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6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen I would give it many more than five stars
First of all let me say that I absolutely loved The Red Tent. It's based on a character, Dinah, who is mentioned in passing in the old testament. Diamant has created a wonderful story about the women of biblical times, our fore-mothers Rebecca, Sarah, Rachel, and Leah, from Dinah's point of view.
You do not have to be familiar with the bible to enjoy this novel,...
Veröffentlicht am 31. Juli 2000 von Andrea Merkowitz

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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Not a true Christian Fiction
While this book is beautifully written and presents a unique persona-point-of-view, it does not fit into the category of Christian Fiction by definition. Most Christian fiction presents a person in situations that lead him into a more intimate relationship of God and Christ. While this book portrays interesting facts about cultural practices of societies in Biblical...
Veröffentlicht am 17. Juli 2000 von Shannon C. Martin


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6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen I would give it many more than five stars, 31. Juli 2000
Von 
First of all let me say that I absolutely loved The Red Tent. It's based on a character, Dinah, who is mentioned in passing in the old testament. Diamant has created a wonderful story about the women of biblical times, our fore-mothers Rebecca, Sarah, Rachel, and Leah, from Dinah's point of view.
You do not have to be familiar with the bible to enjoy this novel, although if you are, you'll certainly recognize stories and characters. It's about the strength of women, their roles in a male dominated religious society, and their all important relationships.
Although I was eager to read this book, I didn't expect it to have such an impact on me, nor did I expect to love it as much as I did. Highly recommended.
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5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Women and Judiasm...fascinating, 28. Juli 2000
If you have a strong interest in the feminine side of Judiasm, or just feminism in general, this book is for you. This was the kind of book that I could not put down. I began it on the plane and read it straight through. It is definately on my top ten list. The author takes a small story from the Hebrew Bible and expands it into a novel from the women's point of view. The story includes characters such as Rebekah, Rachel, Leah. Some more conservative readers might find portions of the book blasphemous (especially the implied Asherah worship), but I think the book accurately reflects the practice of the times. A most compelling read!
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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen I am usually disappointed by most novels, 17. Juli 2000
But not this one. I read this in two gulps and could hardly tear myself away from it. Being pregnant, some of the birth scenes were a little intense for me but this is one of the best books I've ever read. I despair of ever writing such amazing characters!
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Not a true Christian Fiction, 17. Juli 2000
Von 
While this book is beautifully written and presents a unique persona-point-of-view, it does not fit into the category of Christian Fiction by definition. Most Christian fiction presents a person in situations that lead him into a more intimate relationship of God and Christ. While this book portrays interesting facts about cultural practices of societies in Biblical times, it does not do as I described above. It also greatly deviates from the Biblical descriptions of Jacob and his family. Rebecca was not a pagan prophetess and Joseph was not a petty man full of himself and his power while a vizier of Egypt. I don't believe this book should be listed under the category of Christian fiction. It is misleading.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen A TRUE Feminist Tale, 4. Juli 2000
Von Ein Kunde
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I read it in two days as I was fascinated by this culture of "the red tent". This story is earthy and sensual, as I'm sure it was intended to be. And it truly celebrates women as lifebearers and healers and mothers rather than workaholics who have no more ambition that getting paid the same to do a man's job. In a time where women disdain being mothers or they choose to work instead of raise their children and run their home in a healthy way, this book is an inspiring detour into the old world.
The story, however much it deviates from the true Biblical account, (and I'll get to that in a minute), captivated me. The Bible uplifts women and gives them a higher place in its story that any other literature of its time, but not much is said about Dinah because her story is not the primary reason that Moses recounts the tale of Jacob and his sons.
And here is where I have a little beef with Diamant. Her bio says she's written plenty of books on Judaism, but you'd never know she was Jewish by her emphasis on the absolutely pagan practices of Jacob's family in this book. On this level, Diamant's story is wholly untrue for Jacob and his sons never worshipped any God but the one true God, "El" as he is referred to in this novel. Jacob's wives, at least once they left Laban's care, also worshipped this God and all that stuff about sacrificing to the Queen of Heaven and what not is pure fiction. I did not mind that, at many points in the story, Diamant deviates from the Biblical account (i.e. Dinah's in Shechem or the switch LABAN pulled on Jacob when he was supposed to be marrying Rachel). Its dramatic license and she does not claim to be writing new Scripture or anything... but when it comes to their pagan practices, I was really disturbed. I don't know what my point it... I just wish, on this point, she had stuck with the true story. Its ironic because I enjoyed the first section of this book most of all and that was the most pagan! I just threw off the fact that Diamant was retelling a Bible story and pretended it was entirely fiction.
In short, I highly recommend this book to every woman, especially if anyone feels the need to feel uplifted in her femininity. Feminists need to read this book- hopefully they will come to realize that there is equal value in being a housewife and a mother than there is in being a CEO or a lawyer (and having the homelife be the center of your life)- you might not get paid, but the spiritual significance, the absolutely vital importance of these roles in the life of the world cannot be matched by any job. I believe this may be what Diamant is saying, in the end. This is what I got out of it, at least.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen A Well written fiction that completely breaks from the Bible, 1. Februar 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Red Tent (Gebundene Ausgabe)
One cannot deny that Diamant is a gifted writer. I agree with another reviewer who compared this book with Zimmer Bradly's The Mists of Avalon (complete with the goddess worship, and revisioning of traditionally viewed "bad" characters). It may have been Diamant's intention to subvert the Biblical text. She succeeds in doing this. The foremothers are goddess and idol worshippers; the forefathers'connection with God seems to pale in comparison. The only men presented in a positive light are ones who the bible clearly sees as negative. Dinah only finds happiness when she leaves the monotheism of her family for the pagan worship of the Egyptians. While other reviewers are anxious to share this with their daughters, I am not anxious to tell my daughter that the foremothers merely put up with the monotheism of their husband but remained worshippers of idols.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen An excellent, fascniating, historical saga, 5. Juli 2000
Von 
This is one of the best books I have ever read! Technically, it's the story of Dinah, the daughter of Jacob and Leah. The story is based on the old Testament, but it's fictionalized, told from Dinah's perspective. It's a fascinating story about families, love, and life, and it's completely relevant to the present as well. I can't describe how much I enjoyed reading this book, and how I hated to reach the end!
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4.0 von 5 Sternen A TRUE Feminist Tale, 4. Juli 2000
Von Ein Kunde
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I read it in two days as I was fascinated by this culture of "the red tent". This story is earthy and sensual, as I'm sure it was intended to be. And it truly celebrates women as lifebearers and healers and mothers rather than workaholics who have no more ambition that getting paid the same to do a man's job. In a time where women disdain being mothers or they choose to work instead of raise their children and run their home in a healthy way, this book is an inspiring detour into the old world.
The story, however much it deviates from the true Biblical account, (and I'll get to that in a minute), captivated me. The Bible uplifts women and gives them a higher place in its story that any other literature of its time, but not much is said about Dinah because her story is not the primary reason that Moses recounts the tale of Jacob and his sons.
And here is where I have a little beef with Diamant. Her bio says she's written plenty of books on Judaism, but you'd never know she was Jewish by her emphasis on the absolutely pagan practices of Jacob's family in this book. On this level, Diamant's story is wholly untrue for Jacob and his sons never worshipped any God but the one true God, "El" as he is referred to in this novel. Jacob's wives, at least once they left Laban's care, also worshipped this God and all that stuff about sacrificing to the Queen of Heaven and what not is pure fiction. I did not mind that, at many points in the story, Diamant deviates from the Biblical account (i.e. Dinah's in Shechem or the switch LABAN pulled on Jacob when he was supposed to be marrying Rachel). Its dramatic license and she does not claim to be writing new Scripture or anything... but when it comes to their pagan practices, I was really disturbed. I don't know what my point it... I just wish, on this point, she had stuck with the true story. Its ironic because I enjoyed the first section of this book most of all and that was the most pagan! I just threw off the fact that Diamant was retelling a Bible story and pretended it was entirely fiction.
In short, I highly recommend this book to every woman, especially if anyone feels the need to feel uplifted in her femininity. Feminists need to read this book- hopefully they will come to realize that there is equal value in being a housewife and a mother than there is in being a CEO or a lawyer (and having the homelife be the center of your life)- you might not get paid, but the spiritual significance, the absolutely vital importance of these roles in the life of the world cannot be matched by any job. I believe this may be what Diamant is saying, in the end. This is what I got out of it, at least.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen A TRUE Feminist Tale, 4. Juli 2000
Von Ein Kunde
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I read it in two days as I was fascinated by this culture of "the red tent". This story is earthy and sensual, as I'm sure it was intended to be. And it truly celebrates women as lifebearers and healers and mothers rather than workaholics who have no more ambition that getting paid the same to do a man's job. In a time where women disdain being mothers or they choose to work instead of raise their children and run their home in a healthy way, this book is an inspiring detour into the old world.
The story, however much it deviates from the true Biblical account, (and I'll get to that in a minute), captivated me. The Bible uplifts women and gives them a higher place in its story that any other literature of its time, but not much is said about Dinah because her story is not the primary reason that Moses recounts the tale of Jacob and his sons.
And here is where I have a little beef with Diamant. Her bio says she's written plenty of books on Judaism, but you'd never know she was Jewish by her emphasis on the absolutely pagan practices of Jacob's family in this book. On this level, Diamant's story is wholly untrue for Jacob and his sons never worshipped any God but the one true God, "El" as he is referred to in this novel. Jacob's wives, at least once they left Laban's care, also worshipped this God and all that stuff about sacrificing to the Queen of Heaven and what not is pure fiction. I did not mind that, at many points in the story, Diamant deviates from the Biblical account (i.e. Dinah's in Shechem or the switch LABAN pulled on Jacob when he was supposed to be marrying Rachel). Its dramatic license and she does not claim to be writing new Scripture or anything... but when it comes to their pagan practices, I was really disturbed. I don't know what my point it... I just wish, on this point, she had stuck with the true story. Its ironic because I enjoyed the first section of this book most of all and that was the most pagan! I just threw off the fact that Diamant was retelling a Bible story and pretended it was entirely fiction.
In short, I highly recommend this book to every woman, especially if anyone feels the need to feel uplifted in her femininity. Feminists need to read this book- hopefully they will come to realize that there is equal value in being a housewife and a mother than there is in being a CEO or a lawyer (and having the homelife be the center of your life)- you might not get paid, but the spiritual significance, the absolutely vital importance of these roles in the life of the world cannot be matched by any job. I believe this may be what Diamant is saying, in the end. This is what I got out of it, at least.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Rebuttal to May19th Review from Seattle, 7. Juni 2000
I would like to take a moment to address some of the complaints made in the May 19th review. I did not experience THE RED TENT as male bashing. It's intent was to take a female view of the major women of the Old Testament and to breathe life into them. It is "over endowed" with a female viewpoint as a counterbalance to the bible's male view. Women in the BIBLE were often hardly more than property, so it is not too surprising that a fictionalized female character from this period might see men somewhat differently then we do. The BIBLE does portray Laban as a pretty disagreeable character, but in this book Jacob is portrayed as a tragic figure, not a negative figure. He is not the cause of the terrible massacre, but assumes the guilt of his tribe. Until then he is a respected male figure in the book. The women have their weak points as well. Rachel is vain, and the grandmother, Rebecca is a formidable figure of both arrogance and power. Isaac's trauma as a child, being nearly slaughtered by his own father, was treated with compassion. Diamant has Dinah speak of this trauma and how it left Isaac with a stutter for the rest of his life. Some of the women are weak in a way that makes them disagreeable. The carpenter husband of Dinah, Benia, is a truly admirable and loveable male figure and her young husband, the prince Shalem, slaughtered at the hands of her brothers, is as gentle and romantic a young man as you could want.
As to the continual reference to pregnancies and childbirth, I believe this had a deliberate intent. During biblical times, childbearing is what gave women power. It is natural to assume that women of that period would indeed be obssessed with their own ability to bring children into the world - especially women of strength who would be able determine ways to use that ability to some advantage. The very nature of the Red Tent, was that it bonded women in a way that as a group gave them more leverage. Their "mysterious" ways were kept from the men who were somewhat fearful of their rituals and knowledge of childbearing. This was a woman's main source of power in a life that was in many ways powerless. Being a mid wife was as close to a career as a woman could have and it commanded respect from everyone. You have to remember that men and women did lead very separare lives at that time. Another source of power, still "mysterious" to men, was the role of a priestess and ordainer. Rebecca had this role down to a science in order to insure her place of distinction in the ancient world. I present these ideas as a difference of opinion to the previous reviewer, who is of course entitled to her opinion. I had my book group meeting last night and our book of discussion was THE RED TENT, so these themes were very much on my mind and I felt compelled to respond.
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Red Tent
Red Tent von Anita Diamant (Taschenbuch - 8. März 2002)
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