Kundenrezensionen


79 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (60)
4 Sterne:
 (8)
3 Sterne:
 (4)
2 Sterne:
 (2)
1 Sterne:
 (5)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Close Shave With Occam's Razor
The rule of Occam's Razor is that the simplest explanation that fits the facts is usually the correct one. Although no one can yet know whether Dawkins is right in his neo-Darwinian view of the gene, his argument certainly seems simpler and more consistent than those he argues against. Basically, his point is that evolution must be analyzed from the perspective of...
Veröffentlicht am 17. Mai 2000 von Donald Mitchell

versus
3.0 von 5 Sternen Read Dawkins in the way Copernicus read Ptolemy
Dawkins admits he settled on the title of his book "The Selfish Gene" more for the "ring" than the "thing". By the time that he disclaims any attempts by anyone to use his thesis for making biological arguments for AynRandism, he's grown quite a formidable beard upon his intellectual face that might well benefit from some ministration by...
Am 3. Februar 1997 veröffentlicht


‹ Zurück | 1 28 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Close Shave With Occam's Razor, 17. Mai 2000
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Selfish Gene (Taschenbuch)
The rule of Occam's Razor is that the simplest explanation that fits the facts is usually the correct one. Although no one can yet know whether Dawkins is right in his neo-Darwinian view of the gene, his argument certainly seems simpler and more consistent than those he argues against. Basically, his point is that evolution must be analyzed from the perspective of what is likely to have facilitated or discouraged the continued reproduction of a given bit of DNA. Most alternative theorists favor looking from the perspective of the individual carrying the DNA or the group the individual belongs to.
On the eve of the deciphering of the human genome, this is a terrific time to read this thought-provoking book. Basically, the book repeatedly looks at observed plant and animal behavior in terms of whether it furthers reproduction of a particular gene or set of genes. In most cases, Dawkins can construct a mathematical argument that is reasonably plausible to support his thesis. The only places where you may be uncomfortable is that the conclusions often depend on the assumptions that go into the models used. Those cited by Dawkins work. Others would not in many cases. That's where the room for doubt arises.
I was especially impressed when he took the same arguments into the realm of conscious behavior, looking at classic problems like the Prisoner's Dilemma and explaining it from a genetic reproduction perspective. He also built some very nice arguments for why altruism can turn out to be an appropriate form of positive genetic selection.
The main thing that bothered me as I read the book is that I was under the impression that in humans the female's genes account for 2/3rds of the offspring's total genes, while the male's genes account for 1/3. If that is true, then I am left at sea by the fact that all of the examples assume equal amounts of genes from the male and the female. I was left wondering if other species are typically 50-50, so that humans are the exception.
I don't know how to account for this because I lack that knowledge. The introduction says that the publisher would not let there be a wholesale rewrite of the book in the new edition. Perhaps this is something that Dawkins wanted to revise and could not. There are two new chapters, and they are both quite interesting.
If most mammalian species are 2/3 to 1/3, then many of the examples involving mammals are miscalculated. It would be worth redoing them if that is the case. I suspect that the conclusions would still be robust, however, directionally.
Any work of speculation will always be subject to refinement and revision. I hope Dawkins keeps working on this one. His thinking has great potential for outlining new questions for research.
One of the delights of this book is finding about plant and animal behaviors that I had never known about before. My favorite was the irresistible cuckoo gape. Apparently, a baby cuckoo in a next with its beak open begging for food is somehow so compelling that other birds carrying food back to another nest will stop by and give the food instead to the baby cuckoo. The book is full of thought-provoking examples like this that will keep me thinking for years.
Dawkins is a very fine writer, and employs a number of simple, but compelling stories and analogies to carry forth complicated mathematical arguments. Even if you hate math, you will follow and enjoy his writing. Unlike many popular science books, he writes to his reader rather than down to his reader.
Another benefit you will get from this book is a methodology for thinking through why behavior may make sense that otherwise looks foolish from the perspective of the individual (like bees dying to defend the hive). You will never look at behavior in quite the same way again.
Enjoy!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Enjoy the clear text but buy it for the content., 17. Dezember 1998
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Selfish Gene (Taschenbuch)
Reading Yehouda Harpaz' review, I realized that some people have trouble understanding Dawkins' ideas, apparently because they would rather confine evolution to a limited area -- the biology of animals -- and keep it from applying to humans, most especially to our minds. I'd like to express some of the ideas in Dawkins' book to entice you and clarify these misconceptions.
1) The central thesis is that genes act as if their intention was to selfishly help themselves spread throughout the gene pool. This is not because they have the ability to make decisions or are capable of being selfish the way a person could. It's simply that those that happen to act as if they had wanted to spread do spread, and they do so at the expense of the rest. This notion of apparent design from natural selection is the keystone of neo-Darwinism.
2) The idea of analyzing evolution by looking at how each individual gene spreads itself in the environment of other genes is not only clear but illuminating, solving problems that the organism-centered approach cannot. Remember, an environment consists of whatever circumstances, objects, or conditions one is surrounded by. That means that, just as it makes perfect sense to say that other people form part of each person's environment, it is logical that other genes form part of a gene's environment. A gene competes with other alleles -- alternative genes at its locus -- and often does so by cooperating with genes at other loci, as per Dawkins' rowing team analogy.
3) It's not that Dawkins ignores neurobiology, but that he supports the new understanding that there is neither biological nor cultural determinism for behavior, but rather development based on epigenetic rules. In other words, Dawkins denies the Standard Social Science Model of tabula rasa human nature, replacing it with a less extremist stance that is demonstrably true. As Steven Pinker makes very clear in _How The Mind Works_, humans are intelligent not because we are free from the instincts that drive other animals but because of our ability to use the mental organs that implement our instincts to solve general-purpose problems.
4) Dawkins does not in any way restrict cultural transmission to imitation. However, as his interest is in its neo-Darwinistic evolution, not mere transmission or random change, he focuses on the units of replication -- the memes -- that are naturally selected among. This is particularly interesting since it opens up the way to understanding the coevolution of genes and memes, as E. O. Wilson explains in _Consilience_.
In summary, if you want to understand these issues, don't take Yehouda's word on this or even mine. Get the book and read it for yourself. Life is so much more interesting than anti-evolutionists would have you imagine, and Dawkins is so painfully clear that even the layman has to work hard to misunderstand him. He is, quite literally, a joy to read.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


8 von 10 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Der Mensch als Genmaschine, 18. Januar 2006
Von 
Michael Dienstbier "Privatrezensent ohne fina... (Bochum) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)    (REAL NAME)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Selfish Gene (Taschenbuch)
"Replicators began not merely to exist, but to construct for themselves containers, vehicles for their continued existence. The replicarors that survived were the ones that built survival machines for themselves to live in" (19).

Dawkins These ist also, dass die Replikatoren, sprich die Gene, Maschinen für ihr eigenes Überleben konstruiert haben. Maschinen wie einfache Zellen, Pflanzen, Tiere und den Menschen.
In klarer Sprache für ein Laienpublikum geschrieben und dennoch auf einem intellektuell atemberaubenden Niveau, beantwortet der Oxfordprofessor die Fragen, die uns alle umtreibt: Woher kommen wir? Was ist der Sinn des Lebens?

Als einer der leidenschaftlichsten Kämpfer für die Evolutionslehre analysiert und bewertet Richard Dawkins die überwältigende Menge an Indizien und Beweisen, die belegen, dass wir das nicht-zielgerichtete Produkt eines auf natürlicher Auslese beruhenden Prozesses sind. Das wiederum bedeutet aber eben nicht, dass der Mensch ein rein zufälliges Produkt ist. Natürliche Selektion hat nichts mit Zufall zu tun. Sie bevorzugt die Eigenschaften, die sich in der Praxis bewährt haben, das Überleben eines Organismuses zu sichern. Nichts könnte weniger mit Zufall zu tun. Es gibt auch zufällige Veränderungen des Genmaterials, die sogenannten Mutationen, die, wenn sie sich als tauglich erweisen, von der natürlichen Selektion bevorzugt werden. Es ist jedoch absolut notwendig, diese beiden Mechansimen, natürliche Selektion und Zufallsmutationen, auseinanderzuhalten. In seinem Buch The Blind Watchmaker formuliert Dawkins folgenderweise: "Natural selection, the blind, unconscious, automatic process which Darwin discovered, and which we now know is the explanation for the existence and apparently purposeful form of all life, has no purpose in mind" (5).

Dass "The Selfish Gene" mittlerweile zu einem absoluten Klassiker geworden ist, liegt an dem von Dawkins eingeführten Begriffs des "meme". Ein meme ist "a unit of cultural transmission, or a unit of imitation" (192). Ein meme ist also das geistige Gegenstück zu einem Gen und enthält nicht das biologische sondern das kulturelle Erbgut des Menschen. Ein meme kann alles sein: Kleidung, Essen, Frisuren, Musik, Fernsehen, Kino, Tänze usw.

Als besonders hartnäckiges und gefährliches meme hat sich, so Dawkins, die Religion erwiesen. Mit Mitteln der Wissenschaft kämpft er gegen den Wahrheitsanspruch der Religionen, welche diesen mit nichts anderen als uralten Mythen für sich in Anspruch nehmen und sich auch nicht davon abschrecken lassen, dass sämtlich in der Bibel aufgeführten Erklärungsmodelle bereits einwandfrei widerlegt worden sind: "God exists, if only in form of a meme with high survival value, or infective power, in the environment provided by human culture" (193).

Fazit: "The Selfish Gene" ist ein Klassiker! Richard Dawkins gibt den Menschen eine Stimme, die fassungslos mit ansehen müssen, wie der religiöse Fundamentalismus in Amerika und zunehmend auch in Deutschland die Errungenschaften der Wissenschaft und der Aufklärung bekämpft. Aber mit intellektuellen Vorreitern wie Dawkins braucht keiner die anstehenden Debatten zu fürchten.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4.0 von 5 Sternen Makes you think -- which IS the point, after all..., 1. Mai 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Selfish Gene (Taschenbuch)
Dawkins' book "The Selfish Gene" is an attempt to explain how evolution, development, and animal behavior all contribute to the kinds of living things around us.
The main theme of the book is that genes are the units that are in control, and in order for them to perpetuate themselves (to their own selfish ends), they have combined and cooperated with other selfish genes to produce large structurally complex biological machines that have only one driving force -- to replicate themselves, thereby allowing the selfish genes that produced them to also be replicated.
Much of the explanation of things follows suit. I did not, however, swallow it all hook line and sinker. The main point of the book is designed to get you to think about how genes may not only have worked to generate the physical bodies that organisms have, but their various behaviors as well.
I believe that Dawkins' point goes a bit too far on the gene driven side, and doesn't allow enough allowance for environmental considerations during an organism's life span in explaining the origin of animal behavior.
I read this book with a group of undergraduate students last fall. While most of them didn't buy into the whole story completely, the book did get them to THINK about things. And that, in my opinion, is what the book is all about.
Whatever you do, make sure that you read the book AND the endnotes for each chapter as you go. It'll make more sense that way, and the end notes let you see how some of his thoughts developed, and how some of them were eventually discarded by him.
By the way, I enjoyed the two new chapters Dawkins added at the end of the 1989 edition, though the last chapter was basically an advertisement for another of his books, "The Extended Phenotype."
Worth a deliberate read.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Who should read this book? - You!!!, 2. November 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Selfish Gene (Taschenbuch)
Anbei meine Kritik zu Dawkins' genialem Buch, die so in der Vereinszeitschrift der deutschen Mensa (MinD), der "bagatelle", abgedruckt war.
Buchempfehlung: Richard Dawkins »The Selfish Gene«
Vielleicht werden es einige von Euch schon kennen, andere werden sagen: »Ein alter Hut«. Ist die erste Ausgabe doch auch schon 1976 erschienen. Die Ausgabe, die ich hier empfehle, ist allerdings jüngeren Datums, Erscheinungsjahr 1989, und enthält neben zwei völlig neuen Kapiteln (davon eines, »Nice guys finish first«, mit einer wunderbaren Beschreibung der Geschichte des »Tit for Tat«) eine Fülle von »Endnoten« zu den ursprünglichen Kapiteln, insgesamt 66 klein bedruckte Seiten zu 200 Seiten Originaltext ! Dabei wurden die Originalkapitel bis auf die Anbringung der Verweise zu den Endnoten völlig unverändert gelassen. Es gibt hier nichts zu verbessern ! (Die Endnoten stellen meist nur neuere Forschungsergebnisse bzw. weitergehende Erläuterungen und Diskussionen zum ursprünglich gesagten dar.)
Worum also geht es in diesem Buch, das wie kaum ein anderes für Zündstoff und erregte Diskussionen unter Wissenschaftlern und Laien gesorgt hat? Titelgebend und themabestimmend sind diese kleinen, unsterblichen Quirle, die wir alle zu Myriaden in uns tragen; die unser Leben bestimmen, lange bevor wir selbst es können; unsere Baumeister, Architekten und manchmal auch Dompteure: die Gene.
Hauptthese ist nun, was vielen von uns so unverdaulich erscheint, daß sie automatisch und unvermeidlich in Abwehrstellung gehen und hände- bzw. gehirnringend nach Gegenargumenten suchen: daß nämlich diese unsere Gene ganz und gar egoistische kleine Kerls sind, die jede nur erdenkliche Möglichkeit und jeden Trick, sei er auch noch so »mies«, ausnutzen, um sich selber einen Vorteil zu verschaffen; auf Kosten all der anderen egoistischen Gene...
Das, nicht mehr und nicht weniger, bedeutet schließlich das viel zitierte und doch selten zu Ende gedachte »Survival of the fittest«.
Richard Dawkins nun denkt zu Ende. Und er läßt dabei keine Möglichkeit aus, beim humanistisch geprägten Leser von einem Fettnäpfchen ins nächste zu treten. Er räumt gnadenlos auf mit so ethisch-moralisch wohlklingenden Theorien wie der (Altruismus in der Gruppe voraussetzenden) Gruppenselektion und zeigt, daß in Wahrheit in der Welt der Replikatoren nur eine Regel herrscht: du oder ich. Sein für viele sicher schwer verdauliches Ergebnis: Altruismus kann es auf der Ebene der Gene nicht geben !
Ein wesentlicher, immer wiederkehrender Begriff in seinen Argumentationen ist der der »Evolutionär Stabilen Strategie«, abgekürzt ESS. Eine ESS ist grob gesagt eine Strategie, die durch Anwendung ihrer selbst dafür sorgt, daß es den nachfolgenden Generationen (mit Kopien ihrer selbst) besser, bzw. zumindest nicht schlechter geht. Und das vor dem Hintergrund aller möglichen anderen, konkurrierenden Strategien, die das gleiche versuchen. Hier wird sich also, wie man intuitiv zu erkennen glaubt, auf Dauer diejenige Strategie durchsetzen, die den anderen gegenüber Vorteile - und seien es auch noch so kleine - hat. Die mathematische Spieltheorie hatte hier maßgeblichen Einfluß auf die biologische Forschung, und Dawkins zeigt an vielen einfachen Beispielen, wie eine ESS funktioniert. Diese Strategien sind es, die das Bild des Lebens, so wie wir es kennen, prägen und bestimmen.
Denkt jetzt aber bitte nicht, das Buch behandle nur so leblose und uninteressante Dinge wie evolutionäre Strategien, Desoxyribonukleinsäuren und andere Brain-Twister. Hauptthema des Buches ist natürlich - wie bei jedem guten Buch - der Mensch. (Wenn er auch ganz selten explizit erwähnt wird - an Beispielen aus dem Tierreich, vorzugsweise Ameisen oder ähnlich ekligem Kribbelgetier, lassen sich unangenehme Wahrheiten doch auch viel schonender vermitteln. Aber keine Angst: mit dem Umweg über die schon erwähnte mathematische Spieltheorie kommt dann schließlich auch wieder der Altruismus »ins Spiel«.)
Aber ich möchte hier natürlich nicht zu viel vorwegnehmen, sondern nur Appetit und Interesse wecken auf ein ganz vorzügliches Buch. Zündstoff enthält es mehr als genug, etwa in den Kapiteln »Battle of the sexes« oder »Battle of the generations«, und die Diskussionsthemen werden euch eine Zeitlang kaum ausgehen (vor allem mit Leuten, die das Buch nicht gelesen haben und doch zu verstehen glauben...).
Das Buch enthält jedenfalls eine Fülle von Informationen und wird denjenigen, die bereit sind, sich offen darauf einzulassen, vielleicht ein ganz neues Bild der Welt und ihrer selbst, auf jeden Fall aber eine Menge biologisch-evolutionstheoretisches Wissen - verpackt in jede Menge Lesespaß - vermitteln. Dawkins ist zeitweise brillant, und wird nie langweilig.
Und so ganz nebenbei erfährt die geneigte Leserin noch so nützliche Details, wie z.B. die sexuelle Leistungsfähigkeit ihres Lovers zu steigern ist. Das Ergebnis steht auf Seite 5, ist radikal, wissenschaftlich abgesichert und absolut verblüffend ! (Es soll aber leider nicht bei allen Spezies funktionieren...).
Schließen möchte ich meine diesjährige Buchempfehlung (keine Angst - nächstes Jahr lese ich wieder eins !) mit einer Stimme des englischen Klappentextes, der wenig hinzuzufügen ist:
»Who should read this book ? Everyone interested in the universe and their place in it.«
Martin Weiß
PS: Für alle, denen das englische Original sprachlich zu schwer verdaulich ist, gibt es inzwischen auch eine deutsche Übersetzung, erschienen im Spektrum-Verlag unter dem Titel »Das egoistische Gen«.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Why the dichotomy?, 19. Februar 2000
Von 
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Selfish Gene (Taschenbuch)
Like most of the reviewers here, I can't say enough about "The Selfish Gene" and how enthusiastically I'd recommend it to everyone. All the negative reviews seem to be either dissections of Dawkin's decades-old science (big surprise that '70s biology has been improved upon), or the rather expected knee-jerk religious condemnation.
With regards to the evolution/creation debate, I honestly can't understand the dichotomy here. Reading this book (three times) didn't destroy my faith in God - quite the reverse. Studying auto mechanics does not lessen your appreciation for the automobile, but rather instills in you a sense of awe at the complexity and synergy of the machine.
The fact that a Creator has provided us with a universe governed by laws and containing the materials whereby progressively advanced "gene colonies" inevitably evolve and lumber out of the ooze is awe-inspiring!
Do you have to believe in a God that has programmed us all completely with goodness and The Devil put in charge of the apple distribution? Personally, I think it preposterous that God dropped such flawed creatures as humans on this planet as a finished product. Finished product? Take a look at the design of the ear's semi-circular canal for maintaining balance: it's terrible engineering! If we were made in God's image we would be perfect or very nearly; since we're not we must be a work in progress.
Dawkins wrote a great book; maybe not a perfect one, but then nobody's perfect.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


3.0 von 5 Sternen Read Dawkins in the way Copernicus read Ptolemy, 3. Februar 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Selfish Gene (Taschenbuch)
Dawkins admits he settled on the title of his book "The Selfish Gene" more for the "ring" than the "thing". By the time that he disclaims any attempts by anyone to use his thesis for making biological arguments for AynRandism, he's grown quite a formidable beard upon his intellectual face that might well benefit from some ministration by logical soap and a well strapped Occam's razor.

If one buys into the mechanomorphic universe -- brainlessly -- one might be impressed by his contortion and nowhere moreso than in his concept of "meme" (rhymes with gene). Why does he make the "gene" the fundamental unit of survival rather than the carbon atom, and why the "meme" instead of the "phoneme".

No -- not only is his thesis counter intuitive, it is practically irrelevant. Primates associate -- and those that never do, die before reproducing. Why he has to make this philosophical point about altruism is beyond me. It is a red herring whose stench just worsens with time as more and more people seek to legitimate anti-social behavior.

It would have sufficed had he asserted simply that it tends to be in the enlightened self-interest of individuals to form adaptive, synergistic groups.

But, then he wouldn't have been able, really, to advance his notion of the "meme" (rhymes with gene).

This is one for the Eugenics Bookshelf.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


4.0 von 5 Sternen It changed my view on the links between genes and behavior, 13. Dezember 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Selfish Gene (Taschenbuch)
As many readers mentionned it, this book contains a paradigm-shifting view on natural selection centered on the replication of individual genes.It also presents an open-minded view on the nature of genes that is very different from the one habitually popularized. Because of it, this book made me see for the first time with a favorable eye explanations linking together genes and behavior. In it, no gene is said to be the unique and direct cause of a behavior. It rather says that when all other factors stay the same, including environmental factors, changing a sole gene could alter a behavior in a given and precise way. That is a very different view.
The book is easy and pleasant to read. Concepts usually drowned in lots of technical details are here simply put and clearly explained. It is a clever book. It uses a lot of logical and deductive thinking, accompanied with many experimentaly verifiable predictions. It also seems to me a somewhat speculative book because it suggests implicitly that all differences in observed animal behavior could be linked to specific genes, which is far from being proven.
It is also a paradoxical book. On one side, it gives due credit to the mecanism of genes replication, and so clarifies many aspects of natural selection. On the other side, it deliberately uses, as a convenient shorten way of speaking, a language attributing some will to the genes, which tends to confuse the issue.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


3.0 von 5 Sternen Now we will all have to decide what to do with this, 16. August 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Selfish Gene (Taschenbuch)
After reading the other reviews, especially the one advocating eugenics, I am scared about the implications of this book.
While not a scientist, I think the science is good, and probably most of his ideas are at least on the right track. That, taken by itself could lead to some scary concusions unless otherwise directed.
Let us all remember that human nature has been greatly affected by religion. A common ideal or common religion was the glue that has bound civilizations together, and I would venture to guess that the affinity to believe the prevailing religion has been a trait that bettered a human's chance of survival. In other words, we have been naturally selected to be religious.
People long for religion, they long for something to believe in. As Marx said "Religion is the opiate of the masses." With that in mind, needless to say we have a bit of a dilema. On the one side we can search for pure truth. On the other side, we can search for something that makes us feel better. Which is a better choice?
My conclusion is that religious tolerance and even promotion of religions that favor kindness towards others is our best hope. Kind of like a Christianity with all the "love your neighbor" and none of the "yer gonna burn in hell."
This may not quite be scientifically correct, but in the end isn't it more important to be happy than to be wise?
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


3 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A brilliant book which will blow your mind (be careful)..., 5. Mai 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Selfish Gene (Taschenbuch)
I first read The Selfish Gene about twenty years ago riding on a train from Long Island into Manhattan. The experience was a startling one (as much a mind-altering drug as a book) and it shaped my basic beliefs on human nature for many years. Dawkins writes with astounding power and The Selfish Gene has been crafted to produce the maximum impact, both intellectually and emotionally, on the reader. If you accept the tenets of natural selection, you cannot help but be pulled into Dawkin's graphic and relentless narrative of selfish genes in the first part of this book.
But remember, Dawkins is as much a superb salesman as a scientist. Although natural selection offers rational clues as to how adaptive characteristics are preserved and passed on to successive generations, it is a great leap of faith (dare I use the word!) from that model to one which reduces all life and mental processes to automata. As quantum physics has discovered, reductionism fails when the natural laws and mechanisms which allow scientists to adequately model the macroscopic world cannot fully rationalise events on a much smaller or older scale
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 28 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

The Selfish Gene
The Selfish Gene von Richard Dawkins (Taschenbuch - 19. Oktober 1989)
Gebraucht & neu ab: EUR 7,08
Auf meinen Wunschzettel Zahlungsmöglichkeiten ansehen
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen