Fashion Sale Hier klicken indie-bücher Cloud Drive Photos Erste Wahl Learn More sommer2016 designshop Hier klicken Fire Shop Kindle PrimeMusic Autorip NYNY

Kundenrezensionen

4,2 von 5 Sternen42
4,2 von 5 Sternen
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe|Ändern
Preis:15,95 €+ Kostenfreie Lieferung mit Amazon Prime
Ihre Bewertung(Löschen)Ihre Bewertung


Derzeit tritt ein Problem beim Filtern der Rezensionen auf. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.

am 8. September 2012
The central thesis of the book is quite simple: Prosperity is achieved when economical institutions are inclusive (allowing all citizens to participate and compete in markets under fair conditions) These inclusive economic institutions require inclusive political institutions, which allow different groups to participate in the political decision-making process. If that is not the case, if small elites are allowed to dominate politics, then they will manipulate economic institutions to their own benefit, extracting wealth from the other groups. Hence the labelling of these institutions as extractive. This thesis is elaborated on the 460 pages of the book, and the historical pathways of different societies leading to either inclusive or extractive institutions are analyzed.
Examples acrually range from England to Kongo, from Australia to Argentina, from the old Maya Civilisation to modern day China. It is a dizzying array of examples, and occasionally one has the feeling that the historical events described in the book must have been more complex Therefore occasionally I have wondered whether these events really fit so perfectly into the line of arguments, which the authors have developed.
And while they describe quite well what they understand as inclusive economic institutions (property rights, market access, 'level playing field' etc.) the definition of inclusive institutions remains a bit hazy. It's not democracy, but 'pluralism', 19th century Japan qualifies, Argentina does not.
ButI found it a very interesting and thought-provoking book, which I wholeheartedly recommend. As somebody who is working in the field of development I find it lamentable that development orthodoxy since the Eighties is completely dominated by economic prescriptions (which hardly have worked). The rediscovering of politics and policies (and institutions) as an important precondition for growth and development was long overdue. And even if reality is too complexe to be fully covered even on 460 pages, this book certainly provides a good starting point.
0Kommentar|11 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 12. September 2012
Ein mutiger neuer erklarungsansatz für missglückte Staaten, der gründlich mit den bisherigen Determinanten Religion, Kultur, Wetter oder Klima aufräumt und deutlich macht, dass Institutionen über wohl und wehe des Wohlstands entscheiden. Inklusive, d. H. Offene politische Systeme mit klaren geistigen und materiellen Eigentumsrechten sorgen für "inklusive" und damit wohlstandssteigernde wirtschaftliche Rahmenbedingungen.

Kultur als Determinante - widerlegt durch Korea und eine mexikanisch amerikanische doppelstadt und ihre jeweiligen leistungsunterschiede. Religion, protestantische Ethik? Auch Singapur ist ohne Protestantismus aufgestiegen, Südkorea, Taiwan ebenso. Der allen scheiternden Staaten gemeinsame Nenner ist die "extraktive" Wirtschaftsordnung, der Verzicht auf anreize für die Leistungen der eigenen arbeit. Was sich wie der empirische Beweis der Richtigkeit der Thesen Francis fukuyamas liest, trägt die Warnung in sich, dass auch die liberale Demokratie am Ende der Geschichte "Extraktive", leistungshemmende und wohlstandsmindernde systemische Ansätze bilden kann.

Mit Sicherheit ist den Autoren mit dem Begriffspaar extraktiv/inklusive ein großer Wurf gelungen, der deutlich mehr trennscharfe aufweist als bisherige unabhängige Variablen - nur ganz neutralisieren lassen sich kulturelle und religiöse Einflüsse nicht, da sie auf die ordnenden Institutionen rückkoppeln.
11 Kommentar|19 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 6. Mai 2012
The book by Acemoglu and Robinson is inspiring, eye- and mind opening, especially for those not yet familiar with the idea of institutions structuring human societies and development. The book is very rich of historical examples underlining the theory of extractive and inclusive institutions, leading to either prosperity or failure of nations. After reading the book, which is recommended, one sees the world in a different way and one becomes aware of extractive institutions nearly everywhere: Bangladeshi workers in the garment factories, the domestic workers, the agricultural laborers, children working for little or no wages, generally poverty and environmental destruction ' all are the result of extractive institutions.
The problem is that the institutional theory is rather broad and every example provided by the authors can also be explained entirely by extractive institutions only ' also the success of the developed and democratic nations. Another problem is that the authors cannot draw a clear line between extractive institutions and inclusive institutions. But that is not so much a problem created by the authors as it lies in the nature of institutions: Every type of institution always includes some and excludes others because institutions are specific with regards to whom the apply. What is also outstanding is the neglect to reflect on the institutions in place in the USA and other developed nations, which may have the most extractive institutions of all nations today.
Let us set up a counter-hypothesis: only extractive institutions are at play and explain economic growth ' on different levels of society, by different actors, and by different numbers of actors with more or less privileges and power. The smaller the group of actors benefiting from effective extractive institutions and the greater the inequality between the rents they extract and those of the rest of society, the less likely it is that they can keep the extractive institutions in place for long. Depending on the extent of political power they have, of course. At some point redistribution of wealth from extraction will occur, either peacefully or violently.
Not only a minority of elites in developing countries set up and benefit extractive institutions. Also a majority population or entire nations can benefit from extractive institutions, for example by dictating the terms of international trade and subsidizing their agricultural sectors. America is operating under extractive institutions despite its democratic political system ' or maybe because of the opportunities it creates for economically powerful elites intertwined with the political elites. Rightly the authors point to the fact that political and economic markets interplay. A look at the situation in America shows that the less economically empowered are basically politically disempowered. Those are for example the farmers forced to grow seeds provided by multinational companies or the lower income population (economically) forced to buy and eat cheap and unhealthy food produced with subsidized maize and soybeans ' just those crops which are protected by patents held by the same multinationals. The food industry in America which has spread far across its borders, is an example of extractive institutions at play par excellence.
So its not enough to set up these two categories of extractive and inclusive institutions with only one measure of success: economic growth and prosperity. Just like you need to look at the multidimensionality of poverty in order to understand it better, you need to look at the entire quality of life and that of the natural environment, which is the ultimate basis for life. Rising income inequality, decreasing happiness and degrading natural environments are indicators of extractive institutions at play also in the developed world. Maybe it is just not as visible for those residing within the nations benefiting from extraction.
Both, the developed and developing nations are operating under extractive institutions. It is just more obvious when seeing poverty on the streets of Dhaka or Delhi or unimaginable riches of dictators in Africa or Russia. Who is to judge how much is enough? These are the more pressing question of today: How many people need to benefit from extraction before extractive institutions become inclusive and how extractive can we be before the earth's life support systems collapse?
0Kommentar|19 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 20. März 2013
The key insight of "Why nations fail" is: Good political (i.e. inclusive and participatory institutions) and correspondingly good economic systems enter into a symbiotic relationship, resulting in progress, increasing wealth and more equitable societies. Bad (i.e. exploitative and extractive) institutions do not. Good and bad institution enter their respective virtuous or vicious circles so if you're poor you're likely to stay poor and disenfranchised unless something fundmental can be made to change.

I admire the authors' erudition and scope of learning. Examples from ancient Mayas and Rome, 17th century Britain and Congo, post-bellum U.S. South, modern-day South Africa, Sierra Leone or Ethiopia are given to support the central argument of the book. But as much as I enjoyed the various "histories" my feeling after about page 50 was: Yes ok, I got the point. "Why nations fail" seems to me in essence an essay built up into a longish book. Yet: I probably wouldn't have read an article in a scientific journal whereas I read this book and am certainly neither the poorer not the dumber for it.
0Kommentar|3 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 12. Dezember 2012
"It's not the economy, stupid, it's politics" lautet sinngemäß die Antwort von Acemoglu & Robinson auf den bekannten und vielzitierten Wahlkampschlager von Bill Clinton. Das Fazit der Autoren gleich vorweg: Nationen versagen ökonomisch und gesellschaftlich, weil sie über ausbeuterische ("extraktive") statt offen-demokratische ("inklusive") politische Institutionen verfügen. Korrupte Staaten bzw. die jeweilige herrschende Kaste lähmen Innovationen und Unternehmergeist und bereichern sich auf dreistetste Weise an dem wenigen volkswirtschaftlichen Vermögen, welches in derartigen "failing states" erwirtschaftet wird. Belege hierfür aus der Geschichte liefern die Autoren zuhauf. Erschreckend, dass sich derartig eingeschlagene Pfade noch heute, teilweise Jahrhunderte später auswirken.

Ein interessantes Beispiel ist dabei der Vergleich zwischen Nogales, Mexiko und Nogales, Arizona. Auf der einen Seite der Grenze, im US-Amerikanischen Norden der Stadt gibt es seit dem ausgehenden 18. Jahrhundert einen funktioniernden Staat mit liberaler Verfassung und garantierten Eigentumsrechten, die nach dem Prinzip der Egalität grundsätzlich jedem offen stehen, der bereit ist sich unternehmerisch in der Privatwirtschaft zu engagieren. Das setzt die richtigen Anreize für individuelle Leistungsbereitschaft, für harte Arbeit, deren Früchte weitestgehend dem Einzelnen zugebilligt werden, der sie erwirtschaftet hat. Der amerikanische "pursuit of happiness" ist der eigentliche Motor wirtschaftlichen Erfolgs und dort wo er am wenigstens durch staatliche Intervention gestört wird, ist er am erfolgreichsten. Er lässt dem Einzelnen Freiraum, sich selbst zu entfalten und "seines eigenen Glückes Schmied" zu sein. Gleichzeitig werden fundamentale demokratische Rechte in der Verfassung garantiert sowie staatliche Macht durch ausgefeilte "checks and balances" politisch gezügelt. Das Resultat sind stabile demokratisce Verhältnisse, innerhalb derer sich die Wirtschaft entfalten kann. Das Wesen der Demokratie in Amerika (Toqueville) bietet den Garant für eine offene und stabile Gesellschaftsordnung. Völlig anders das Bild auf der anderen Seite der Grenze. Dort leben ebenfalls Bürger von Nogales, die denselben Boden und dasselbe Wetter vorfinden und z.T. denselben Familien entstammen. Nur geht es ihnen auf dieser Seite der Grenze nicht einmal halbwegs so gut, wie ihren amerikanischen Brüdern und Schwestern. Mexiko hat sich im Vergleich zu den USA von der ausbeuterischen Kolonialherrschaft der Spanier nie erholt. Statt einer demokratischen Verfassung gab es Revolutionen. Die Regierungen gaben sich die Klinke in die Hand und Stabilität und Fortschritt konnten sich zu keinem Zeitpunkt in der Genetik der Mexikaner festsetzen. Es gibt dort keine kreative Zerstörung (Schumpeter), keine Innovationen und keinen technologischen Fortschritt, weil es keinen funktionierenden Wettbewerb gibt, der vom Staat geschützt werden würde (oder kennen Sie etwa außer Chili und Tacos ein Produkt von Bedeutung aus Mexiko?). In Amerika geht der Staat gegen Monopole wie Microsoft mit rechtsstaatlichen Mitteln vor. In Mexiko gibt es Monopolisten wie Carlos Slim (den derzeit reichsten Menschen der Erde), die durch gezieltes Lobbying den Staat als Verbündeten auf ihre Seite gezogen haben. Ähnliches sehen wir in Indien (siehe Lakshmi Mital).

Auch wir Deutschen kennen ein Beispiel einer geschlossenen Gesellschaft. Die DDR war geradezu ein Musterbeispiel für einen ausbeuterischen, undemokratischen, extraktiven Staat, in dem kein Wettbewerb herrschte und folglich Innovationen und Fortschritt nie zu Stande kamen. Ein noch extremeres Beispiel sind Nord- und Südkorea.

Von all diesen (Schwester-) Ländern kann man nicht gerade behaupten, dass die Menschen hier auf unterschiedliche geografische Gegebenheiten Rücksicht zu nehmen hätten oder von einer grundsätzlich anderen Kultur geprägt wären. Es sind vielmehr die staatlichen Institutionen, die darüber bestimmen, ob es mit einem Land aufwärts geht oder mit mehr oder weniger großen Schritten Richtung Abstieg und Zerfall.

Man mag sich dann natürlich fragen, warum die Sowjetunion bis weit in die 80er Jahre hinein derart atemberaubende Wachstumszahlen präsentieren konnte. Denn zweifelsohne handelte es sich bei den Genossinnen und Genossen hinter dem eiserenen Vorhang um eine geschlossene Gesellschaft, in der Parteikader, Funktionäre und Aktivisten gut leben, der Rest des Volkes jedoch darben musste. Acemoglu & Robinson können auch diesen Effekt erklären. Während zentralistische Staaten, deren Wirtschaft durch Befehl und Zwang statt durch ein Preissystem des Marktes gekennzeichnet sind, bestimmte Branchen sehr effektiv zu einem höheren Output an Produkten und Dienstleistungen dirigieren können, werden an anderer Stelle kaum sinnvolle Anreize für eigenverantwortliches Handeln und damit nachhaltiges Wachstum gesetzt. Über kurz oder lang kommt es zu keinem nennenswerten Fortschritt mehr und Innovationen ziehen sich, wenn überhaupt, über Jahre hin (der "Trabbi" lässt grüßen). Am Ende steht der rapide wirtschaftliche Niedergang und die Auflösung, die allenfalls durch militärische Gewalt verhindert werden kann (wie in Nordkorea durch eine de facto Militärdiktatur).

Ziehen wir also Bilanz: Staaten versagen, wenn sie die "falschen" politischen Institutionen gegen das Wohl der Bevölkerung durchzusetzen versuchen. Das mag einige Zeit funktionieren, führt jedoch im Ergebnis zu einer Ausbeutung der Mehrheit durch wenige Kader und Monopolisten, die das staatliche System fest in ihrem Griff haben. Der Rest hat keinen Anreiz produktiv zu sein und so bleiben fast zwangsläufig Innovationen aus und es droht der allmähliche Zerfall.

Die These von Acemoglu & Robinson mag schlicht sein, doch ist sie mittlerweile in Vergessenheit geraten. Erschreckend, dass heutzutage die Ansicht vorherrscht, der Kapitalismus englischer Prägung sei an sämtlichen Miseren Schuld. Hier wird tatsächlich Ursache mit Wirkung verwechselt. Seit dem großen Wirtschaftethiker Adam Smith wissen wir: ein starkes Gemeinwesen braucht die "unsichtbare Hand" des Marktes sowie Chancengleichheit um zu gedeihen und zu wachsen. Mit Befehl und Zwang werden demgegenüber die falschen Anreize gesetzt und einige wenige bereichern sich auf Kosten der Mehrheit. Lernen wir aus unserer eigenen Geschichte, statt auf den derzeitigen politischen Mainstream zu vertrauen. Die Lektüre dieses Buches ist ein erster Schritt in die richtige Richtung.
0Kommentar|2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 19. August 2012
In diesem Buch geht es darum, wie die politische Ausrichtung eines Landes dessen wirtschaftlichen Erfolg bestimmt (und umgekehrt). Es gibt zwei Leitmotive:

BETEILIGUNG: In einer Demokratie hat jeder politische Rechte und in einer Marktwirtschaft gibt es keine Privilegien. Gewinner und Verlierer im politischen und wirtschaftlichen Bereich stehen nicht langfristig fest; Wandel ist möglich. Damit Wandel möglich ist, muss der Staat für Eigentumsrechte, Wettbewerb, Bildung, Sicherheit und Infrastruktur sorgen.

AUSBEUTUNG: Hier dient der Staat nur dazu, der herrschenden Elite zu Wohlstand zu verhelfen. Deshalb ist der wirtschaftliche Bereich durch Korruption, Privilegien und Monopole gekennzeichnet. Wandel ist nur durch eine (gewaltsame) Revolution möglich. Aber auch das nützt meist nur wenigen, weil in der Regel nur der Ausbeuter ausgetauscht wird.

Warum gibt es dann Staaten, die ihre Bevölkerung in Armut halten? Weil dies den herrschenden Eliten nützt.

Frühere Erklärungen für Armut und Reichtum der Nationen (Geographie, Wetter, Bodenschätze, Kultur) gelten zumindest in der modernen Welt nicht mehr. Heute bestimmt die Politik, wie die Wirtschaft funktioniert. Dabei werden oft bestehende Verhältnisse (z. B. aus der Kolonialzeit) einfach übernommen, was die Armut endemisch macht.

Positive Beispiele sind die westlichen Industriestaaten; negative Beispiele findet man in Afrika und Lateinamerika. Ausbeuterische Systeme können kurzfristig Wirtschaftswachstum bringen; langfristig sind nur Marktwirtschaften erfolgreich. Entwicklungshilfe hilft nur den herrschenden Eliten und verbessert den allgemeinen Lebensstandard nicht.

***

Mir hat das Buch teilweise gut gefallen.

Es gibt viele historische Beispiele, Zeichnungen und Abbildungen. Es wird klar, dass die Geschichte eine wichtige Rolle spielt und dass Sklaverei und Kolonialismus einen negativen Einfluss auf Afrika und Asien hatten. Die Methodik ist jedoch auch das Problem, weil die Argumentation eben auf diesen Anekdoten beruht und eine wissenschaftliche Begründung nicht geliefert wird (man wird auf Studien verwiesen).

Darüber hinaus ist das Ganze nicht neu. Schon Adam Smith hat darauf hingewiesen, dass ein guter Staat einfach Recht und Ordnung, gutes Geld und niedrige Steuern bedeutet. Die Österreichische Schule der Volkswirtschaftslehre hat auch immer auf die Bedeutung der internationalen Arbeitsteilung hingewiesen. Damit war längst klar, dass Monopole. Korruption, Sozialismus und Protektionismus Armut bedeuten.

Die negativen Seiten der Demokratie (Tyrannei der Mehrheit) und der politischen Zentralisierung werden vernachlässigt.

Das Buch ist aber ein guter Einstieg in das Thema.
0Kommentar|14 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 30. Mai 2016
This book shows an interesting (though not quite new) approach to why some nations are succesful and others are not. There are many exciting examples and observations of different countries and cultures but in the end it all leads to the same insight: the theory of inclusive politics is the only reasonable and right explanation. In addition to that the book lacks a good structure in my opinion. Would recommend it nonetheless!
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 22. Dezember 2015
Acemoglu & Robinson set out on the mission to explain the diversity in income levels on global scale, responding to various well-known explanatory approaches, e.g. the culture hypothesis and the geography hypothesis.

Although their critique and counter-arguments against the culture and geography hypotheses is not fully convincing and remains, also due to the shortness with which they present their counter-arguments, a point of debate, their book does not suffer from this minor deficiency.

While their book hammers home their major message of the crucial role institutions play in explaining nowadays' disparity in living standards, I found their presentation of their major theoretical concepts (e.g. extractive and inclusive institutions) a little too brief. Thus, while reading, I ended up several times wondering how exactly they pin down (with regards to clear definitions and indicators) when institutions are extractive and when they are inclusive.

Also, I found the structure of the book at times arbitrary, having difficulties to make out the argumentative path they are leading down the reader. This, however, accounts only for the grand structure, that is, comparing chapter to chapter. In contrast, the single chapters themselves are well-structured, featuring an interesting case-introduction, moving on to generalized arguments and ending in a brief wrap-up with a hint on what's coming next.

Therefore, I recommend the book to all interested in finding an explanation of why there is so much variance in living standards across the globe today, and of why many countries of this world simply do not develop economically as quickly as they, in theory, could.

While the book wraps up much of the new-instituionalist research of Acemoglu, Johnson, & Robinson, it is clearly written with people who are not professionally engaged in social science, or who do not study social science, in mind. It is, thus, easily comprehensible and, with lots of interesting case examples of follies with which 'bad' institutions come along, very entertaining, too.

As with regards to people who deal with questions of economic and societal development professionally or as students, it is a must- and worth-to-read book.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 16. Mai 2015
Das Buch sollte man am besten zusammen lesen mit "Price of Inequality" von Stiglitz. In diesem Buch werden 2 Muster bechrieben "inklusiv" und extraktiv", die die Autoren mit dem Erfolg von Staaten korellieren: Wobei Sie den Erfolg als Wohlergehen für die gesamte Bevölkerung beschreiben.
Über mehr als 600 Jahre zeigen Sie in der Geschichte, welche Folgen gewaltsame oder auch sonst Ausbeutung der großen Mehrheit durch eine kleine Minderheit für das Wohlergehen aller und das Wirtschaftswachstum hat. Und an dieser Stelle ist es gut, vorher Stiglitz gelesen zu haben. Der zeigt für die USA, wie diese auf dem Weg zu einer extraktiven Gesellschaft sind, bei der das, was Stiglitz "1%" nennt die große Mehrheit der Bevölkerung in Armut treibt und über die Zeit immer mehr von einem würdigen Leben ausschließt. Danach sind auch die USA an einem der in diesem Bucht beschriebenen Wendepunkte.
Man kann dann dazu noch zwei weitere Bücher lesen, die das ganze gut ergänzen: "Our Kids" von Robert Putnam und "The Second Machine Age" - in "Our Kids" wird gezeigt, weilche extrem negativen Folgen zu große Ungleichkeit und nicht mehr vorhande soziale Mobilität für die Gesellschaft der USA hat (Deutschland ist diesbezüglich nicht erforscht, aber mit Sicherheit nur graduell besser). Und in "The Second Machine Ahe" wird eine der Ursachen für Beschäftigungsrückgang und Druck auf die Einkommen der 99% beschrieben: Die voranschreitende Digitalisierung.
Wenn man das alles gelesen hat, möchte man die 4 Bücher den Abgeordneten unserer großen Parteien in Form einer Druckbetankung angedeihen lassen und ihnen sagen: Es kann nicht sein, dass ihr Euch vor den Karren einer "aufziehenden extraktiven Gesellschaft" der 0,1% spannen lasst. Wacht bitte auf und geht einen Weg der "Inklusion", der sozialen Aufwärtemobilität, von mehr Gelichheit und von öffentlicher Daseinsvorsorge.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 16. Mai 2015
Das Buch sollte man am besten zusammen lesen mit "Price of Inequality" von Stiglitz. In diesem Buch werden 2 Muster bechrieben "inklusiv" und extraktiv", die die Autoren mit dem Erfolg von Staaten korellieren: Wobei Sie den Erfolg als Wohlergehen für die gesamte Bevölkerung beschreiben.
Über mehr als 600 Jahre zeigen Sie in der Geschichte, welche Folgen gewaltsame oder auch sonst Ausbeutung der großen Mehrheit durch eine kleine Minderheit für das Wohlergehen aller und das Wirtschaftswachstum hat. Und an dieser Stelle ist es gut, vorher Stiglitz gelesen zu haben. Der zeigt für die USA, wie diese auf dem Weg zu einer extraktiven Gesellschaft sind, bei der das, was Stiglitz "1%" nennt die große Mehrheit der Bevölkerung in Armut treibt und über die Zeit immer mehr von einem würdigen Leben ausschließt. Danach sind auch die USA an einem der in diesem Bucht beschriebenen Wendepunkte.
Man kann dann dazu noch zwei weitere Bücher lesen, die das ganze gut ergänzen: "Our Kids" von Robert Putnam und "The Second Machine Age" - in "Our Kids" wird gezeigt, weilche extrem negativen Folgen zu große Ungleichkeit und nicht mehr vorhande soziale Mobilität für die Gesellschaft der USA hat (Deutschland ist diesbezüglich nicht erforscht, aber mit Sicherheit nur graduell besser). Und in "The Second Machine Ahe" wird eine der Ursachen für Beschäftigungsrückgang und Druck auf die Einkommen der 99% beschrieben: Die voranschreitende Digitalisierung.
Wenn man das alles gelesen hat, möchte man die 4 Bücher den Abgeordneten unserer großen Parteien in Form einer Druckbetankung angedeihen lassen und ihnen sagen: Es kann nicht sein, dass ihr Euch vor den Karren einer "aufziehenden extraktiven Gesellschaft" der 0,1% spannen lasst. Wacht bitte auf und geht einen Weg der "Inklusion", der sozialen Aufwärtemobilität, von mehr Gelichheit und von öffentlicher Daseinsvorsorge.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden