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5.0 von 5 Sternen super buch, 8. Dezember 2013
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work (Taschenbuch)
A very interesting read for everybody who is doubting whether company culture and our working routines make any sense at all
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Necessary book, 7. Juni 2013
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work (Taschenbuch)
Extremely interesting book. It makes you think seriously about our hyper-sophisticated civilization, which is actually so fragile and prone to fail thanks to the gradual loss of knowledge.
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0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Super, 23. August 2010
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work (Taschenbuch)
Es ist nicht so einfach zu lesen aber sher gut.
This book makes one re-think what one is doing in life, a real thinking wo/man's book.
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2 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Searching for Meaningful Work, 22. Juli 2009
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Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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"Therefore, my beloved brethren, be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that your toil is not in vain in the Lord." -- 1 Corinthians 15:58

Imagine that you build sand castles for a living. It could be pretty frustrating. When the tide comes in, a wave will wash away all but the memory of your work. Or if the waves don't get you, a careless foot may. Alternatively, the wind will blow your castle down.

It's the nature of a very secular society to seek enormous satisfactions from work. After all, it's what we mostly do on Monday through Friday. Matthew Crawford describes his experiences and observations about how to gain pleasure and meaning from work. He does so from an unusual perspective. He has a Ph.D. in political philosophy from the University of Chicago but prefers to repair old motorcycles.

After you go through the story of his working life, you'll be reminded of all those wonderful vignettes in Studs Terkel's book, Working. You don't have to be president of the United States to find work satisfying.

Mr. Crawford posits these kinds of qualities for making work meaningful:

1. You work on something you care about.
2. You come into contact with those whose lives will be affected by your work.
3. The nature of the tasks is inherently satisfying to you.
4. You get to solve difficult problems.
5. You develop expertise that makes the work more enjoyable and helpful.
6. You use creative thinking.
7. You are not bound by time, space, or quotas.

For much of the book, he describes in glowing terms how great motorcycle repair is for him . . . and some of the satisfactions of electrical work. He also takes Dilbert-like potshots at routine office work, particularly when it is done in an assembly-line-like fashion. From that platform, it would have been easy to describe many more kinds of work, describing what to seek out and what to avoid. But he held back from making such general points where they cried out to be made.

As a management consultant, I was fascinated to see that his view of management consulting was of something very theoretical and impractical. Having done this kind of work for over forty years, I would say management consulting work is often a great deal like motorcycle repair work . . . but without the skinned knuckles. The book would have been stronger if he had taken the time to do what Studs Terkel did and ask workers what they like and don't like about various occupations.

I do agree that exposure to physical work should emphasize appreciating the disciplines involved rather than just mastering some information, making an ornament for the home, or getting through a required course. It is a big mistake to downplay the various trades. Many of my happiest friends learned to be masters of various trades after finding little practical use for their liberal arts degrees.

To me, the biggest missed point related to the spirituality of work. Your job can be one of the ways that your worship the Lord and serve Him. Some pretty grubby work can feel great when you know that it's what the Lord wants you to be doing for Him: One of the most gratifying days of work in my life was digging latrines for an orphanage in Mexico where the children had no indoor plumbing.

Let me leave you with one word of caution: The book opens more slowly and less interestingly than it becomes. Stick with it for at least a hundred pages before deciding that you like or can't stand what's being described.
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Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work
Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work von Matthew B. Crawford (Taschenbuch - 27. April 2010)
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