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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Develop Reliable Software Rapidly and Enjoyably
In this short and delightful book, Beck presents the underpinnings of the discipline of software development called "Extreme Programming", or XP. He tells us why the discipline works and the basics of how to do it. (More books are forthcoming, but start here.)
The book addresses lightweight approaches to customer communication, architecture, design,...
Veröffentlicht am 29. Oktober 1999 von Ronald E Jeffries

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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen XP = the Psuedo Revolution
The claim, in one of the reviews here, that this book is going to rank w/the Gang of 4 book is patently absurd. This book attempts through a kind of Jonathan Edwards Fire and Brimstone approach to convince the reader to get its religion, but when you sum it all up, there isn't much religion to get. All the pillars of the methodology have little or no exposition in the...
Veröffentlicht am 13. Mai 2000 von R. Williams


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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Develop Reliable Software Rapidly and Enjoyably, 29. Oktober 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change (Aw Professional) (Taschenbuch)
In this short and delightful book, Beck presents the underpinnings of the discipline of software development called "Extreme Programming", or XP. He tells us why the discipline works and the basics of how to do it. (More books are forthcoming, but start here.)
The book addresses lightweight approaches to customer communication, architecture, design, testing - the whole cycle of software development.
XP isn't for everyone: it is for people who have been and want to be passionate about programming, who want to do a good job in today's fast business environment, who are team players, and who are willing to be disciplined about how they do their work.
Hackery? Hardly. Those who fear that XP is "hacking" have not read or do not understand the book. XP is highly disciplined, including more customer contact, more testing, and more design than most projects ever see.
Required Warning: I'm the "self-proclaimed least" of the folks working with XP and writing about it. So I'm biased.
I'm biased for a particularly good reason: I had the chance to try XP in its purest form, on a project that had been in trouble. I wasn't sure everything would work - and where it didn't, we changed and improved the process. That learning is now in the book. I was often surprised by the way XP allowed a team of ordinary humans to consistently delight their customers.
To get the benefits, you have to do the process. Beck has given us the first volume of information on how to build software better, faster, and with more enjoyment.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen real process for rapid development in a dynamic environment, 6. April 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change (Aw Professional) (Taschenbuch)
I develop software in a dynamic (i.e. chaotic) environment where customers are rarely sure of what they want software to do for them. If we were able to completely blueprint a design and have the customer sign off on it, the requirements would likely have changed the next day.
Extreme Programming Explained puts forth the concept that software is and should be very malleable. It seems to be a variant of the spiral development process, with a chief distinction being that each cycle results in an actual integrated, deployed piece of software. A main differentiator is that XP offers a body of complementary techniques and principles that make very rapid development in a changing world possible.
Competition is too great for companies to risk nine months (of time and dollars) waiting for software that may not meet its needs by the time it is delivered. Getting working software in front of a customer in a very short period of time is critical. However, the overhead of proper reviews and testing cycles is usually too much for an ideal 2-3 week spiral cycle. Pair programming and automated tests, two important concepts that XP promotes, are specific techniques that purport to solve this problem.
One other major positive of this development "methodology" is that it centers around the fact that software is developed by teams of humans -- something most other processes almost never take into account. XP is not geared toward teams of hotshot, superstar developers. It instead realizes that most development organizations are a wide mix of capabilities and experience levels -- something extremely important in this age of a severely limited developer resource pool.
A few of the ideas presented are a bit nebulous, but I suspect that's to pave way for the followup books which will go into depth on actual practical application of the concepts. Lacking for me, personally, was a discussion on integration testing and the organizational shakeup that introducing of XP will definitely create. I'd also like to see more documented case studies. Otherwise, the book is a quick, enjoyable read.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen XP = the Psuedo Revolution, 13. Mai 2000
Von 
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change (Aw Professional) (Taschenbuch)
The claim, in one of the reviews here, that this book is going to rank w/the Gang of 4 book is patently absurd. This book attempts through a kind of Jonathan Edwards Fire and Brimstone approach to convince the reader to get its religion, but when you sum it all up, there isn't much religion to get. All the pillars of the methodology have little or no exposition in the book (unit testing, pair programming, constant builds). They are all mentioned and meekly argued for, but none of them are actually examined. Furthermore, I remember quite distinctly reading about pair programming in Larry Constantine's far better Peopleware a LONG TIME AGO!
Let me add one other crucial point here: this book attempts to achieve acceptance with the reader through creating an impression of both an epiphany and validation. I found that a lot of things that were being espoused here are things I've been doing a long time. I believe many people will find that to be true and consequently will like the book because of the sense of validation it gives. However, when I was done, I couldn't help but think about how much more could have been done here! How about talking about actual unit testing examples? Why not talk about structure within groups; it's far too easy to just say everyone should be doing everything. Profiling, for instance, is clearly not something everyone should be doing. Like so many things in the modern world, this is largely a retread wrapping itself in the cloak of a revolution.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Where's the beef?, 3. Juli 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change (Aw Professional) (Taschenbuch)
Chapter after chapter I kept thing that the author would get to something substantive. He never did. Not one example. Not one piece of concrete evidence. He had some good common sense ideas, but they are all presented in such general terms that they are self-evident. The author makes grand assumptions and goes on to explain (in generalizations) his theories which are based upon these assumptions. I often envisioned the author standing on a street corner proclaiming the end of the world or espousing the "scientific" basis of creationism while exposing his complete misunderstanding of science and his willingness to ignore facts that disprove his assertions. This entire book is written as if it were an introductory chapter. It reads like a psychology text - a lot of verbiage which hides the fact that the text has almost nothing to say.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Nothing new - but overwhelmingly surprising!, 9. Juli 2000
Von 
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change (Aw Professional) (Taschenbuch)
Although Beck does not introduce any new concepts, he structures the methodology of software development in a way I never met before. I have been fascinated by this book from the first to the last page - I even read the bibliography, which I do very, very seldom.
I just rated the book "4 stars" since Beck tends to repeat most issues he has to say several times. I would have appreciated a more strict concept of the book. Obviously, Beck is a brilliant software development guru, but just an entertaining, slightly above average author.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A new approach to software development, 23. Juni 2000
Von 
Kevin W. Parker (Greenbelt, MD) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change (Aw Professional) (Taschenbuch)
This approach to programming was much bandied about and a little controversial at a software engineering conference I recently attended. Beck's premise is to take proven good practices in software development and max them out:
- if code reviews are good, do code reviews constantly by having another programmer look over your shoulder.
- if testing is good, write your test plans first and then test each time you implement another feature
- if integration is good, integrate almost constantly so that the system always works
The underlying premise is that the old, familiar cost curve that says it costs a thousand times as much to fix a mistake in the testing phase as in the requirements phase is no longer accurate: we have much better tools now than when that curve was formulated, we're living in Internet time, and the customers don't know what the heck they want anyway. So we might as well go ahead and try to give them something, then fix it up later, rather than trying to divine their goals now.
The problem I see with this is that there's not much time allowed for doing analysis and design. Beck specifically counsels against trying to anticipate capabilities, but if you know what you're doing, anticipating capabilities can save you a lot of time down the line. (His rejoinder is that it can also cost you a lot of time in implementing and debugging features that don't work and may never be used.) No matter how clever you may be, doing design as you code seems to me to be one cut above the worst sort of hacking.
Still, there are some marvelous ideas in here: pair coding sounds intriguing, writing test plans first is a must-have, and I've always held the position that the system should be constantly integrated, that there should never be a big push at the end to get all the pieces to fit together.
He also has other, related advice: developers should not work overtime for more than one week in a row (that's a way to become less productive, not more), you should have a customer representative onsite with the programming team to answer lesser questions about how to implement capabilities, and so on.
In summary, this book is very worthwhile for anyone who wants to improve their software development practices (and who doesn't have problems with their software development practices?). It's particularly good if you're in an environment where the customer wants a quick response to what they want when they want it even as they're not sure what they want. I wouldn't recommend adopting the approach wholeheartedly and automatically (and neither would Beck), but take what makes sense and go from there. As Beck himself says, figure out where your biggest problem is and adopt XP practices there first.
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5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Empfehlenswertes Buch für die richtige Leser-Zielgruppe..., 10. Juni 2004
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change (Aw Professional) (Taschenbuch)
Das Buch ist recht dünn, es fasst 27 Kapitel die allesamt recht kurz sind. Beck's Stil und Englisch ist angenehm leicht zu lesen. Auch bemüht er sich immer wieder einige lustige Anekdoten zu bringen - das Buch liest sich daher insgesamt auch ziemlich flott. Auch überzeugt das Buch durch seinen klaren Aufbau, wenn auch Beck sich öfter mal zu Wiederholungen hinreißen lässt.
Das Buch
Drei Teile bestimmen das Buch, im ersten (" The Problem ") identifiziert und behandelt Beck Probleme die heutigen Softwareentwicklungsprojekten immer wieder das Genick brechen. Er zeigt die Kernvariablen auf, die seiner Meinung nach dafür verantwortlich sind und er baut die Grundlagen auf, auf welche er im Laufe des Buches immer wieder zurückgreift um geeignete Massnahmen vorzustellen.
Im zweiten Teil (" The Solution ") beschreibt er XP. Hier werden in etwa 70 Seiten die zwölf Prinzipien von XP vorgestellt und erklärt welche Zusammenhänge bestehen und wie sie sich untereinander beeinflussen.
Der dritte Teil (" Implementing XP ") hat mir persönlich am besten Gefallen, erstens ist dieser der eigentlichen Anwendung/Anpassung von XP gewidmet, er geht auf die Rollenverteilung und wichtige damit zusammenhängede Aspekte in XP Projekten ein (spart aber dennoch insgesamt an interessanten Details für die Praxis aus). Zweitens räumt hier Beck auch schon mal glaubhafter ein, dass XP aus seiner Sicht nicht immer die Antwort auf alle Fragen, 42, und sowieso das einzig Wahre ist und er führt Umstände an unter denen XP sich möglicherweise nicht erfolgreich einsetzen lässt. Zeitweise wirkt Beck's Stil nämlich durchaus etwas zu dogmatisch, zu besessen - ob zu Recht oder nicht, kann ich nicht beurteilen. Mir hat der Weg den die Autoren von XP - Software entwickeln mit eXtreme Programming gingen jedenfalls besser gefallen, die durchaus die Auffasung vertreten den Pfad der "reinen XP-Lehre" verlassen zu können, wenn ein Projekt mit einem an die lokalen Umstände angepassten Subset der XP Paradigmen auch, oder sogar wesentlich leichter, erfolgreich beendet werden kann.
Der Text endet effektiv nach etwa 166 Seiten, es folgt eine recht interessante Bibliografie, ein aus meiner Sicht nicht ganz so nützliches Glossar, ein Index und knapp 10 leere Seiten.
Fazit
Wer noch keinerlei Erfahrungen mit XP hat der findet "im Manifest" jedoch eine gelungene und angenehm zu lesende Einführung. Es eignet sich hier gleichermaßen für Personen aus den verschiedenen XP Rollen, vom Manager über den Kunden bis hin zum Entwickler. Insgesamt finde ich, dass das Buch seinen Zweck ziemlich gut erfüllt.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen An excellent but nontheless limited methodology, 13. Juni 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change (Aw Professional) (Taschenbuch)
In an ideal world almost any methology will work and I can't help but feel but that this methodology is also suited to such a world. Extreme Programming concerns itself with the minutae of code development and appears largely to reject the notion of having an overall design. This approach dangerously weakens the concept of a there being a 'Big Picture' into which a system fits and overemphasises the idea that everything can be broken down into small independent units. Unfortunately it does't follow that if the parts work then so will the whole.
Whilst the methodology is at its best in dealing with these small units it is weak on how best these units should be assembled and the combined constructs tested. Unfortuately it is rare that coding level problems affect a project as much as system level ones.
Another problem with this methodology is that it generally ejects the customer from the development cycle. It's all very well going to the customer initially but, if you then pull the shutters down and only seek feedback whenever there is a new version, customer confidence will rapidly drain away. Frequently asking a customer "How does this version look?" doesn't garner confidence.
There are good ideas put forward in the book too. The princple one is that of 'pair programming'. This can be useful when new ideas are being tackled, less so when dealing with the 'mundane' coding. Overall, the best ideas advocated in this book (forward planning, frequent testing, better communication, etc) are actually independent of the methodology itself and when applied as intended with any methodology would produce improvements.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen An excellent but nontheless limited methodology, 13. Juni 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change (Aw Professional) (Taschenbuch)
In an ideal world almost any methology will work and I can't help but feel but that this methodology is also suited to such a world. Extreme Programming concerns itself with the minutae of code development and appears largely to reject the notion of having an overall design. This approach dangerously weakens the concept of a there being a 'Big Picture' into which a system fits and overemphasises the idea that everything can be broken down into small independent units. Unfortunately it does't follow that if the parts work then so will the whole. Whilst the methodology is at its best in dealing with these small units it is weak on how best these units should be assembled and the combined constructs tested. Unfortuately it is rare that coding level problems affect a project as much as system level ones. Another problem with this methodology is that it generally ejects the customer from the development cycle. It's all very well going to the customer initially but, if you then pull the shutters down and only seek feedback whenever there is a new version, customer confidence will rapidly drain away. Frequently asking a customer "How does this version look?" doesn't garner confidence.
There are good ideas put forward in the book too. The princple one is that of 'pair programming'. This can be useful when new ideas are being tackled, less so when dealing with the 'mundane' coding. Overall, the best ideas advocated in this book (forward planning, frequent testing, better communication, etc) are actually independent of the methodology itself and when applied as intended with any methodology would produce improvements.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Purely amature, 22. Februar 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change (Aw Professional) (Taschenbuch)
While "Extreme Programing" has a number of sensible suggestions, the net-effect of it is quite marginal. I read numerous positive reviews and was hopeful when ordering the book, but was rather disappointed in the end.
The prose of the book is quite poor, almost to the point of annoying. Everything in the book is referred to as "Extreme Programming" or "XP" which really nullifies the term. The author also has very little support for most of his arguments, which leads a reader to wonder if some of the ideas presented are mere whim.
If you don't already own this book, then save yourself the bother. There are a number of books along the premise of "Extreme Programming" which are much more useful in the end:
"Rapid Development" and "Code Complete" (both by Steve McConnell)
"The Pragmatic Programmer" (Andrew Hunt).
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Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change (Aw Professional)
Extreme Programming Explained: Embrace Change (Aw Professional) von Kent Beck (Taschenbuch - 22. Oktober 1999)
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