Kundenrezensionen


2 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (1)
4 Sterne:    (0)
3 Sterne:    (0)
2 Sterne:
 (1)
1 Sterne:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen An important book that everyone should read
"That Used to Be Us" delves deeply into the major problems confronting America. The book is well-written and uses a journalistic style similar to other books by Friedman: it includes a lot of anecdotes and quotations. The book starts by comparing a six-month project to fix two small escalators at a New Jersey train station with an eight-month project in China that...
Veröffentlicht am 9. September 2011 von S. A. Lee

versus
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Trivialitäten
Das Lesen einer Zusammenfassung, z.B. Rezension auf Amazon.com, reicht vollkommen. Die Autoren haben sich leider nicht die Zeit genommen, ihren Stoff deutlich zu kürzen. Im Gegensatz zum Vorgänger hat Friedman hier keinen Augenöffner geschrieben, lässt keine neuen Ideen aufkommen. Enttäuschendes Werk :-(
China ist dynamischer als die USA...
Veröffentlicht am 24. September 2011 von Stephan Wiesner


Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen An important book that everyone should read, 9. September 2011
"That Used to Be Us" delves deeply into the major problems confronting America. The book is well-written and uses a journalistic style similar to other books by Friedman: it includes a lot of anecdotes and quotations. The book starts by comparing a six-month project to fix two small escalators at a New Jersey train station with an eight-month project in China that resulted in the construction of a massive and ornate convention center. That comparison underlies the book's title -- the idea that the U.S. no longer leads the world in its ability to innovate and to efficiently create new things and ideas.

The book is divided into parts that focus on the major challenges we face: (1) Educating our workforce in an age where globalization and information technology have merged into a force that is disrupting job markets. (2) Overcoming the "War on Math," which has led us to recklessly cut taxes and ignore the impact of deficits and the growing dept burden, and the "War on Physics" which has led to rampant denial of the realities of climate change science and energy policy. (3) Political failure, driven by gridlock and the overwhelming influence of money in politics, and our failure invest in basic scientific research, critical infrastructure and to implement and maintain rational regulation of markets.

The part of the book that will perhaps be of particular interest to many readers is the discussion of how technology and globalization are impacting jobs and careers. The job market has been "polarized" so that routine, middle skill jobs have been eliminated, leaving only high skill jobs requiring lots of education and lots lower wage jobs that so far cannot be automated or offshored. There is a good discussion of the issues, again with lots of examples, but, as someone who works in developing these technologies, I think the authors actually underestimate the future impact here. They do not focus on the fact that information technology is accelerating and that the capability of computers and robots is going to improve dramatically over the next decade -- almost certainly threatening many jobs that we now think are safe.

For a much more in depth look on the future impact of technology on the job market and economy, I would recommend reading this book: The Lights in the Tunnel: Automation, Accelerating Technology and the Economy of the Future also Kindle edition: Kindle: The Lights in the Tunnel: Automation, Accelerating Technology and the Economy of the Future.

"That Used to be Us" is a very important book that will hopefully initiate a much wider and much more honest discussion about the challenges we face. To be sure, not everyone will agree with some of the solutions advocated (for example, increased immigration for skilled workers and a viable third party presidential candidate to deliver a shock to the political system) but the discussion of the major issues and tradeoffs we face is very well done and illuminating.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Trivialitäten, 24. September 2011
Von 
Stephan Wiesner (Switzerland) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(VINE®-PRODUKTTESTER)   
Das Lesen einer Zusammenfassung, z.B. Rezension auf Amazon.com, reicht vollkommen. Die Autoren haben sich leider nicht die Zeit genommen, ihren Stoff deutlich zu kürzen. Im Gegensatz zum Vorgänger hat Friedman hier keinen Augenöffner geschrieben, lässt keine neuen Ideen aufkommen. Enttäuschendes Werk :-(
China ist dynamischer als die USA? Überraschung, das kann man täglich in den Nachrichten hören. Die USA sollten mal wieder die Backen zusammenkneifen und mehr Arbeiten statt jammern? Gähn. Das mag alles stimmen, aber es ist nicht neu oder überraschend. Pers. habe ich keinen Nutzen aus dem Buch gezogen.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

That Used to Be Us: How American Fell Behind in the World We Invented
That Used to Be Us: How American Fell Behind in the World We Invented von Thomas L. Friedman (Broschiert - September 2011)
EUR 12,95
Auf Lager.
In den Einkaufswagen Auf meinen Wunschzettel
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen