Kundenrezensionen


51 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (8)
4 Sterne:
 (14)
3 Sterne:
 (11)
2 Sterne:
 (8)
1 Sterne:
 (10)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Was wäre wenn...die Südstaaten den Krieg gewonnen hätten?
10. September 1862, Frederick County, Maryland:

Entgegen den wirklichen Geschichtsgeschehen, ist die Geheimorder 191 von General Lee an seine Untergebenen, nie von Soldaten der Union gefunden worden. Die Südstaaten haben den Sezessionskrieg gewonnen. So beginnt die Einleitung in Turtledoves "How few remain".

Der Roman spielt im Jahre 1881 in den...
Veröffentlicht am 7. Oktober 2010 von NMK

versus
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting but slow
I liked this book, but I have discovered that I have a great interest in the genre, so I may be biased.
I enjoyed reading about Lincoln's hypothetical role as a Marxist, given that there was no reason to assassinate him. I found it a bit far-fetched until I read that the speeches his character gave in the book were really his speeches in history. Amazingly, Sam...
Veröffentlicht am 3. Januar 2000 von Amazon Customer


‹ Zurück | 1 26 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting but slow, 3. Januar 2000
Von 
Rezension bezieht sich auf: How Few Remain (Southern Victory) (Taschenbuch)
I liked this book, but I have discovered that I have a great interest in the genre, so I may be biased.
I enjoyed reading about Lincoln's hypothetical role as a Marxist, given that there was no reason to assassinate him. I found it a bit far-fetched until I read that the speeches his character gave in the book were really his speeches in history. Amazingly, Sam Clemens sounds just like Sam Clemens without taking the same liberties.
The US really did send troops to put down the Mormon practice of polygamy. The Mormons did not have great means to resist a United States Army, but given a little covert help, they might have resisted a distracted Union Army. (I think probably not, but it's not implausible.)
Other reviewers' criticisms of the plodding pace of the story, however, are not misplaced. How could the plot advance very quickly and end in a stalemate? I found the almost exclusive use of historical celebrities the only thing that saves this book from its plot. While I was not that interested in finding out how the war will end (it's telegraphed fairly obviously) I was interested in reading about the way characters develop when I thought I knew them (although creeping into Sam Clemens bedroom was uncalled for).
So, if you're a great fan of alternate history, I recommend this book. If you are just thinking about seeing what the genre is like, try Guns of the South or the World War series (if you like fantastic twists) or skip this one and go straight to Great War: American Front. There's plenty of backfill so you won't get lost.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Was wäre wenn...die Südstaaten den Krieg gewonnen hätten?, 7. Oktober 2010
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: How Few Remain (Southern Victory) (Taschenbuch)
10. September 1862, Frederick County, Maryland:

Entgegen den wirklichen Geschichtsgeschehen, ist die Geheimorder 191 von General Lee an seine Untergebenen, nie von Soldaten der Union gefunden worden. Die Südstaaten haben den Sezessionskrieg gewonnen. So beginnt die Einleitung in Turtledoves "How few remain".

Der Roman spielt im Jahre 1881 in den Nordstaaten. Die Konföderierte Staaten von Amerika haben unter Präsident Longstreet die mexikanischen Gebiete Sonora & Chihuahua für 3 Millionen CSA Dollar gekauft. Daraufhin spitzt sich die Lage mit ihrem Nachbarn, der Union, zu.
Es kommt zur militärischen Eskalation.

Harry Turtledove zeigt in seinem Buch auf, wie sich die Geschichte der Union und der Südstaaten hätte entwickeln können. Dies gestaltet er sehr interessant. Die Konföderation setzt immer noch auf die Sklaverei und ist mit England und Frankreich verbündet. Die Union steht alleine und als Aggressor da. Einzig das Deutsche Reich steht neutral zur Union.

Turtledove wählt für seinen Roman einen interessanten Erzählstil. Er beschreibt die Geschehnisse aus Sicht seiner Hauptcharaktere. Diese wären:

der gescheiterte Präsident der Union, Lincoln, Rosecrans und Pope, Stonewall Jackson, Jeb Stuart, Frederick Douglass, ein entflohener Sklave nun frei und Gegner der Sklaverei, Custer, Rosevelt und viele andere. Die Sichtweise der Personen auf das Geschehen gibt dem Roman einen besonderen Flair.

Bis auf ein paar kleine Schnitzer ist "How few remain" glaubhaft und spannend. Ein großer Schnitzer ist das Verhalten Custers in Bezug auf die "Gattling Guns". Zuerst lobt er sie in den höchsten Tönen und danach verdammt er sie.

Fazit: Spannend, glaubhaft, anders ...und bis auf eine Handvoll Schnitzer, die nicht wirklich ins Gewicht fallen, sehr gut.

"How few remain" ist das Prequel zur Serie "The Great War", die mit dem Roman Great War: American Front beginnt.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Great Prelude For The Coming World War Series!, 27. Juli 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: How Few Remain (Southern Victory) (Taschenbuch)
I found this book to be an excellent read, I cannot understand why so many people rated it so low! The book encompasses a wide range of characters and settings, ranging from a disgraced Abraham Lincoln to a triumphant Stonewall Jackson, victorious Confederate general of the 1st American Civil War. The book is set against the plausible background of a humbled United States, which has elected a 2nd Republican President, who is determined to put the seceded Confederate States in its place. He, President Blaine, would be thwarted in this goal by the intervention of Great Britain and France, in a war where the United States would find itself badly outmatched! The seeds for future US-vengeance on the Confederacy and her allies are been sown in this book, however, with the strengthening of US ties with Imperial Germany. As one of the prominent characters in this book is the German military attache, Von Schlieffen. We are also treated to such characters as a 22-year old Theodore Roosevelt and an unscalped Colonel Custer. All in all, a great read and is an excellent preview for the Great War Series!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1.0 von 5 Sternen How Few Remain, 22. Januar 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: How Few Remain (Southern Victory) (Taschenbuch)
Like many others who read this book, I had read "The Guns of the South" as my introduction to Turtledove and started with high expectations. Unfortunately, I have never been so dissappointed and exasperated by a follow-up novel. I actually had to force myself to finish the last few chapters.
The author begins by painting a cartoonish, unrealistic and simplistic picture of the US military and it's political leaders. He conversely paints the CSA military and political leaders in a soft John Wayne glow. The dialogue among the CSA military was similar to those old western movies--glib and overly cute. The US military leadership was relegated to constant drunkiness, stark idiocy and complaining about the President to each other and CSA leaders. Thinking that the US military and political leadership had learned nothing from a losing effort in the Civil War, and had produced no talent 20 years later from West Point or elsewhere is beyond comprehension.
There is plenty of illogical conduct among the characters. After Custer mows down Indians and Confederate soldiers with Gatling guns in one battle, why does Turtledove persist in him strangely seeing the weapon as nothing more than a useless carrot grater? Senior US military officers are constantly grousing about hanging Abe Lincoln or the current sitting President.
It was actually annoying in the manner that he worshipfully describes the CSA activities yet gives an idiotic US premise for invasion and conduct of a bloody battle in Louisville. He injects useless coverage of Sam Clemens, yet ignores his conjectured US President, James Blaine. Whereas in "Guns of the South", he was actually even-handed and plausible in his characterizations, he was sadly lacking here with such rich potential like Custer, Lincoln, Douglas, Jackson, Roosevelt and others.
It would not be a stretch to observe that he portrays the entire United States military and government as nothing more than Keystone Kops. I am hoping that his continuing series returns to the higher quality of the promising Guns of the South. A truly annoying read in this title, it's a mystery why such a talented writer could fall so quickly from grace with this one.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4.0 von 5 Sternen Why the North had to fight - and win - the Civil War, 11. Oktober 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: How Few Remain (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Students of the Civil War often fall into the trap of over-romanticizing the Lost Cause, without considering the future course of an independent Confederacy. Or, after contemplation of the war's tremendous cost in human suffering, they may decide that the war simply wasn't worth it - not for the South to secede, nor for the North to preserve the Union.
For both these pitfalls, How Few Remain is a sovereign remedy. It is not so much a popular novel as a compelling argument for why the Civil War had to be fought, and why the North had to win.
It is, first of all, a very different book than "Guns of the South." Guns of the South is a sci fi saga with a big deus ex machina (time travel) that creates an alternative future. It has skillfully drawn historical characters, and is a ripping good "read." It also presents a seductively positive view of an enlightened, post-war CSA.
Set in the 1880's, How Few Remain presents a darker, and much more plausible, aftermath of a Confederate victory: an apartheid CSA, allied with England and France; an embittered and militarizing USA, allied with the German Empire. How Few Remain is sometimes ponderous and frequently depressing. Turtledove takes full license in extolling those he admires (Longstreet, TR) and savaging those he despises (Custer, Pope). Notwithstanding these faults and indulgences, How Few Remain is a very fine work of alternative history.
The grim scenario for the twentieth century with a divided America is perfectly clear from the book, and you don't need to tackle Turtledove's massive sequel WWI tetralogy (American Front, A Walk in Hell, etc.) unless you really like Turtledove's writing, and can take it in unlimited doses.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2.0 von 5 Sternen One trip to the well too many, 13. Januar 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: How Few Remain (Gebundene Ausgabe)
I've read and throroughly enjoyed Mr Turtledove's previous works: Agent In Byzantium, The Videssos Cycle, The Tale of Krispos, The WorldWar tetralogy, The Two Georges.
The above titles had historical elements and figures given a sharp twist but each story has a plot, some action, the plight of the main characters was tops in the reader's concern. In the course of the books, a lot of things happen and come to change the main characters.
In this offering, Mr Turtledove gives this formula one more try but several elements are stretched too thin. I found none of the characters interesting or endearing. In the end, I couldn't really care less about what happened to whom.
The author correctly surmises that to win the first Civil War, the south must push for an early armistice: 1862. The author does this. Mr Turtledove lays a solid foundation on which to build his speculation.
The slave owning south is pictured favorably throughout the text, but being a reader from the XXth century, I can't warm up to individuals or to a society that openly espouses slavery.
The bumbling racist North doesn't earn anything as underdogs either.
Teddy Roosevelt and the Custer brothers come across not so much as historical figures but as Bad B Movie Cowboys from Hollywood.
Only Mark Twain brought some light to an otherwise dim and dark environment.
The sin of below average character development is not the worst. Nothing really happens.
The "war" is a series of small go nowhere commando raids lead by incompetent boobs.(Stonewall being the exception)
But overall, not much happens. And shortly after the war begins, the ending is telegraphed to the reader (and represents the book in a nutshell) when the South offers the North another quick Armistice (with some arm twisting by the European Powers) with the borders reverting to pre-war conditions and the USA accepting the sale of Mexican Territory to the CSA.
In short, the situation described at the beginning of the book becomes the conclusion. Whatever happens (or happened) in between does not change anything. Nor has it. The only real change is that Tom Custer and Jeb Stuart and many many infantry grunts died. The rest go back doing what they were doing in Chapter 1.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1.0 von 5 Sternen This is the best the industry has to offer?, 1. Dezember 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: How Few Remain (Southern Victory) (Taschenbuch)
It wasn't but thirty pages into reading that I found myself skipping ahead to get to the exciting parts of this heavily worded novel. If Turtledove was looking to write a plausible history, then this work is more miss than hit. I did like the idea of the war starting over the purchase of Mexican territory, but for a leader of a nation to just fly off the handle and declare war struck me as a little odd. It would have been more plausible if perhaps the U.S. attempted to outbid the C.S.A. and war resulted due to some covert action from both sides. Also, I was interested in how Theodore Roosevelt developed since commanding a regiment at such a relatively early age, however the circumstances were nearly insane. A British invasion of Montana instead of the previously U.K.-U.S. disputed Oregon Country (Washington and Oregon)? It would be easy to keep Roosevelt in the fray if his regiment were shipped over to Washington State to help some hard pressed troops there. Also, if plausiblity is an issue with writers and readers of alternate history, then something must be said about what Turtledove thinks about the Mormon church. With a little research, a good author will find that never in the history of the church has the leadership sanctioned rebellion from the U.S. government. So, why all of a sudden change that. A much more interesting story would have Custer sent to the Mormon leaders to "ensure" raising of a regiment to be sent south to face Stuart. Then, the question of religious bigotry wouldn't come to mind in the case of Mr. Turtledove. All in all, this is a potentially good story that's been hashed by the "master". I have only read this book and I don't plan on wasting money on another written by him. Harry Turtledove has been hailed as "The Master of Alternate History". Is this a self-proclaimed title? Yes or no, in my opinion, the field is wide open.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2.0 von 5 Sternen interesting premise; ho-hum execution, 20. Juli 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: How Few Remain (Southern Victory) (Taschenbuch)
This book demonstrates the classic Turtledove alternative history strengths: very intersting, provocative opening premises, as well as the classic Turtledove weaknesses: often the premises are the most interesting parts of the book. The opening premise: that the Confederates did not lose Gen. Lee's battle plans before Antietam, and went on to win that campaign, is an excellent example of how capricious history can be -- minor events can have monumentous consequences. He also explores an interesting -- and not at all implausable -- foreign policy reprecussion of Franco-British support for the Confederacy: growing understanding between the Union and Bismarck's German Empire. (This also sets up the universe for his projected FOUR BOOK series on WWI). Where the book bogs down (and where Turtledove as a stylist often comes up short) is in the characterizations of his main players. Turtledove may have had great fun with his Samuel Clemmens, such as depicting him fighting wri! ters' block (an ailment the fecund Turtledove seems not to share), but overall the treatment of Clemmens is wordy and flat, and we learn precious little of the motivations behind his anti-war views. Similarly, the treatment of the Union war effort in 1881 seems unhistoric. One might expect that a main focus of the Union Army from West Point on down after 1862 would be how things went wrong and and how to correct said mistakes. Perhaps Turtledove deals with this by depicting Union commander Rosecrans as being astounded when he learns that Germans planned things before going to war, but it seems implausable that the War Department -- after a stinging defeat like losing the Civil War -- would do no thinking whatsoever on future conflicts, especially with the dreaded Confederacy. Anyhow, those disappointments aside, the book does raise some interesting questions and does demonstrate how major events can hinge in small doings. The concept of a pro-German USA and a pro-British CSA ! in 1914 is fascinating. I hope Turtledove's projected tetra! logy on that conflict makes better use than he usually does of a tasty premise.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen If the South had won the Civil War and Alienated the North, 8. Juni 1998
Rezension bezieht sich auf: How Few Remain (Southern Victory) (Taschenbuch)
I thoroughly enjoyed Harry Turtledove's "How Few Remain." I think this is one of his better alternate history books. It was gripping; I could hardly wait to find out what would happen. As usual, the last hundred pages were slow; I wish he could write better endings. The ending also left one up in the air, so it was a let down. I probably liked this more than most because I read a lot of military history.
This book was not what I expected. I expected a continuation of his "Guns of the South" where Afrikaners go back in time with automatic weapons to help the south create a haven for anti-black sentiment. The basic premise of this book is that the Confederate States won in 1862, and it is 20 years later after winning a major victory and with the intervention of the British and French. The Union resents the loss. Longstreet is the Confederate president, Stonewall Jackson is in command of the Confederate Army with Stuart in command of the West. The Confederate States buy two Northern Mexican provinces such that they now have access to the pacific. The American president, the first Republican to be elected since Lincoln (who is still around and advocating workers rights), uses this as an excuse to go to war even though the Army has not been maintained in the intervening years.
I have issue with many parts of the book:
- Custer started the book as a colonel with his own regiment. He did not do that well at West Point, and would probably not have been popular with most of his superiors. He also did not have the family connections.
- Harry Turtledove did not take advantage of a very successful Confederate General who did well at West Point, had the family connections a to be appointed a lieutenant colonel in 1861 at the age of 23. Joe Wheeler was apparently also charismatic. The most telling is the fact he fought in the Spanish American War as a Major General.
- Why would the British invade through Montana. Supply would have been almost impossible, they could not use their strong Navy, and the! re would have been little gained except to cut the railroad. It would make much more sense to invade the Oregon territories. There would not be many more people to deal with in this territory than Montana.
- Once the Union invaded Mexico, there would not have been much political impact of the Confederates invading the New Mexico Territory. I do not think the Union East would have cared much what happened in this desert. Might have been some issues with an invasion of California, but the New Mexican Territories! From there could have threatened railroads in Colorado. Also, helping the Mormons would have helped them. Usually helping the enemy of my enemy is
- Why didn't the Confederates take advantage of regular units be pulled from Kansas to put down the Mormon insurrection, and why, after Custer's Unit left Utah, didn't the Mormons revolt again, especially considering how badly they had been treated. Even a better question is why throw in the Mormon insurrection at all considering how little it seems to have impacted the rest of the story. Also, considering
- Why throw in the Custer's affair and Roosevelt's one night stand. They appear to have nothing to do with anything else.
- When he created a regiment for the Spanish American War, Theodore Roosevelt signed on as a lieutenant colonel because he did not think he had the experience to the colonel. He found someone with experience to be the colonel. I would expect him to do the same thing as a young man. I am sure there would be some people in Montana with experience during the Civil War as a senior officer.
- What was the point in having Stuart assassinated by the apaches, and why would he be personally worrying about the apaches with the Union still effectively at war with the Confederates. Chasing the apaches put him way up in the mountains, where it would have been difficult for him to personally deal with any effort by the Union. I could understand sending a regiment after the apaches, but that would not have required Stuart to be there.<! P>- Why didn't the Confederates have enough men available to more readily contest the second crossing of the Ohio River. They knew that the Union was preparing such a crossing, and could have conserved men in Louisville since they were on the defensive in highly defensible terrain. Would have expected Stonewall to do the same as the Germans did in Italy.
Despite all these comments, I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys alternate history. Turtledove is probably the most significant writer ever in this field, and this is one of his serious works in alternate history. Due to problems with accuracy, I would not be so enthusiastic to recommend it to Civil War Buffs, although they might not consider the problems in the book that serious.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4.0 von 5 Sternen Provocative Reading for Civil War Enthusiasts, 24. Dezember 1997
Von 
Rezension bezieht sich auf: How Few Remain (Gebundene Ausgabe)
The best part of Harry Turtledove's "How Few Remain" is the first six pages, in which he develops a completely believable alternate history which would have resulted in a Confederate victory in 1862. Turtledove could have built an entire novel around these six pages, but instead pushed forward to 1881, and a second Civil War, whose premises were far less believable. I did not find it credible that the U.S. would find a casus belli in the Confederate purchase of two
Mexican provinces, yet would permit the Confederate Army to plant artillery on Arlington Heights and other strategic points overlooking Washington, D. C. without any protest or military action against such an obvious threat to national security.

Turtledove also portrays the U.S. as the economic power it really was in the 1880's, which also makes a premise of the book--a nearly non-existent U.S. Navy, an essential for a nation engaged in such trade and commerce--also hard to believe. It is also inevitable that Great Britain would have had hundreds of millions of pounds invested in the U.S. by 1881, if this scenario were true. It would have thus been incredible for the British to wage war against the U.S. on behalf of the Confederacy, as is portrayed here, without risking the expropriation of all that capital by the U.S. as reparations.

Finally, given the rise of such young Union army leaders in the armies in the western U.S. theatres during the Civil War, such as James McPherson, Philip Sheridan, and John Schofield (the latter two actually became generals-in-chief of the U.S. Army), it was really a stretch to believe that the best the U.S. could come up with to oppose Stonewall Jackson in Turtledove's book were Orlando Willcox and William Rosecrans. Surely, at least one of the former three would have risen to prominence in the Indian wars afterward, and to higher rank.

Even with these flaws, Turtledove does make you think about the alternatives to historical events, and that these were not foregone conclusions, as historians often portray them. The reader can imagine the subsequent historical changes which will result from these twists of history. The future which is foreshadowed here is actually quite ugly and foreboding, compared to actual history.

Turtledove certainly does not mask his prejudices toward such characters as Longstreet, Custer, and James G. Blaine, which is the author's privilege. Whether you agree with him or not on his portrayal of these men and the events that unfold, the book is worth reading to Civil War enthusiasts if only to provoke further debate among them.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 26 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

How Few Remain (Southern Victory)
How Few Remain (Southern Victory) von Harry Turtledove (Taschenbuch - 29. April 1998)
EUR 6,07
Auf Lager.
In den Einkaufswagen Auf meinen Wunschzettel
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen