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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A must read for families facing Alzheimer's Disease
My Husband, Tom's, neurologist recommended that I read this book as a means of helping me understand what was happening to Tom's brain. Tom died of Alzheimer's in 1995. This book is not about Alzheimer's but in many ways it gave me more insight than anything else I read. I reasoned that if the brain can manifest the extremes in behaviors and misinterpretations...
Veröffentlicht am 8. Februar 2000 von Beverly Bigtree Murphy MS, CRC

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3.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting but superficial overview of clinical cases
Reading this book, I felt like touring a museum of curiosities, getting an overview of a large number of clinical case, without any in-depth analysis or understanding of the patients. Overall, the book felt cold and detached and I found myself wanting to know more about each person described, on their personality. They felt too much like lab experiments instead of human...
Am 13. Juni 1999 veröffentlicht


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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A must read for families facing Alzheimer's Disease, 8. Februar 2000
My Husband, Tom's, neurologist recommended that I read this book as a means of helping me understand what was happening to Tom's brain. Tom died of Alzheimer's in 1995. This book is not about Alzheimer's but in many ways it gave me more insight than anything else I read. I reasoned that if the brain can manifest the extremes in behaviors and misinterpretations exhibited in the case studies Dr. Sacks highlights then perhaps a brain deteriorating randomly, as it does in Alzheimer's, can also mainifest similar behaviors and misinterpretations. It helped me immesnsely in figuring out what was behind his behaviors and his losses and I dared to allow myself to enter his world and see that world through his eyes. I detail some of these moments of insight in my book, "He Used to be Somebody, A Journey Into Alzheimer's Through the Eyes of a Caregiver," and how this insight translated in his care. (Tom died in our home after a 14 year battle with this disease. If he knew nothing else he knew his was loved. We should all be so lucky.) Dr. Sacks never loses sight of the human being facing the challenges he writes so eloquently of. He has that quality which allows him to see past the symptoms and into the soul of the person. The lesson is that the disease does not define the person. Alzheimer's is no exception. I highly recommend this reading for families and professionals working with this Alzheimer's and other dementia.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A great read for any person interested in the human mind, 10. März 2000
Von Ein Kunde
I loved this book. I read it as an undegraduate English major, and it fascinated me with its accounts of people with various neurological deficits and excesses. Non-medical professionals will have no trouble appreciating Sacks' writing, which is clear and free of complicated medical jargon.
For me, the book stimulated much thought on the nature of the human mind, and the concept of the Self that we all carry. It's one of my all-tme favorite books, one I would recommend to readers who enjoy literature and works of philosophy.
Looking over the other reviews, one sees a lot of 4 and 5 star reviews, with the occasional "I hated it" review. For exmaple, one reader cited what she called Sacks' "horribly cruel and unempathetic tone." I didn't detect such a tone in Sacks' writing, and I'm surprised that anyone did. I guess it is a matter of perecption, and depends upon your own experiences, etc. Some people have very definite ideas about how medical cases should be discussed; this book did not offend any of my ideas on that subject. I highly recommend it.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Very Good Reading, 16. Mai 2000
Von 
This is an excelent book! The clinical tales are captive and you will not feel like stopping the reading. The mysteries of the brain misfunctions are exposed and you would probably never think that such cases would ever happen. If you like this book I would strongly suggest "Defending the Cavewoman" from Doctor Klawans ( he and Oliver Sacks were friends. Also Oliver Sacks is very clear and shows an extraordinary knowledge not only from his field but also from philosophy and a great sensibility with his patients delicate situation.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Fascinating, 3. Oktober 1998
Von 
M. Broda "ScuzzBuster" (Indianapolis) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
The first thing I did after reading this book was to hop back onto Amazon.con and order "Awakenings" and "An Anthropolgist on Mars." This book was recommended by one of my philosophy professors in college about six years ago. Well, it took me six years to pick it up, and I don't regret the decision. As a complete layperson, my eyes were opened to what a complex piece of machinery the brain is. Sack's personal perspective on these patients disorders is what takes this interesting material and makes it fascinating reading. The only problem I had with this book was that I was disappointed to see most every chapter end. I wanted to know more about most every case. I only rank it 4 instead of 5 for that reason (It could have been more in-depth) and a couple of the cases were simply mildly interesting rather than mind-bending. It's almost imcrompehensible to perceive the world and one's self in the same manner as some of these unfortunate people. I was especially intrigued by one of the questions Sack's brings up concerning the case history discussed in the chapter "The Lost Mariner." A man can remember nothing for more than a few seconds. His entire life, all of his experiences are gone almost as soon as they are past. "He is a man without a past (or future), stuck in a constantly changing, meaningless moment," Sacks writes. Sacks then ponders the question that will stop your heart: "Does he have a soul?" If you have ever been bothered by the question of the spiritual nature of man, Sacks --who stops well short of reaching any theological conclusions -- will disturb you with this material. From that standpoint, he is brilliant at informing by simply forcing the reader to ask questions of his or her self...questions which Sack's himself admits even he has no clue as to the answers. This book could change your perspective on life, or simply entertain you as an interesting novelty. In any case, I very highly recommend it...can't wait to get into "Anthropologist" next.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Very interesting clinical studies, 26. Januar 2000
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John IV (Snohomish, WA United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
This is an astonishing book, it chronicles the various, notable, cases treated by Dr. Sacks. People who had deficiencies in perception or over compensation in senses are presented w/ taste and humanity and never reduced to objects. The case studies while clinical are presented in a compassionate narrative that makes it accessible to the lay person. Questions of personal identity always interested me during my philosophy classes and a few of these cases actually provide firm factual bases for the theories postulated. In the chapters he touches on people who become no longer aware of their physical attributes or presence, people who lose their memories after 10 minute spans, making up reality as they go along, and people who suffer amnesia of a type where they are unable to progress beyond a certain date in time, thinking it's the 1940's. Towards the end he touches on autists, those with hyper-abilities with numbers, or art, yet are unable often to talk or express themselves otherwise. I highly recommend this book, and wish it would have been in the curriculum for some of my philosophy of mind classes. I will be reading more of Dr. Sack's works.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Sacks, lives and videotape., 20. März 2000
Oliver Sacks, famed neuropsychologist, holds a unique position amongst popular science writers following the film dramatisation of his book Awakenings. 'The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat' reinforces his standing as a brilliant medic and gifted communicator. A balanced approach to the writing makes it accessible to scientist and lay man alike.
The book successfully refrains from clinical coldness but the distinct nature and number cases creates a slightly curt, stop-and-start feel.
I feel that one ought to note that the insight Sacks gives us owes much to things learnt from illness and damage to particular regions of the brain. I appreciate that this may hit a little close to home for those who have a more intimate understanding of such conditions. Sadly, a case study would never do true justice to the patients' personalities, fears and strengths. However, Sacks' tone is never dispassionate and the ingenuity of some of his patients shines through.
All in all, this remains an interesting and somewhat awe-inspiring introduction to the workings of the mind.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Sacks reveals the depth and mystery of the human psyche, 6. November 1999
Von Ein Kunde
A well-known neurologist, Sacks writes of his experiences dealing with different clinical case histories. Sacks reveals the depths of the human psyche, drawing a picture of each patient's case in clear language, and infuses one with a sense of wonder at the human condition. It's comprehensible for the layman as well as the specialist, although non-medically oriented readers may find some of his neurological references difficult to follow. A fascinating book that will take the reader, in the author's own words, on a "magic carpet ride", Sacks, in this book, is more of a story-teller than anything else. He focuses on the specific personality and uniqueness of each patient, rather than on actual clinical treatment and outcome of each one.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Fascinating and easy to read, 4. Mai 1999
Von 
David Graham (Shell, Ecuador) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
If you have not read any of Oliver Sacks' books, this is probably the best place to start. This collection of 24 clinical case histories is written so as to be of interest to both lay and informed readers alike. Without espousing a particular philosophical or metaphysical viewpoint, Sacks' subjects and his commentary force the inquiring reader to ask some of the great, probing questions about our existence. With a perceptive, critical eye for clinical observation and a widely read store of medical knowledge, Sacks writes with true compassion for his patients. Sacks thus shows how both the science and art of medicine should come together in the best tradition of medical practice.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Engrossing Set of Neurological Portraits in Miniature, 15. April 1999
Von Ein Kunde
This collection of neurological case studies, related in meticulous and mellifluous narrative language, minimally opens a window into the workings of the brain and, with time and patient reflection, makes the reader consider his/her own inner workings and how s/he might react under similarly dehumanizing pathologies. The poignant "The Lost Mariner" is particularly powerful; the horrifying plight of the time-lost central character will stay with you forever. I take issue with the strongly negative reaction of the San Francisco reviewer; Sacks never displays less than a profound sympathy and compassion toward his patients.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Well-written and sympathetic; not condescending, 17. Dezember 1999
I always find Sacks's works well-written and moving. He seems to have the gift of putting himself in the patient's place, never condescending, always accepting.
It's unfortunate perhaps that some reviewers find Sacks 'disrespectful' to the 'mentally ill'. But Sacks's patients aren't mentally ill; they have neurological illnesses. To confuse the two is to grievously insult both the mentally ill *and* the neurologically ill. As a neuro patient I've had my fill of the falsely kind, condescending and ignorant; Sacks is none of the above, and that is why his works are so appealing.
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The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat
The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat von Oliver Sacks (Taschenbuch - 2. September 2011)
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