Kundenrezensionen


7 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (1)
4 Sterne:
 (3)
3 Sterne:
 (1)
2 Sterne:
 (2)
1 Sterne:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


42 von 44 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Tour de force? Tortur de force? Jedenfalls ein enormer Kraftakt
Wow, was für ein Roman!

Dies war mein Gedanke, als ich nach einem einwöchigen Kraftakt Robero Bolanos Roman "2666" aus der Hand legte. Das Wort "Kraftakt" ist hierbei durchaus wörtlich zunehmen, denn die mehr als 900 Seiten, in denen 80 Jahre Geschichte menschlichen Übels (das Massenmorden im Dritten Reich und die Entführung,...
Veröffentlicht am 21. November 2008 von Herr Cooles

versus
4 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Was soll man davon halten?
Die Handlung kurz zusammenfassen zu wollen ist schlicht unmöglich, deshalb wohl auch der seltsame Klappentext.
Bolanos Sprache (bzw. die Übersetzung) ist schon sehr ... fahrig, diffus in seiner Erzählweise, während er gleichzeitig sehr präzise seine Begrifflichkeiten wählt. Aber mich hat sein Erzählstil (besonders die über...
Veröffentlicht am 19. Februar 2010 von Leonidas


Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

42 von 44 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Tour de force? Tortur de force? Jedenfalls ein enormer Kraftakt, 21. November 2008
Rezension bezieht sich auf: 2666 (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Wow, was für ein Roman!

Dies war mein Gedanke, als ich nach einem einwöchigen Kraftakt Robero Bolanos Roman "2666" aus der Hand legte. Das Wort "Kraftakt" ist hierbei durchaus wörtlich zunehmen, denn die mehr als 900 Seiten, in denen 80 Jahre Geschichte menschlichen Übels (das Massenmorden im Dritten Reich und die Entführung, Vergewaltigung und Ermordung mehrerer Hundert Frauen im fiktiven mexikanischen Santa Teresa - wohl das reale Juárez) behandelt werden, sind quantitativ eine Menge zu bewältigen, qualitativ kein Stoff für den sensiblen, kurzatmigen Leser.

Ohne zuviel von dem (enormen) Inhalt preisgeben zu wollen/können, kann ich Folgendes berichten: Das Buch handelt vordergründig von der Suche vierer europäischer Akademiker nach dem mysteriösen, pynchon-esken deutschen Romancier Benno von Archimboldi, der zuletzt eben in Santa Teresa, Mexiko, gesichtet wurde. Dieser Arnimboldi war im 2. Weltkrieg Soldat der deutschen Wehrmacht in Russland und wurde danach Schriftsteller. Bolano verwebt die Suche der vier, das Morden der Mexikanerinnen und das Grauen im 2. WK geschickt in vier Teilen, von denen jeder leicht ein eigener Roman hätte werden können.

Was mich an diesem Roman fasziniert, beeindruckt oder schockiert, ist, dass er nur scheinbar Antworten bietet. Doch weder Bolano noch von Arnimboldi vermag das Grauen in Santa Teresa noch das massenhafte Morden im 2. WK zu erklären. Insofern beschreibt er eine menschliche Zivilisation, die scheitert - die in all ihrer Größe scheitert.

Also, wer in diesem Winter Zeit, Atem und Mut hat, soll sich mit diesem Roman auseinandersetzen. "Genießen" im herkömmlichen Sinne (Belletristik!) kann man ihn wegen seiner Länge (nicht Längen!!!) und seines schwerverdaulichen, im Ganzen doch düsteren Blicks wohl nicht. Ich hoffe, dem 2003 verstorbenen Autor nicht Unrecht zu tun, indem ich nur 4 Sterne vergebe.

Hoffe, dass es hilfreich war.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


12 von 14 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen A Set of Diamonds in the Rough, 10. Januar 2009
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: 2666 (Gebundene Ausgabe)
I have a hard time imagining that any new novel I read this year will fill me as completely as 2666 did. I encourage you to read the book with interest, but without the expectation of perfection.

In 2666, the monumental novel that has brought so much joy to readers since the 18th and 19th centuries returns in the twenty-first century. Roberto Bolano displays enough breadth of vision to give Dickens something to think about. It's hard to describe this book without giving away details that might spoil your pleasure, but it's clear that everything and everybody are connected. That's also part of the attraction . . . because you want to know what all the connections are.

Bolano's 2666 provides a perspective that we don't get often enough in monumental novels, that of a novelist. In Part 1 "The Part about the Critics" we meet four academics who build careers (and indeed personal lives) around a little-appreciated German novelist, Benno von Archimboldi whom they have never met. The author's name alone will give you a clue that not all is as it seems. This story is by turns wicked satire, patronizing descriptions, tendentious morality tale, and hilariously warped view of the academic part of the literary establishment and its goings on. Only the obvious escapes them in their desire for privacy, comfort, career, and avoidance of loss. Before this part ends though, you'll feel like a strong magnet is pulling you and the characters towards an important appointment, one that will initially resist your understanding.

In Part 2 "The Part about Amalfitano" you will get to know Amalfitano who lives with his daughter Rosa in Santa Teresa, Mexico, a border town south of Tucson where sweat shop factories draw willing young workers from all over Mexico. You might think of Amalfitano as eccentric (after all, he has a book pinned to his clothes line based on something that Duchamp had once recommended), but it eventually turns out that he is a man in close contact with himself and reality. He is an educated man (a professor) from Europe who finds himself in a dusty town where the values are the opposite of any culture that he values. Like many of the characters, he has interesting dreams that help tell the story and enjoys the world of ideas. Some will see him as a stand-in for Don Quixote.

In Part 3 "The Part about Fate" you meet Oscar Fate (born Quincy Williams), an African American who is pulled away from his normal reporting to cover a boxing match in Santa Teresa. Fate doesn't have a clue about boxing and knows perhaps less about Mexico. Once there, he meets Guadalupe Roncal, a reporter from Mexico City, who wants to write about the many women who are being sexually attacked and killed in the Santa Teresa area. After the fight, Fate meets Rosa Amalfitano and eventually her father. Fate becomes our eyes into a culture that is terribly dangerous for women. Before the part's end you meet a mysterious blond giant.

In Part 4 "The Part about the Crimes" you will read in nauseating detail about what has been happening to women in and around Santa Teresa. Bolano buries you through repetition into being numb about the horrors, the callousness of those who prey on the women, and the attitudes of the police and other officials in the context of a very male chauvinist culture. By the end of this part, you'll piece together what's going on . . . which is more than the investigators do. I advise you to read this segment when you are in a good mood and in small doses.

In Part 5 "The Part about Archimboldi, you get to look behind the author's legend to meet the man and his family. It's the best part of the book and reminded me a lot of reading what Gunter Grass had to say in Peeling the Onion about emerging as a writer. Bolano adds power by dropping in little stories and events that complete and magnify other parts of the book. I savored this part right up to the final shoe dropping.

Bolano has an amazing ability to pile story on top of story on top of story so that you are seeing the subject (or the world) through an endless series of mirrors that display all dimensions simultaneously. His imagination to do this is immense. Due to his untimely death as he raced to finish this work, I don't think that these complex structures always received the polish they deserved. For instance, there are a few facts of 2666 that are never finished. Clearly, a good editor would have helped Bolano to flesh out such chinks in the reflective surface.

The translation often seems rough. You can tell because other parts are extremely smooth and well developed. It's not clear how much of this is due to the original not being fully polished or the translation being rushed.

To me, a monumental novel has to convey a sense of what the world is really about. You see that in a work like Crime and Punishment. Bolano also shares his worldview through the actions his characters take and their fates. The philosophy is clearly summarized by John Donne in that we are all connected and the loss of any one is a loss to all. Much of the story's development can be seen in the context of Catholic theology with many of the references unavoidable (such as the crucified general). Bolano's view is also that every thing we think or do affects everyone else. Ultimately, he sees us as all tied together because we are attracted to one another (even if the attraction is sometimes a perverse one). Behind all of these connections is a strong force drawing us to right wrongs, even when there seems to be no chance to succeed.

Although you can feel that the book spends too much time on the tawdry, its ultimate message is a very positive and life-affirming one . . . you can make a positive difference, if only you make the effort.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


17 von 20 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Wunderschön, schockierend und anspruchsvoll, 7. Februar 2009
Rezension bezieht sich auf: 2666 (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Einfach wunderbar, dieses Buch.
Da die bisherigen Rezensionen schon recht ausführlich waren, hier meine Kurzform:

- Ganz schön dicker Wälzer, für die tägliche Dosis Literatur im Zug also nur schwer zu verwenden.
Das war's auch schon an Negativem.

+ Wunderschön geschrieben, große Literatur, ein toller Schriftsteller.
Leider konnte ich wegen meiner dafür nicht ausreichenden spanischen Sprachkenntnisse das Buch nur in der englischen Übersetzung lesen, aber wenn es da schon so klasse ist, muss das Original göttlich sein.
+ Packende Handlung.
Die häufig wechselnden Textabschnitte/Absätze/Kapitel legen ein ganz schönes Tempo vor, und man möchte das Buch am liebsten gar nicht mehr weglegen (was bei dem Umfang aber leider hin und wieder sein muss). Immer wieder Unerwartetes, Neues, Schockierendes wie Berührendes, und man ist als Leser immer mittendrin. Fesselnd von der ersten bis zur letzten Seite.
+ Interessante Charaktere, hoher literarischer Anspruch und dennoch sehr angenehm lesbar!
Die mysteriöse Geschichte um Benno von Archimboldi (die ich hier nicht vorwegnehmen will) besiedeln viele sehr vielschichtige Charaktere. Neben der im Moment viel zu großen Liebesgeschichten-/Vampirroman-/Krimi-Anhäufung in deutschen Buchläden ist 2666 eine sehr anspruchsvolles und doch wunderbar angenehm zu lesendes Stück Literatur.

Alles in allem: Kaufempfehlung für alle, die beim Lesen gerne mitdenken, und sich nicht nur berieseln lassen um dann auf die (kitschige) Verfilmung zu warten...
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen "Maybe we would make it out of that hellhole alive." (R. Bolaño), 9. Juni 2013
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: 2666 (Gebundene Ausgabe)
The author, born in 1953 in Santiago de Chile moved to Mexico City at the age of 15. After several tumultuous years as political activist and bohemian poet he settled in Catalonia in 1977 where he died of liver failure in 2003 before he could finish this ambitious novel, however his literary executors considered the book fit to publish in 2004. Bolaño liked detective stories by master hard boilers like Dashiell Hammett, Ray Chandler, James M. Cain and the like. However, the pulpy atmosphere of unsolved mystery quickly disappears behind the book's five sections, each with an autonomous life and form and all eventually coursing a snake track through the Sonoran desert. Yet, all stories are intertwined like portraits of Renaissance painter Giuseppe Arcimboldo who created heads with fruits, flowers, vegetables and books.

As in Bolaño's earlier book The Savage Detectives, this novel's center is the search for a lost writer. Four literary critics from different European countries are obsessed with a cultish but mysterious German novelist called Benno von Archimboldi. Hence there are many references to painting and the visual generally begins to take on great importance in the novel.

At a chance meeting in France, dubious evidence indicates that Archimboldi may be living in Santa Teresa, a squalid and sprawling Mexican border town, both a victim of globalization and the mother lode for all sorts of human rot, blaring music and stinking dumps in the Sonora Desert which becomes the locale of the next two sections. There the focus is adjusted on Amalfitano a depressive Spanish literature professor and his daughter Rosa, as well as on Oscar Fate, an African-American journalist from New York, who is staying in Santa Theresa to cover a boxing match coming up in town. Now the tone darkens and bits of conversation are heard in bars and restaurants - references to "the killings". It slowly surfaces that Santa Teresa is the stage for murders of unimaginable horror.

The killings in question - the murders of young women - have been occurring there for several years (the novel is set in the mid to late 90s). Bolaño's fiction suddenly sounds like grisly fact and Santa Teresa imaginatively becomes the real border town Ciudad Juárez, which indeed gained notoriety in the early 1990s for the extraordinary number of women and girls murdered, many of them raped, some tortured and most of them dumped in garbage heaps or like litter in the empty desert surrounding the town. The murders had begun to increase steeply in about 1993, almost parallel with the drug trade and a fast climbing number of new maquiladoras (foreign-owned assembly plants for export). For several years, on an almost weekly basis, bodies of young women would turn up and the majority were workers in these maquiladoras. Several arrests were made but this almost unbelievable femicide continues to this day, although at a lower rate. An extremely high percentage of the cases were unsolved (often the bodies weren't even identified) which implies that the murderers have connections. Rumor has it that they are protected by either corrupt police officers, narcos or even politicians or maquila bosses, so the truth remains everybody's good guess.

These real events became the background for Bolaño's novel to elevate the eternal question of Mexican violence to the highest level of intensity. The fourth section is the shocking centerpiece covering about 300 pages in which he describes the murders chronoligically in the cold, language of a medical examiner dictating his report: where each body was found, the cause of death and even the state of decomposition, "anally and vaginally raped" is a depressingly continuous and even euphemistic statement. As the bodycount continues to rise and all the investigations don't reveal any clue, it becomes obvious that the author is describing his own vision of hell where even horror becomes meaningless.

The theme's randomness and control over history spill over into the last part of the novel, it is an odyssey through Bolaños "realismo visceral" or the fight of the individual to survive with functioning ethics. Now the life of Archimboldi is disclosed, but not to the literary critics who started the search for him, he and his history become visible to the reader only, he shows signs of cynicism and naiveté but he never develops a life of his own and remains just a sombre conception, although one that is able to find beauty beyond the meaningless, the horrors of our time. The author feels free of any school of thought or a theory, he just searches for moral questions and otherwise shows what is possible in a novel - which means, well, anything. Maybe this way he has come close to re-inventing the novel.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Was soll man davon halten?, 19. Februar 2010
Von 
Leonidas - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(VINE®-PRODUKTTESTER)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: 2666 (Taschenbuch)
Die Handlung kurz zusammenfassen zu wollen ist schlicht unmöglich, deshalb wohl auch der seltsame Klappentext.
Bolanos Sprache (bzw. die Übersetzung) ist schon sehr ... fahrig, diffus in seiner Erzählweise, während er gleichzeitig sehr präzise seine Begrifflichkeiten wählt. Aber mich hat sein Erzählstil (besonders die über mehrere Seiten gehenden Sätze) irgendwann ziemlich ermüdet.
Und da eben nicht wirklich Spannung aufgebaut wird, sondern einfach erzählt wird, was so passiert, wird aus dem gemächlich Dahinplätschern bald ein sumpfiges, klebriges Waten in Worten.

Nein, danke. Das Buch hat in mir keinen Freund gefunden. Und auch wenn mich wieder einige als Banausen beschimpfen wollen ... ganz groß sind die Werke, die es vermögen, spannend, unterhaltsam und gleichzeitig anspruchsvoll, tiefgreifend und erschütternd zu sein. Das eine (Trivialliteratur) und das andere (verkopfte Elfenbeinturmliteratur) ist selten ein Genuss, der über das erste Mal lesen hinausgeht.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


0 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen nicht mit Infinite Jest (Unendlicher Spaß) vergleichen, 19. April 2010
Rezension bezieht sich auf: 2666 (Taschenbuch)
Wem an Infinite Jest der wirr anmutende, aber doch durchdachte und hintersinnige narrative Strom gefiel, könnte auch hier auf seine Kosten kommen. Für mich allerdings war 2666 eine große Enttäuschung, und das hat mit der (möglicherweise nur eingeblideten) Anbiederung des Autors an eine musische, philosophisch und literarisch interessierte Leserschaft zu tun. Genau wie Harry Potter, Twilight und Eragon kühl kalkuliert auf die Interessen ihrer Zielgruppe abgestellt sind versucht 2666 beständig sich das Wohlwollen einer elitären Leserschaft zu erkriechen. Wo D.F.Wallace mit seinem anarchischen Stil punktet und Referenzen in eine synthetische, absurde Welt zeigen, trotzdem aber mit trockenem Witz und Akribie sinnhaltig sind, da unterhält 2666 eher mit realen Referenzen und Zuweisungen, die allerdings in ihrer gestellten Gelehrigkeit nur abstossen.
Zentriert in den Geisteswissenschaften wie Schwanitz' 'Bildung', schwerfälliger als Infinite Jest und auch sonst kein Brüller : 2666 war eine leidvoller Erfahrung.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


0 von 12 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Englischsprachige Ausgabe, 14. April 2010
Von 
Rezension bezieht sich auf: 2666 (Taschenbuch)
Das bestellte Buch war vollständig in englischer Sprache verfasst. Ein Buch eines solchen Umfangs lese ich vorzugsweise in deutsch. Daher habe ich das Buch an amazon.de zurück geschickt und fand den Rücksendeservice ausgesprochen kundenfreundlich.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

2666
2666 von Roberto Bolaño (Taschenbuch - 4. Juli 2009)
EUR 9,40
Auf Lager.
In den Einkaufswagen Auf meinen Wunschzettel
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen