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4.0 von 5 Sternen Must-read for historians and people who like to read about WW II
`Operation Paperclip' written by Annie Jacobsen tells a story about a controversial subject - the secret intelligence program responsible for transfer, providing asylum and forgiveness to the German scientists after World War II to US.

Annie Jacobsen work is well-researched and offers story rich in details that explain how this operation was carefully planned,...
Vor 7 Monaten von Denis Vukosav veröffentlicht

versus
3.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting, but sometimes sloppily researched
This is a book which picks up a part of history that is interesting and deserves more publicity.

You can tell, though, that the book is written by a journalist, not a historian. Firstly, it
is more a collection of anecdotes about individuals than a comprehensive account. I
would have liked to get the global picture as well. A table with how many...
Vor 28 Tagen von F. Muller-Plathe veröffentlicht


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4.0 von 5 Sternen Must-read for historians and people who like to read about WW II, 27. Dezember 2014
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: Operation Paperclip: The Secret Intelligence Program that Brought Nazi Scientists to America (Taschenbuch)
`Operation Paperclip' written by Annie Jacobsen tells a story about a controversial subject - the secret intelligence program responsible for transfer, providing asylum and forgiveness to the German scientists after World War II to US.

Annie Jacobsen work is well-researched and offers story rich in details that explain how this operation was carefully planned, though hidden from the public and conducted after the war conflicts were ended.

The author went through German archive and Harvard University documents, but also acquired numerous documents due to the Freedom of Information Act; Jacobsen additionally conducted numerous interviews with family members of those involved in this top-secret operation, their friends and colleagues and people who interrogated captured Germans. The result is in-depth post-war life presentation of ten major German scientists who replaced their work for the Third Reich with the work for one of the two conflicting forces of the Cold War.

Annie Jacobsen split her book into five chapters, each of them dealing with a particular period of time while this operation was in progress, that make her book so far the best work on this subject previously known, but never so well treated - an amazing and complex story about one of the biggest and some would say most shameful secrets and post WW II time.

At the beginning of the book, the author asks the interest question - ...all of the men profiled in this book are now dead. Enterprising achievers as they were, just as the majority of them won top military and science awards when they served the Third Reich, so it went that many of them won top US military and civilian awards serving the United States. One had a US government building named after him, and, as of 2013, two continue to have prestigious national sciences prizes given annually in their names. One invented the ear thermometer. Others helped man get to the Moon. How did this happen, and what does this mean now?"

And in this sense Annie Jacobsen book attempts to provide answers, occasionally entering the slippery field of politics, but primarily writing about this subject from an independent perspective, using distinctive journalistic style.

Therefore `Operation Paperclip' is a must-read for historians and people who like to read about WW II, a well-made work that besides providing lot of unknown and interesting information based on extensive research Annie Jacobsen did, is also saying much about the people and the time in which these events occurred.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting, but sometimes sloppily researched, 30. Juni 2015
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Operation Paperclip: The Secret Intelligence Program that Brought Nazi Scientists to America (Taschenbuch)
This is a book which picks up a part of history that is interesting and deserves more publicity.

You can tell, though, that the book is written by a journalist, not a historian. Firstly, it
is more a collection of anecdotes about individuals than a comprehensive account. I
would have liked to get the global picture as well. A table with how many scientists of which
specialties going from which German institution to which US institution would be a starting
point, for example. Or maps?

Secondly: I am German and I have noticed many small errors when our side of the Atlantic Ocean
is described. To name but two out of many: (i) the university of Vienna is not the oldest in the German-speaking
world; Prague was earlier, and it was German-speaking at the time. This mistake seems to have been
faithfully copied from the English Wikipedia (the German Wikipedia is correct). (ii) The Raubkammer
site is not located 75 miles west of Hanover at Münster-Nord, but about 50 miles straight to the north
near Munster (no umlaut!) in a region called Lüneburger Heide. The author also failed to notice the continuity
of chemical weapons research at this site: In the immediate neighbourhood is the Gasplatz Breloh,
where much of the chemical-weapons testing of the first world war had been carried out.

Such inaccuracies may be unimportant and inconsequential for the thrust of the book. But the
number of them makes me wonder whether there are also more important errors in other
parts, which I am not able to check.

I hope this book opens the door to more in-depth historical research on the subject. The
issue deserves it!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Disturbing implications about the quality of American universities, 12. April 2014
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Operation Paperclip: The Secret Intelligence Program that Brought Nazi Scientists to America (Taschenbuch)
What no reviewer seems to have pointed out is the apparent superiority of German universities such as those at Goettingen and Tuebingen, whose scientific graduates, while no more intelligent than their U.S. or British counterparts, were light-years ahead in military applications of physics and chemistry. No other country's scientists were capable of producing the V-2 rockets or -- Sputnik's German creators not excepted -- satellites. German exchange students in our high schools regularly report that they aren't being taught anything that they haven't already learned. John J. McCloy's view that it was preferable to employ even virulently anti-Semitic Nazi scientists in our military-industrial complex rather than allow the Soviets to reap the advantages of their contributions is arguably cogent.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen TOP, 24. April 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Operation Paperclip: The Secret Intelligence Program that Brought Nazi Scientists to America (Taschenbuch)
Bin zwar erst bei Seite 200, liest sich aber bisher sehr flüssig und ist äußerst interessant. Vom Stil her mehr in Richtung Journalismus denn Sachbuch.
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