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29 von 30 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Brilliantly Unique Look at a Universal Problem
In J.D. Salinger's brilliant coming-of-age novel, Holden Caulfield, a seventeen year old prep school adolescent relates his lonely, life-changing twenty-four hour stay in New York City as he experiences the phoniness of the adult world while attempting to deal with the death of his younger brother, an overwhelming compulsion to lie and troubling sexual...
Am 21. Juli 2000 veröffentlicht

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3.0 von 5 Sternen The catcher in the rye - a matter of taste
I have a divided opinion about the novel "the catcher in the rye" by J.D.Salinger. On the one hand I have to admit that it gives the reader a very good insight into the world of a depressed teenager living in a world he doesn't want to accept. Holden Caulfield is a very sensitive boy and there are parts of the novel in which I can understand him very well. most...
Am 28. Mai 2001 veröffentlicht


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5.0 von 5 Sternen A Brilliantly Unique Look at a Universal Problem, 21. Juli 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Catcher in the Rye (Taschenbuch)
In J.D. Salinger's brilliant coming-of-age novel, Holden Caulfield, a seventeen year old prep school adolescent relates his lonely, life-changing twenty-four hour stay in New York City as he experiences the phoniness of the adult world while attempting to deal with the death of his younger brother, an overwhelming compulsion to lie and troubling sexual experiences.
Salinger, whose characters are among the best and most developed in all of literature has captured the eternal angst of growing into adulthood in the person of Holden Caulfield. Anyone who has reached the age of sixteen will be able to identify with this unique and yet universal character, for Holden contains bits and pieces of all of us. It is for this very reason that The Catcher in the Rye has become one of the most beloved and enduring works in world literature.
As always, Salinger's writing is so brilliant, his characters so real, that he need not employ artifice of any kind. This is a study of the complex problems haunting all adolescents as they mature into adulthood and Salinger wisely chooses to keep his narrative and prose straightforward and simple.
This is not to say that The Catcher in the Rye is a straightforward and simple book. It is anything but. In it we are privy to Salinger's genius and originality in portraying universal problems in a unique manner. The Catcher in the Rye is a book that can be loved and understood on many different levels of comprehension and each reader who experiences it will come away with a fresh view of the world in which they live.
A work of true genius, images of a catcher in the rye are abundantly apparent throughout this book.
While analyzing the city raging about him, Holden's attention is captured by a child walking in the street "singing and humming." Realizing that the child is singing the familiar refrain, "If a body meet a body, comin' through the rye," Holden, himself, says that he feels "not so depressed."
The title's words, however, are more than just a pretty ditty that Holden happens to like. In the stroke of pure genius that is Salinger, himself, he wisely sums up the book's theme in its title.
When Holden, whose past has been traumatic, to say the least, is questioned by his younger sister, Phoebe, regarding what he would like to do when he gets older, Holden replies, "Anyway, I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody's around--nobody big, I mean--except me. And I'm standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff--I mean if they're running and they don't look where they're going. I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. That's all I'd do all day. I'd just be the catcher in the rye and all. I know it's crazy, but that's the only thing I'd really like to be."
In this short bit of dialogue Salinger brilliantly exposes Holden's deepest desire and expounds the book's theme. Holden wishes to preserve something of childhood innocence that gets hopelessly lost as we grow into the crazy and phony world of adulthood.
The theme of lost innocence is deftly explored by Salinger throughout the book. Holden is appalled when he encounters profanity scrawled on the walls of Phoebe's school, a school that he envisions protecting and shielding children from the evils of society.
When Holden gives his red hunting cap to Phoebe to wear, he gives it to her as a shield, an emblem of the eternal love and protectiveness he feels for her.
Near the beginning of the book, Holden remembers a girl he once knew, Jane Gallagher, with whom he played checkers. Jane, he remembers, "wouldn't move any of her kings," and action Holden realizes to be a metaphor of her naivete. When Holden hears that his sexually experienced prep school roommate had a date with Jane, he immediately starts a fight with him, symbolically protecting Jane's innocence.
More sophisticated readers might question the reasons behind Holden's plight. While Holden's feelings are universal, this character does seem to be a rather extreme example. The catalyst for Holden's desires is no doubt the death of his younger brother, Allie, a bright and loving boy who died of leukemia at the age of thirteen. Holden still feels the sting of Allie's death acutely, as well as his own, albeit undeserved, guilt, in being able to do nothing to prevent Allie's suffering.
The only reminder Holden has of Allie's shining but all-too-short life, is Allie's baseball mitt which is covered with poems Allie read while standing in the outfield. In a particularly poignant moment, Holden tells us that this is the glove he would want to use to catch children when they fall from the cliff of innocence.
In an interesting, but trademark, Salinger twist, Holden distorts the Robert Burns poem that provides the book's title. Originally, it read, "If a body meet a body, comin' through the rye." Holden distorts the word "meet" into "catch." This is certainly not the first time Holden is guilty of distortion; indeed he is a master at it.
This distortion, however, shows us how much Allie's death has affected Holden and also how much he fears his own fall from innocence, the theme that threads its way throughout the whole of the book.
By this amazing book's end, we must reach the conclusion that there are times when we all need a "catcher in the rye." We are, indeed, blessed if we have one.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen quasi-autobiographical depiction of depression in a teenager, 16. August 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Catcher in the Rye (Taschenbuch)
I have not read all the reviews listed here, and so my comments may be redundant, but I feel that most of the customer reviewers have missed the mark. This book is a brilliant study (probably quasi-autobiographical from what I know of J.D. Salinger's life) of a teenage boy who suffers from severe depression, and barely hangs on through his odyssey from the time he leaves school until he is rescued by his younger sister. There are clear parallels between this book and The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath, except that she found nothing to anchor her to life. As he travels along, Holden tempts fate on a number of occasions, any one of which could have resulted in his death or serious injury- a vulnerable teenage boy staying in a flophouse of a hotel, engaging a prostitute and taking on her pimp, walking through Central Park after dark, and generally roaming around a usually unforgiving city. His salvation is his sister, who is the only one who can cut through his cynicism, and self-destructiveness. She is truly the "catcher in the rye," standing at the edge of the cliff, guardian and protector, keeping all the children from falling off the edge. In this case, she keeps her brother from the abyss, as he finally agrees to go home, and to not follow his fantasy to go out west, which I think is a metaphor for the great unknown, and probably his own ultimate destruction. Why he honors her so is not entirely clear, but it could be because she is truly pre-egoic; innocent, caring, displaying unconditional love and concern for Holden, and no facade that he can disparage with his cynicism and wit. The "epilogue" final chapter shows Holden acknowledging that he is in some institution, probably as a psychiatric inpatient, who is letting a psychotherapist into his world. He seems to have lost his severe cynical edge, and one gets the hint that he is going to make it, to recover from an illness which almost destroyed him. The novel leaves us on a hopeful note, although, interestingly enough, I dont get the impression that the author ever similarly extricated himself from the reclusive life which he has lived. All in all, I think that we bear witness to a brilliantly-crafted case study of adolescent depression, with all of the contrasting anguish and humorous cynicism expected in such a pathetic figure. The irony here, of course, is that the world and its inhabitants are indeed phony, and to cure Holden is to allow him to become everything he so incisively rails against. Do we do him- and any other beings who see the world for what it really is- a true service by trying to change them??
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Marc Chapman hat es nicht verstanden..., 6. November 2006
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Michael Dienstbier "Privatrezensent ohne fina... (Bochum) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Catcher in the Rye (Taschenbuch)
Als Marc Chapman 1981 John Lennon erschoss, hatte er zwei Dinge bei sich: einen Revolver und eine Ausgabe von J.D. Salingers "The Catcher in the Rye". So sehr habe er sich mit Holden Caulfield, dem Protagonisten und Erzähler des Romans, identifizieren können, so Chapman. Seitdem wurde oftmals der Roman für den Tod Lennons verantwortlich gemacht. Das ist natürlich völliger Blödsinn. "The Catcher in the Rye" ist einer der wenigen ganz großen Romane des 20. Jahrhunderts.

Der 16-jährige Holden Caulfield ist mal wieder von einem Internat geflogen. Der hoch intelligente, aber melancholische und ziellose, Teenager steht seiner Zukunft mit völliger Gleichgültigkeit gegenüber und fällt in allen Fächern, bis auf Englisch, in der Schule durch. In vier Tagen werden seine Eltern die Entscheidung per Brief mitgeteilt bekommen. Diese Zeit nutzt Holden zu einem Ausflug nach New York, so dass er genug Zeit hat über sein Leben zu grübeln und der Leser so einiges an Tragischem aus seinem Leben erfährt.

Im Verlauf des Romans schleicht er sich in die elterliche Wohnung, um seine geliebte jüngere Schwester Phoebe zu treffen. Diese fordert ihn auf, sich endlich darüber klar zu werden, was er in seinem Leben erreichen will. Holdens Antwort ist legendär und fasziniert seit Jahrzehnten Leser übe all auf der Welt:

"I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody's around - nobody big, I mean - except me. And I'm standing on the edge of some ivory cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff - I mean if they're running and they don't look where they're going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. That's all I do all day. I'd just be the catcher in the rye and all. I know it's crazy, but that's the only thing I'd really like to be. I know it's crazy" (chapter 22).

Fazit: Beeindruckender Blick in die Seele eines Teenagers. Ein Buch über das, was im Leben wirklich zählt. Schade, dass Mr. Chapman das nicht erkannt hat.
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5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen A masterpiece of American vernacular and all., 12. Februar 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Catcher in the Rye (Taschenbuch)
The first thing you'll probably want me to say is how great 'The Catcher in the Rye' is, and how it changed my life, and all that existential angst crap - but I don't feel like saying that, if you want to know the truth.

It's just a book, for chrissakes, about some lousy goddamn kid who goes to New York for a few days. If there's one thing I hate, it's phoney books. Don't even mention that Holden Caulfield guy to me. So he's a bit screwed up and all. So what? And don't start talking about the human condition, either - I'm touchy as hell about that. We've all gone through that madman stuff; I don't need some goddamn crazy author telling me how it feels. I know how it feels. I swear to God, if I ever saw that JD.Salinger I'd go right up to him and tell him what a corny book he's written. I'd really get a bang out of that.

You know, I'm the most terrific liar you ever saw. If I read a great book and somebody asks me if I liked it, I'm liable to say I hated it. It's awful.

'Catcher in the Rye' - a masterpiece of American vernacular and all
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Best book I've ever read, 25. Mai 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Catcher in the Rye (Taschenbuch)
Holden Caulfield is the most loving, caring, beautiful person I have ever come across. He criticizes the bad, hypocritic, inhuman ("phony") aspects of human nature, but is constantly falling in love with the truth and beauty that people exhibit. He's in so much pain and is so depressed, and yet he still has an overwhelming desire to save others. He is a saint. I think that anyone who has read this book and did not like it (like me, the first time I read it) must either be too immature to understand it or must be looking in all the wrong places for something that doesn't exist in Catcher in the Rye. To anyone reading it for the first time, forget everything you've ever heard about it. Just sit back, read, and analyze for yourself everything that Holden says and feels. I've found that people who are like the "phonies" that Holden criticizes are too caught up in hating Holden for his depression and confusion that they don't listen to the real messages in the novel. It is important to see Holden's profound love for humanity, as well as his pain, underneath his professed hatred. Anyway, do what you want. But I'll say that, if you're not interested in what it means to be human, you might want to consider reading something else.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen The catcher in the rye - a matter of taste, 28. Mai 2001
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Catcher in the Rye (Taschenbuch)
I have a divided opinion about the novel "the catcher in the rye" by J.D.Salinger. On the one hand I have to admit that it gives the reader a very good insight into the world of a depressed teenager living in a world he doesn't want to accept. Holden Caulfield is a very sensitive boy and there are parts of the novel in which I can understand him very well. most of these parts are at the beginning of the novel. On the other hand I didn't like the book too much, because after I read half of it I started to hate Holden Caulfiel and as he is the main character, this was a real problem. I regard Holden as very naive: He judges almost everybody in his environment by calling them "phony". For him this is the most negative quality a person can have, but he also behaves phony in so many situations.Furthermore Holden is such a pessimist that I could hardly bear it. And because Holden always repeats himself the novel was a bit boring in some parts. Summing up I can say that "the catcher in the rye" is probably a book that one should have read to be able to have a say in a discussion about it. And maybe with this novel it is like with very depressing songs:It depends on your own mood whether you like it.If the reader is in a good mood while reading it, Holden's emotions seem to be so far away that it is not very interesting to read on.That's how I experienced it.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Holden Caulfield was not a bad boy and this is a great book!, 29. Juni 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Catcher in the Rye (Taschenbuch)
I have got quite a big personal library during the years. At some stage I bought both The Catcher in the Rye and Franny and Zooey by J.D. Salinger, but never got around to read them. Finally on a trip to Europe a couple of months ago, stopping in New York on the way, I packed The Catcher in the Rye in my luggage. As it is set in New York I started reading it on the plane from New York to London. And did I enjoy it?! Man, what have I been thinking, waiting so long? I got so much on terms with Holden Caulfield, that I started to write like him in a couple of letters I wrote. The evening I arrived in London there was a brilliant documentary about J.D. Salinger on TV. I was totally absorbed, and enjoyed every page of the book, admired Salinger's portrayal of adolescence. Such a comic and touching novel. I continued to read it on the train up north through Sweden and at some stage laughed so much I had to put the book down - people were looking strangely at me. They just fitted into the book, had probably never read it. I have and I loved every bit of it. Not to be missed, so don't wait, just go ahead and read it!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A terrific read, 17. August 2005
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Catcher in the Rye (Taschenbuch)
Of all the Salinger's stories, the one I enjoyed most is The Catcher in the Rye. What I consider the greatest accomplishment of this book is the fact it surpasses others in demonstrating the full depth of a character in the name of Holden and virtually transcends fiction. Holden is a character we can relate to in all his strengths and weaknesses .The contradiction and paradox of the story is brilliant. I also liked Salinger's Nine Stories. The usurper and Other stories, To Kill a Mocking Bird, The Moujik , all feature among the reads I enjoyed this summer.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Enter Holden, 13. Mai 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Catcher in the Rye (Taschenbuch)
The Catcher in the Rye is undoubtedly one of the best books that I have ever read, and just in case if you are wondering, yes I am a teenager. It seems to me that the only audience that truly appreciates this magnificent piece is the high school kid. My reasoning behind this is because the story is basically an account of a teenage guy's eventful and emotional life - rather four days of it. The content of these four days in New York more than makes up for rather short time span of the novel. Holden Vitamin Caulfield, as he likes to call himself, is constantly being bombarded with psycological pressures. His overwhelming concern revolves around the existence of "phonies" as he so calls them, who limit the ideas of the adolescent and try to get in the way of Holden's voyage to another realm, free of corruption and media. Holden searches for a world devoid of the limits of his adolescent years. Holden never really does encounter any physical dangers in his journey to find himself, instead he feels threatened by the majority and contemporary mass cluture, which promote the loss of individuality, ancient accepted values, and intellectual awareness. A plot summary of The Catcher is a very tedious task indeed. The strucure of it could be associated with a patient's recollection of past events to psychiatrist. Even so, the actual plot is not the most important thing about this book. What is important are the characters and their philosophies. Many adults may criticize Holden and his rough language, but us teenagers wolud just flock to Holden if he were an actual person. Holden also carries with him his trusty red hunting hat, a symbol of his protection and sense of self. Holden also makes several remarks about the ducks on the lagoon of Central Park South. He wonders where they go when winter comes along. One can think of this as a VERY extended metaphor comparing Holden himself looking for a new place to settle to the ducks of Central Park. My recommendation is that if you are a teenager who has a touch on reality and would just love to hear other accounts and insights on life from a similar perspective, then this book is a MUST for you! If you are a little older perhaps and you think that all this is nonsense, then this novel is even more of a MUST for you. It is a must for anybody! Still, I honestlythink that my fellow teenagers will get more of a kick out of this book. Even my very own English teacher remarked that Catcher made more of an impact the first time she read it, of course when she was a female Holden, herself, a normal teenager just looking for complete ecstacy, including love, friends, and true family. Salinger also presents Holden's tale through very delicate symbols, including his hat, the rain, and even suitcases. Its better and more fulfilling for you to see these for yourself. Also, be prepared for constant exaggeration, complete oxymorons, and swearing because after all, this is a true representation of the maturing youth. If one is so superficial to simply not read this because of the choice of words, then i pity him, for he has completely missed the point that Salinger was trying to make, and he has missed out on truly one of the best books ever to be written.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen A pointless, but descriptive book to read, 3. Februar 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Catcher in the Rye (Taschenbuch)
The Catcher in the Rye By Lynn C (A/B)
Showing a lonesomelife of a teen boy, the age of sixteen, by the name of HoldenCaulfield, the author J.D. Salinger writes a novel of Holden¡¯s life in the book called The Catcher in the Rye. The novel is fiction with a form of the first person view. The style of this book is very descriptive in fact. The basic outline of the story is about the freedom the main character, Holden Caulfield, wants, and how he wants to be someone who has meaning. Holden has basically been expelled from many schools. And yet, he is staying at Pencey (school). Well, Holden tries to stay tight in Pencey, but it seems like he cannot stand his life in the dormitory. Eventually, he sneaks out of Pencey after having a fist fight with his roommate, a few days before the vacation, and hangs around on the streets of New York, while visiting his loving sister Pheobe and friends from time to time. And basically everything else in between the main parts, are just very deep descriptions of his memories. Through the story, you will find many problems with Holden and his friends having fist fights, and problems within the society and Holden, where Holden hangs out in night clubs looking for girls to hang around with, and places such as the hotel room he stays in. There are a tremendous number of conflicts in the book, which makes it interesting to read. If you look at the book and think back of the story, you do not really feel that it has any point to it. You would start to wonder why Holden ever even went to a dormitory if he didn¡¯t like it. I mean, all the book talks about is Holden¡¯s pathetic life, and what he goes through at every place. I am sure the book was a story, but I did not find any point in the book. There wasn¡¯t a direct thought of what the book was about after I had finished the book. Even though the format of the story was not quite what I thought, I still think that the book was put a lot of thinking in it. Out all the books I have read in my life, this book is quite different in a way. One of the books I read before was called Death Be Not Proud by John Gunther, which was about a little boy who had cancer and died, it was a quite depressing biography of a little boy. The reason I am comparing it the with The Catcher in the Rye is because, it only describes basic thoughts in a regular way, but The Catcher in the Rye takes every event and deeply describes every bit of it. Not only that but also some subjects the main character, Holden Caulfield, talks about leads to other things in his life that relates to it. So, it is like branches on a tree, one leading to another. I found that confusing for me, because while I was reading the book, I did not know what to focus on, so that I can comprehend. On the other hand, I slightly did find it interesting for me to read in a way. While I was reading through, I seemed to have enjoyed the deep descriptions of Holden¡¯s life, but one thing I seriously did not really enjoy reading in every other sentence, were the curse words the author slipped in. Every other sentence of this book had curse words slipped in to them. I found that part inappropriate for young readers to read. Over all, I think the author put a load of thought into every paragraph of the book, but I don¡¯t think he mainly focused on the format of the book. Because, if you read through the book, you seem to enjoy it with much interest since it is really descriptive, but once you finish it, you ask yourself, what was the point? I mean, the plot and setting was all great, but what about the ending? The Catcher in the Rye does not seem to leave a memorable thought to the reader. If the author would have put a little more effort on the basic format of the story with reasoning, I think the book would have been one of my favorite books. It seems like the author enjoyed describing every thought of the book with much effort and time. I recommend The Catcher in the Rye to high school students with a book rating of eight out of ten.
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The Catcher in the Rye
The Catcher in the Rye von J.D. Salinger (Taschenbuch - 1. Mai 1991)
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