Kundenrezensionen


89 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (57)
4 Sterne:
 (17)
3 Sterne:
 (10)
2 Sterne:
 (1)
1 Sterne:
 (4)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


9 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen "Wash it all down with the Perrier-Jouët 1892 Champagne." (Fitzherbert)
Ken Follett will surely solidify his reputation as a master of the pop historical epic with "Fall of Giants," the first installment of a hugely ambitious work-in-progress called the Century Trilogy. As the series title indicates, it recounts - or begins to recount - the chaotic history of the 20th century. Set against this historical panorama are the intertwined lives of...
Vor 22 Monaten von Charles C. veröffentlicht

versus
85 von 94 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Nice story, but not high quality
Ken Follet knows how to tell stories. This is true again for this book. It is easy to dive into the plot and forget the world around you. You get acquainted with the characters fast and and are anxious to know what is going to happen to them and how they make out on their way. Therefore, it is a great book to just forget everday-life and have many hours of reading...
Veröffentlicht am 30. September 2010 von Sir Arthur Conan Poe


‹ Zurück | 1 29 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

9 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen "Wash it all down with the Perrier-Jouët 1892 Champagne." (Fitzherbert), 16. Oktober 2012
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Century 1. Fall of Giants (Taschenbuch)
Ken Follett will surely solidify his reputation as a master of the pop historical epic with "Fall of Giants," the first installment of a hugely ambitious work-in-progress called the Century Trilogy. As the series title indicates, it recounts - or begins to recount - the chaotic history of the 20th century. Set against this historical panorama are the intertwined lives of about a hundred characters. Don't worry, six pages at the front of the book are devoted to the cast of characters.

The giants of the title, the crowned heads of Europe, are firmly established in their palaces when the narrative begins in 1911 but all gone (except King George V of Britain) when it ends in 1924. In between, various upheavals remake the world, affording plenty of scope for action, and Follett takes full advantage of this opportunity. Apart from the destinies of the monarchs, we follow the intertwined fates of five families, in Wales, England, Germany, Russia and America. Among them a Welsh coal miner and his suffragist sister; an arrogant English earl who is their nemesis; two orphaned Russian brothers, one a scoundrel, one a working-class hero; a pair of star-crossed lovers, she sister of the British earl, he son of a Prussian nobleman, and so on. Kaiser Wilhelm makes a couple of cameo appearances and Churchill has a brief role as an acerbic guest at a country home. We stop in at Wilson's White House and sail with the idealistic president to Europe in 1919 in his vain attempt to sell peace to the world through his League of Nations. Lloyd George and Lenin step onstage once or twice. However accurate their depictions, neither they nor the novel's lesser characters are sufficiently fleshed out to come across as much more than convenient vessels of exposition to carry the story forward.

Follett is so concerned with with stark economic and social contrasts that he opens the story in 1911 on the Coronation Day of King George V, at the same day Billy William turns 13 and begins his wretched life as a coal miner - and the mine is located near the Fitzherberts' stately country home, built on the labors of the miners below. Billy's sister, Ethel, is a housekeeper in the Fitzherberts' mansion and in love with the earl until, out of social necessity he refuses to acknowledge paternity of the son he has with her. Ethel quits her job and moves to London with the child. Subsequently, she and Billy and other characters oppressed by the class system seek liberation in the heady atmosphere of the progressive politics of the day. This is the book's main theme: the superiority of broad-mindedness and liberal thinking over adherence to the old ways, especially those exemplified by a decadent aristocracy. The theme lacks subtlety, but it provides dramatic conflict and an easy story line to follow. Follett understands that his average reader's knowledge is probably rusty, accordingly, he meticulously reconstructs an era and leads us through the follies and occasional heroics of its protagonists. His narrative includes most of the major battles of World War I and events elsewhere, including the failed 1905 uprising against the czar that led 12 years later to the Russian Revolution, perhaps the strongest of the novel's set pieces.

Follett has a comprehensive grasp of the historical record and the ability to integrate research into a colorful, engaging narrative. He's especially effective in describing the buildup to the war, when all hopes of peaceful resolution gradually faded, when arrogance, patriotic belligerence and monumental shortsightedness paved the way for the catastrophes that would dominate the coming decades. Although his tale has flaws, it's readable to the end.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


85 von 94 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Nice story, but not high quality, 30. September 2010
Ken Follet knows how to tell stories. This is true again for this book. It is easy to dive into the plot and forget the world around you. You get acquainted with the characters fast and and are anxious to know what is going to happen to them and how they make out on their way. Therefore, it is a great book to just forget everday-life and have many hours of reading fun.

However, as it is often the case with Ken Follet, the author's weak points are his characters - or the lack of them. The book does not contain any characters, it contains types. We never meet any interesting, complex personalities, we meet THE innocent boy, THE virtuous girl, THE capitalist, THE rich guy and so forth. The acting persons are either 100% good or 100% evil and never in between. This makes their actions predictable and an otherwise great story stale.
This circumstance and the announcement that this book is the first one in a series of sequels, seems to make the book a mass product wich the author is interested to sell rather than a book that was written with passion. I am pretty sure that we will meet the very same "characters" in one way or the other in the sequels, just in different situations or historic settings.

Therefore I rate the book with 3 stars - a nice story for entertainment, but don't expect a masterpiece or an exceptionally original piece of work.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Animierter Geschichtsunterricht, 25. März 2013
Von 
Felix Richter - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)    (REAL NAME)   
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Century 1. Fall of Giants (Taschenbuch)
Ken Follett ist kein Autor im herkömmlichen Sinne, sondern Repräsentant eines Unternehmens, das sich auf die Produktion von Romanen spezialisiert hat. Das widerspricht dem Bild, das sich der Leser vom einsam in seiner Schreibstube sitzenden, sich allenfalls mit den Lektoren seines Verlages herumstreitenden Sätzeschmied macht, und löst unter Puristen Einiges an Naserümpfen aus. Etwas, was anderen Kreativen anstandslos nachgesehen wird (Komponisten, Maler oder Architekten hatten und haben oft zahllose Zuarbeiter), gesteht man der Schriftstellerei irgendwie nicht zu.

Fest steht, dass es ohne diese Arbeitsweise Bücher wie "Fall of Giants", den ersten Teil der Century Trilogy, nicht gäbe, zumindest nicht alle zwei bis drei Jahre. Ein Autor allein wäre niemals in der Lage, den Recherchieraufwand zu betreiben, mit dem ein historisch so verlässliches Ergebnis zu erzielen ist. Ken Folletts Bücher sind animierter Geschichtsunterricht, und an dem, was wir hier über den ersten Weltkrieg lernen, hätte sich zum Beispiel mein Geschichtslehrer (ruhe er in Frieden) eine dicke Scheibe abschneiden können. Es ist beeindruckend, mit welcher Leichtigkeit Follett komplexe politische Zusammenhänge zum Beispiel im Rahmen eines eher informellen Tischgesprächs erklärt.

Die Nachteile der industriellen Romanproduktion sind ebenso offenkundig. Man sieht stets noch das Reißbrett durchschimmern, an dem die Handlung entworfen wurde. Ähnlich wie bei Filmdrehbüchern wechseln sich Hintergrundberichte, Action, Romanzen und der unvermeidliche Sex in regelmäßigen Intervallen miteinander ab, sodass die Aufmerksamkeitsspanne des Lesers nur selten überschritten wird. Die Biographien der einzelnen, fiktiven Charaktere (aus Wales, Deutschland, Russland und den USA) sind so eng miteinander verwoben, dass diese sich immer wieder über den Weg laufen und Gevatter Zufall doch sehr oft aushelfen muss (das war allerdings auch die einzige Möglichkeit, die gewaltige Anzahl von Personen in einem noch erträglichen Rahmen zu halten). So wird manches auch sehr vorhersehbar, denn alte Bekannte müssen ja wieder auftauchen, zum Beispiel am Frontabschnitt genau gegenüber.

Als deutscher Leser eines britischen Autors ist man verblüfft, wie ausgewogen Follett darlegt, auf welche Weise Europas Staatslenker den 1. Weltkrieg mutwillig herbeigeführt haben (ein russischer Leser sieht das möglicherweise anders). Überhaupt bringt er es fertig, dass der Leser stets auf der Seite desjenigen ist, mit dem er gerade den Schützengraben teilt. Und wie schon in "Pillars of the Earth" ist Follett das Schicksal des kleinen Mannes besonders wichtig. Hier, bei den wiederkehrenden Konflikten zwischen den Davids und den Goliaths, hat der Roman seine stärksten Momente. Amüsant auch Folletts kleine Attacken gegen den englischen Boulevard, der ja auch heute noch allzu gerne in Kriegsterminologie verfällt, wobei es heute ja gottseidank überwiegend um Fußball geht.

Alles in allem ein lesenswertes Buch, kein Sprachkunstwerk, aber handwerklich solide und höchst informativ, und auch für Nichtmuttersprachler leicht verdaulich.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


17 von 21 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Fall Of Giants, 31. Oktober 2010
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Absolute Spitzenklasse. Bringt Geschichte lebendig und verständlich: wie hing und hängt das Handeln einzelner "Potentaten" zusammen. Mit welcher Leichtfertigkeit und Verantwortungslosigkeit haben unsere politischen Führer Millionen von Menschen in den Tod geschickt. Mit welchem Hochmut hat der sogenannte Adel das Volk gering geschätzt, ausgenutzt und missbraucht. Und das ganze Gemälde voll Spannung und Emotion. Ich habe die rund 1000 Seiten in einer Woche Krankenhaus "hineingefressen" und von meinen Schmerzen nichts mehr verspürt. Buch ist etwas schwer zu halten, aber leicht zu lesen. HP.Görres,Psychotherapeut.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen story approach to history, 23. März 2013
Von 
Lucy M. "cute & cool" - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(VINE®-PRODUKTTESTER)    (TOP 1000 REZENSENT)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Century 1. Fall of Giants (Taschenbuch)
Follett's first volume of the trilogy Fall of Giants follows the lives of some families in different countries around the world. This is a story of the time period which encompasses the World War I and the Russian revolution. This time period is a rich one to examine, not only because of all events like political upheaval, technological advancement, struggles for women's right to vote, but also because of the subtile differences between the classes.

In the beginning of the story in June of the 1911 enters Billy Williams on the day of his 13th birthday as grown man the mines in a small town of Welsh. In Westminster Abbey in London an other event happened; the crowning of King George V.

At the beginning of the 19th century there was no middle class in England and Welsh yet, but two extremely different classes. To go from one extreme to an other, you will find the working class of miners, who barely gets enough to eat and lives in small unheated stone-houses. The another one is the upper class who lives a life of privilege and extremely luxurious. Such as the Earl Fitzherbert's family, who owns among other things also the coal mines and count as one of the richest ones of England.

The characters; the Earl, married to one of Russian princess, his sister Lady Maud, falls in love with Walter von Ulrich, who is working at German embassy in London. Billy's older sister Ethel, is working for the Earl Fitzherbert but takes a fateful step above her position as Earls housekeeper.

The story moves from London to St. Petersburg in Russia, where two brothers Grigori and Lev Peshkov live. They are orphans but already grown up set out on very different paths half a world away from each other when their plan to emigrate to the America falls apart because of the war and the revolution.

In America Gus Dewar, a law student in Washington, D.C. is working for the President, Woodrow Wilson, in the White House. His family is an important political dynasty of Washington D.C. and finally, the Vyalovs family of Russian immigrants in America with businesses in Buffalo.

All the characters are placed perfectly in their playing and each of these characters and a raft of others find their lives entangled in this saga of unfolding drama, from the dirt and danger of a coal mine to the glittering chandeliers of a palace, and intriguing complexity. Follett's stories are quite engrossing and they let me see events from various national and cultural points of view. So that after finishing I've really felt as though I've witnessed this all.

Ken Follett is a well respected and a tremendous writer of historical fiction and I am very fond of him since I enjoyed very much his greatest novels The Pillars Of The Earth and World Without End. Ken Follett's story lines are gripping and his characters are interesting, sympathetic and human. I enjoyed this book for its history and atmosphere and I also learned a lot only by reading. In the matter of fact, after it I also was able to understand better what led to the World War I. It is actually a good change of pace to the books of the mysteries and thrillers that I usually read.

Follett is adept at moving the interrelated stories along so that the plot never felt plodding, not at all. This book is rather long, but it is moving fast. I would say, pretty good historical fiction. Now, I couldn`t wait to dive into the next book, because I am very interested in to see how the families continue.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen An entertaining History lesson, 11. Januar 2011
Von 
Birgit Goldenbow "Tigrib" (Meerbusch) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(VINE®-PRODUKTTESTER)    (REAL NAME)   
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Follet shows a picture of a historic time and introduces the reader to the feelings of people from different social background. This time he additionally interlinks the stories of some British, with German/Austrian, Russian and US-Amercian families from 1911 through to 1924.

There are too many characters and historic moments to get into detail, but the story is a light read and additionally I have learned a few things about our recent history which I was not aware of.

Best described are the lifes of Welsh miners and aristocrats to give you an impression of the changes in Britain. The short episodes of people from Russia, USA and Germany on the other hand sometimes seam a bit superficial. But all in all Follet once again draws a colourful picture of a historical time and develops an overall impression and understanding of the changes which took place accross Europe at the beginning of the 20th century.
I am looking forward to the development of the characters during the buildup of the second world war.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


21 von 28 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen "You Are There" Vividly Recreated in Astonishingly Intertwined Families and Relationships, 13. Oktober 2010
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
"Like a cloak You will fold them up,
And they will be changed.
But You are the same,
And Your years will not fail." -- Hebrews 1:12 (NKJV)

Isn't it interesting that on the day I wrote this review, the hardcover book retailed for quite a bit less on Amazon than the Kindle version? Who would have thought that could be possible for a book that's almost 1,000 pages long?

As a youngster, I was fascinated by the CBS televised history series, "You Are There," which was narrated by Walter Cronkite. These re-enactments of critical moments made history interesting and understandable to me in a delightful way that helped turn me into a history major in college. I'm deeply grateful for the experience.

I was fascinated to see that Fall of Giants was designed to take a similar approach, while adding the desirable qualities of multiple narrators with different perspectives, much interaction among the characters, and a family saga element that provides even more depth of understanding. Even though I am quite familiar with the histories that are related here, I found myself wondering what historical lessons would be added to the comments made by the "future-looking" characters who often serve as quasi-prophets in the stories. A lot of historians must have worked very hard to be sure that so many historical insights made it into this novel. Fall of Giants has a surface accuracy that's quite impressive. I suspect that a lot of people will learn more about 1911 through 1923 in the UK, Russia, Germany, and the United States from this book than from any history courses that have taken or might take in the future.

When I saw the list of characters, I couldn't for the life of me imagine how they might relate to one another across cultures. The nicest surprises in the book came from the many unexpected little events that Mr. Follett used to bring his characters together and to draw them apart. I couldn't wait to get to the end to see what inventions he would use.

The book emphasizes the story lines of:

aristocracy losing to meritocracy
integrity being better than popularity and wealth
new ideas replacing tradition
duty versus responsibility
women seeking more equal opportunities
male egos being harmful to everyone else

Watch out that you don't read any detailed descriptions of how the characters' stories develop. You will lose a lot of the joy of the book should that occur.

I like books where the main characters have many chances to make decisions, to express themselves, and to deal with adversity. From the combination, I can get to know and understand them much better. Fall of Giants really delivers in that way for characters such as Gus Dewar, Earl Fitzherbert, Lady Maud Fitzherbert, Walter von Ulrich, Grigori Peshkov, Ethel Williams, and Billy Williams.

I am excited that there are two more books in the trilogy to come. I'm ready!

Bravo, Mr. Follett!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


3.0 von 5 Sternen Hab mehr erwartet..., 13. August 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Da ich versch. Bücher von Ken Follet verschlungen habe und auch die zahlreichen positiven Rezensionen hier gesehen habe, habe ich mir die beiden erstem Bände der Century Trilogy für meinen Kindle gekauft.
Doch leider werde ich schon den ersten Teil nach der Hälfte anseite legen - und ich hasse es ein Buch nicht zuende zu lesen.
Aber leider springt bei diesem Buch der Funke einfach nicht rüber.
Das Setting ist interessant und lehrreich, es gibt viele interessante Charaktere aber nichts davon überzeugt mich wirklich.
Die Geschichte "plätschert" so vor sich hin ohne dass man mitgerissen wird und sich immer fragt was denn nun weiter geschieht.
Schade eigentlich aber ich kann das Buch nicht weiterempfehlen.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


3.0 von 5 Sternen Auf und ab, 16. August 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Anfangs fand ich das Buch sehr spannend und konnte es kaum aus der Hand legen. Zur Mitte hin zieht es sich etwas und man kann das Ende irgendwann kaum noch erwarten - aber nicht weil es so spannend, sondern so zäh ist. Das Ende steht bei mir noch aus, aber egal wie es sich nun wendet, mehr als drei Sterne kann ich für dieses Buch leider nicht mehr vergeben!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Interessanter Roman zum Ersten Weltkrieg, 13. Juli 2014
Von 
karin1910 - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 1000 REZENSENT)   
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Nachdem ich die deutschsprachige Ausgabe dieses Romans schon vor einigen Jahren gelesen hatte, war der „Kindle Deal des Monats“ ein guter (und perfekt zum Weltkriegsjubiläum 2014 passender) Anlass, mir nun auch das Original vorzunehmen.

Dieser erste Teil von Ken Folletts Trilogie zum 20. Jahrhundert umfasst den Zeitraum von 1911 bis 1924 und porträtiert eine Reihe interessanter Personen, durch welche eine Vielzahl unterschiedlicher Nationalitäten, Gesellschaftsschichten und Lebenseinstellungen repräsentiert werden.
Obwohl hier relativ viele Protagonisten auftauchen, fällt es (auch dank des Personenverzeichnisses) dennoch nicht schwer, den Überblick zu behalten. Die Figuren sind nachvollziehbar, wenn auch bisweilen etwas klischeehaft, charakterisiert, ihr Schicksal ist aber oft ziemlich vorhersehbar. Außerdem sind sie alle irgendwie zu „nett“, für meinen Geschmack fehlen echte Bösewichte.

Nichtsdestotrotz ist dies sicherlich ein lesenswertes Buch. Man merkt, dass der Autor viel Mühe auf die Recherche verwendet hat. Es wird sehr gut herausgearbeitet, zu welchen bedeutenden politischen und gesellschaftlichen Umwälzungen es in dem betreffenden Zeitraum gekommen ist und wie sich diese auf das Leben der einfachen Bürger ausgewirkt haben.

So kann man hier eine spannende und in historischen Romanen bisher selten behandelte Epoche quasi hautnah miterleben.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 29 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

Century 1. Fall of Giants
Century 1. Fall of Giants von Ken Follett (Taschenbuch - 1. Juni 2011)
EUR 7,70
Auf Lager.
In den Einkaufswagen Auf meinen Wunschzettel
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen