
Tuesdays at Morrie's is an incredible book about how everything in life matters: An old professor - Morrie - knows that he will be dying, but instead of pitying himself, he is sharing everything that is important to him until the last minute. He talks with a former student of his about different themes of life and how he approaches them. Sharing his knowledge makes a huge difference in a lot of people's lifes.
It reminded me of "Working on yourself doesn't work" from Ariel and Shya Kane. A great book about going for your life with totality and excellence, but without fixing yourself. I know it sounds like a paradox, but this books gives you the tools how to have a magnificent life: day in and day out. I highly recommend it!
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Young Man's Fumbling Death Bed Learning, 19. Juli 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tuesdays with Morrie (Audio CD)
Professor Morrie Schwartz is the mentor we would all like to have. Often we fail to seek out such a mentor because we feel inadequate or not worthy enough. If so, you will identify with Mitch Albom who seeks out his teacher's wisdom for the final time in this book. His fumbling should reassure even the most inhibited person to reach out for this kind of connection. That's the hidden beauty of this book, as Professor Schwartz's goodness shines through the narrowness of Mr. Albom's life.

This wonderful book focuses on the meaning of life, from the perspective of a teacher (Morrie Schwartz) who is about to lose his life and his pupil, (Mitch Albom) who has lost his focus on what is important. They come together for 14 Tuesdays (just like they did while the author was a college student at Brandeis) before the professor passes away of ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease).

This book is filed with the most beautiful sayings you can imagine. Here are a few examples: 'Giving to other people is what makes us feel alive.' 'Love each other or perish.' 'Everybody knows they are going to die, but nobody believes it. If we did, we would do things differently.' 'Learn to detach from experience.'

Many people would avoid a book on this subject, because they do not want to think about death. Although Morrie Schwartz is dying throughout this book, the subject is really about living rather than dying. Few will find the dying to be distressing, even though it is graphically and frequently addressed.

For those of us with many years to live, this book can be a wake-up call to start really living now -- in the ways we would if we were about to die, as well as to learn how to treat others while we still have them with us. For those who have but little time left, this book can be an inspiration for how to get the most out of the remaining time.

You will probably find it heart-warming (as I did) to find out that the advance on this book was paid in time to help defray some of Professor Schwartz's medical expenses.

May you find new meaning in your life from reading this wonderful book! Life is a teacher, and Morrie Schwartz's thoughts can be a text to help you understand the lessons. Live well and make your choices consciously!
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen I was very disappointed, 4. Februar 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, A Young Man and Life's Greatest Lesson (Gebundene Ausgabe)
I bought this book with great expectations- I knew it was about a man at the end of his life, but I expected a deep look into his way of thinking, into his philosophy..instead, what I found was a mere outline of a wonderful person (Morrie Schwartz)...and lots of details about the author himself, that I'm sorry to say I didn't care about at all. All this running around & working non stop for money, that Mitch Albom talks about as if it's the only way somebody could live..I just disagree. Not everyone is like that, not everyone has to talk to his old teacher to get the idea that you have to really listen to & love the people around you. For some reason, Mitch Albom found this to be a very new & strange way of thinking, but in my opinion, it is the first & most important thing somebody should learn in order to live a full life, & to give to people around him. I don't know how I managed to finish this book- I found myself constantly annoyed by the author & his disbelief in everything that Morrie did or said- the fact that he didn't feel sorry for himself, the fact that he didn't realise he was at a dead end. Of course Morrie was in pain, of course he knew it was all over. But the fact that he had lived life to the fullest made him strong enough to accept death. I have no idea why this was so hard for Albom to understand. So the one thing that stays with me after closing the book is Morrie himself, his great courage & his honest & clear way of looking at life & death.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Life’s most important lessons – in a slim volume., 27. Oktober 2014
Von 
Peter Berlin "Osnabrueck" (Cologne, Germany) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, A Young Man and Life's Greatest Lesson (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Mitch Albom is the narrator of this book recalls Morrie Schwartz his favorite university with whom he promised to keep in touch after graduation – which, of course, he didn’t. Sixteen years after his graduation, Mitch feels increasingly disappointed with the life he leads. He focuses on his career and and tries to succeed. One day he is shocked to see Morrie on TV who is being interviewed because he is dying.

In his professional life he is increasingly aware that eh chases the wrong thing – celebrities who do not have much to offer but boredom and emptiness. He establishes a relationship with Morrie again and they agree to meet each Tuesday to discuss the lessons of life. Morrie did not have – on the outside – a very happy childhood. His father was cold and distant so Morrie tries to be the very opposite. In their meetings Mitch comes to realize that the wrong values are stressed in our society – there is a focus on greed, egotism and shallowness. Morrie learns to accept death and aging as the eternal cycle of life.

Obviously, the book touches on many topics that are relevant to each and every reader. As a living example Morries learns to accept that life has to come to an end and one’s happiness does not depend on material goods. A simple lesson but some we all need to be reminded again and again because it is way too easy top fall into the traps society sets up for us.

It is an easy book to read and highly recommendable for readers of all ages.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Repackaged platitudes, 29. Juni 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, A Young Man and Life's Greatest Lesson (Gebundene Ausgabe)
This book is unremarkable. ALS is clearly a terrible disease and Morrie clearly has some strength of character. However, the book's main messages -- enjoy the simple things in life, love one another, maintain a positive outlook, slow down, turn off your cell phone -- are poorly-communicated banalities. The book lacks depth and is written in a style that manipulates the reader's emotions rather than enabling a spontaneous reaction. Remove this book's disingenuous wrappings and you are left with a trimmed-down "Life's Little Instruction Book." Plus, I question some of Morrie's behavior. Close friends choosing to honor me with eulogies while I am still alive would be wonderful -- initiating such a 'living funeral' for myself would be a bit odd ("Come tell me how great I am before I die.") A favorite student choosing to write a book about my life would be wonderful -- planting the idea in his head and helping him outline the book would be a bit odd. And what about the author? Was Albom truly changed by his conversations with Morrie or has he gone back to his workaholic way of life? I suspect the latter since the author only spent his Tuesdays with Morrie since he was on strike and couldn't go to work. Finally, how did Morrie's wife Charlotte feel about all this? Would she say that -- by creating a media circus with Ted Koppel and camera crews filling the house -- Morrie lived up to his own aphorisms and made it clear how much he loved his family before he died?
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5.0 von 5 Sternen It's OK to Feel, 14. April 2000
Von 
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, A Young Man and Life's Greatest Lesson (Gebundene Ausgabe)
This is a great book for anyone, but I found it especially appealing for me as a man. Society dictates and brainwashes men to believe that feelings are "weak"; particularly sadness or grief. To be a "strong" man, you can't ever cry or shed a single tear...so society would have us men believe.
The fact of the matter is, though, that society is dead wrong. It's the *weak* man that never cries and the strong man who is fully in touch with his emotions - and fully able to express them.
And that's what this book deals with...the necessity for expression of feelings in order to fully experience life. Don't be misled by the book's size. It may be short, but that's part of the book's beauty. I was amazed at the simplicity of this book - bite-sized chapters make for a very easy read, but each one is full of important life lessons.
Morrie, the book's subject and a retired college professor, speaks frankly and tenderly to Mitch, an ex-student of his. And over the course of Morrie's last 14 weeks on Earth, he brings Mitch back from the frantic, frenzied mindset of today's materialistic society. He teaches Mitch to feel again...that it's OK to be mad, it's OK to be sad, it's OK to cry.
Morrie was a profoundly loving man who faced his certain death with a triumphant optimism. He loved fully, and thank God he left us with this book of wisdom. Mitch Alborn has truly painted an amazing portrait of courage, hope, and inspiration.
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Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, A Young Man and Life's Greatest Lesson
Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, A Young Man and Life's Greatest Lesson von Mitch Albom (Gebundene Ausgabe - 18. August 1997)
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