Kundenrezensionen


26 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (19)
4 Sterne:
 (4)
3 Sterne:
 (2)
2 Sterne:
 (1)
1 Sterne:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The definitive Cold War espionage novel
This book defined a genre. From the elegance of the language, to the betrayal and harsh brutality of the plot's finale, this novel set the standard against which all other espionage fiction of the Cold War would be judged. Whatever the truth of the matter, Le Carre's fiction created a world which is so real that subsequent spy novels departed from its parameters at...
Veröffentlicht am 6. Dezember 1999 von Doug Vaughn

versus
0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen ziemlich altbacken!
Es ist gut zu merken, dass sich seit den Anfängen des kalten Krieges die Welt verändert hat, sicher nicht immer zum Guten aber immerhin. Es war deshalb gleichzeitig teils langweilig teils spannend. Der Schluss ist natürlich sehr dramatisch und hat mich aufgewühlt.
Vor 19 Monaten von extra veröffentlicht


‹ Zurück | 1 2 3 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The definitive Cold War espionage novel, 6. Dezember 1999
This book defined a genre. From the elegance of the language, to the betrayal and harsh brutality of the plot's finale, this novel set the standard against which all other espionage fiction of the Cold War would be judged. Whatever the truth of the matter, Le Carre's fiction created a world which is so real that subsequent spy novels departed from its parameters at their peril.
The story at the heart of The Spy Who Came in from the Cold implicates all sides in the struggle in a hypocritical conspiriacy of betrayal and disloyalty. The message seems to be that no good deed goes unpunished and that things certainly are not what they seem.
A truely great book, with characters one cares for and a deftly plotted story that both surprises and distresses the reader. The message of the book is not a pleasant one, but then the reality of Cold War espionage was not pleasant either.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A chilling tale of deceit and deception, 13. Februar 2010
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Spy Who Came in from the Cold (Taschenbuch)
This classic became a worldwide bestseller and was turned into a successful movie starring Richard Burton as the British spy Alec Leamas (AL). It also enabled John Le Carré (JLC) to say farewell to the British Foreign Office and devote himself full time to writing. First published in 1963, this book has not really aged. JLC's books are about what Americans call HUMINT (human intelligence), characters living under cover, determined to go unnoticed. In contrast to Ian Fleming's creation James Bond, JLC's heroes attach little importance to technology. For them no high living, casinos, amazing gadgets or crazy men planning to rule the world or steal the gold from Fort Knox. With one exception (A Murder of Quality), in the novels from the 1960s and 1970s the Cold War is the backdrop and the Russians and their satellites, the enemies.
AL has been the Circus West Berlin man for ten years, until his networks in East Germany are destroyed one by one by Mundt, who has quickly risen in East Berlin's intelligence apparatus after killing two of his own agents in London and managing to escape from the UK. Empty-handed, AL returns to London, where he is shelved in the Circus' Banking section. This is the beginning of his life spiralling downward, or is he being brought back into play? Where people work with people, mistakes are made. AL meets the assistant librarian Liz, who has been a Communist party member since 1954, and decides not to involve her in the legend being created around his person by Control and his staff, amongst whom George Smiley. The Circus is unaware of their affair...
Superlative writing, great characters, mounting tension, unexpected turns in the plot and a dramatic and cynical finale. It is a recipe for compulsive reading. JLC's oeuvre is eminently re-readable. Masterpiece.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A beautiful story within a cold-war shell, 28. November 1999
As someone who has always been facinated by the world of secret agents and the cold war, this book was a wonderful step in my education of what went on during that period. I have seen more than enough movies, and I have read a few fiction and non-fiction books about the era, but this was a fictional work of art. Although it is a short book, I often had to go back and reread parts because of the enormous complexity. From a literature standpoint, Le Carre's characters are so real that you don't need to try to imagine what they are really like; they simply are what they are while avoiding your prototypical characters. I would definately recommend this book for anyone with any interest in the cold war, spies, or simply good works of literature. A true classic.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen More than just the greatest spy story every written, 3. Juli 1999
Von Ein Kunde
If it is true that every author has one great book in him, then for John Le Carre this is the one. Many of his other novels are indeed excellent spy stories (especially Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy), but in my opinion The Spy Who Came In From The Cold actually rises to the level literature. The Cold War is recent history, but this book tells us more about that period than anything else written so far. It is probably also the definitive work on spies and espionage, and will stand the test of time. A great book.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Kalter Krieg pur, 6. Januar 2012
Es war ein Versuch, auch einmal ein Buch von John le Carre auf Englisch zu lesen. Der Versuch hat gut geklappt und der Krimi lest sich nahezu problemlos auf Englisch.
Der Leser wird brutal zurückgeführt in die tiefsten Zeiten des kalten Krieges. Ich frage mich ernsthaft, ob Leser, die keinen Bezug zu dieser Zeit mehr haben, das Ganze nicht einfach als reinste, evt. Sogar als unglaubwürdige Fiktion abtun. Dabei darf man nicht vergessen, dass tatsächlich und obendrein viel spioniert wurde ' und vermutlich wird ' zwischen Ost und West. Alle möglichen Tricks wurden angewandt und auch die Agentenaustausch-Aktionen auf der Glienicker Brücke fanden wirklich statt.

Zur Story: Zug um Zug werden britische Agenten in der DDR enttarnt und liquidiert. Nun beginnt ein raffiniertes Agentenspiel um Alec Leamas, den Helden der Geschichte. Nach außen scheint es so, dass er von den Briten abgeschrieben wird, ins Abdachlosenmilieu abschmiert und vom KGB angeworben wird. Wer nun in diesem Spiel welche Rolle spielt, wer Doppelagent ist und welche 'hidden agendas' da verfolgt werden ist meisterhaft von John le Carre in Szene gesetzt und nur schwer durchschaubar. Spannung pur.

Am Ende kommt die Liebe ins Spiel und alles wird noch um einiges komplizierter. Ob`s ein Happyend gibt wird aber nicht verraten.
Fazit: Für Menschen, die mit dem Begriff 'Kalter Krieg' etwas anzufangen wissen, ein Meisterwerk und ein glasklares Muss. Für alle anderen nicht zwingend empfehlenswert.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Kalter Krieg pur, 6. Januar 2012
Es war ein Versuch, auch einmal ein Buch von John le Carre auf Englisch zu lesen. Der Versuch hat gut geklappt und der Krimi lest sich nahezu problemlos auf Englisch.
Der Leser wird brutal zurückgeführt in die tiefsten Zeiten des kalten Krieges. Ich frage mich ernsthaft, ob Leser, die keinen Bezug zu dieser Zeit mehr haben, das Ganze nicht einfach als reinste, evt. Sogar als unglaubwürdige Fiktion abtun. Dabei darf man nicht vergessen, dass tatsächlich und obendrein viel spioniert wurde ' und vermutlich wird ' zwischen Ost und West. Alle möglichen Tricks wurden angewandt und auch die Agentenaustausch-Aktionen auf der Glienicker Brücke fanden wirklich statt.

Zur Story: Zug um Zug werden britische Agenten in der DDR enttarnt und liquidiert. Nun beginnt ein raffiniertes Agentenspiel um Alec Leamas, den Helden der Geschichte. Nach außen scheint es so, dass er von den Briten abgeschrieben wird, ins Abdachlosenmilieu abschmiert und vom KGB angeworben wird. Wer nun in diesem Spiel welche Rolle spielt, wer Doppelagent ist und welche 'hidden agendas' da verfolgt werden ist meisterhaft von John le Carre in Szene gesetzt und nur schwer durchschaubar. Spannung pur.

Am Ende kommt die Liebe ins Spiel und alles wird noch um einiges komplizierter. Ob`s ein Happyend gibt wird aber nicht verraten.
Fazit: Für Menschen, die mit dem Begriff 'Kalter Krieg' etwas anzufangen wissen, ein Meisterwerk und ein glasklares Muss. Für alle anderen nicht zwingend empfehlenswert.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Kalter Krieg pur, 6. Januar 2012
Es war ein Versuch, auch einmal ein Buch von John le Carre auf Englisch zu lesen. Der Versuch hat gut geklappt und der Krimi lest sich nahezu problemlos auf Englisch.
Der Leser wird brutal zurückgeführt in die tiefsten Zeiten des kalten Krieges. Ich frage mich ernsthaft, ob Leser, die keinen Bezug zu dieser Zeit mehr haben, das Ganze nicht einfach als reinste, evt. Sogar als unglaubwürdige Fiktion abtun. Dabei darf man nicht vergessen, dass tatsächlich und obendrein viel spioniert wurde ' und vermutlich wird ' zwischen Ost und West. Alle möglichen Tricks wurden angewandt und auch die Agentenaustausch-Aktionen auf der Glienicker Brücke fanden wirklich statt.

Zur Story: Zug um Zug werden britische Agenten in der DDR enttarnt und liquidiert. Nun beginnt ein raffiniertes Agentenspiel um Alec Leamas, den Helden der Geschichte. Nach außen scheint es so, dass er von den Briten abgeschrieben wird, ins Abdachlosenmilieu abschmiert und vom KGB angeworben wird. Wer nun in diesem Spiel welche Rolle spielt, wer Doppelagent ist und welche 'hidden agendas' da verfolgt werden ist meisterhaft von John le Carre in Szene gesetzt und nur schwer durchschaubar. Spannung pur.

Am Ende kommt die Liebe ins Spiel und alles wird noch um einiges komplizierter. Ob`s ein Happyend gibt wird aber nicht verraten.
Fazit: Für Menschen, die mit dem Begriff 'Kalter Krieg' etwas anzufangen wissen, ein Meisterwerk und ein glasklares Muss. Für alle anderen nicht zwingend empfehlenswert.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Kalter Krieg pur, 6. Januar 2012
Es war ein Versuch, auch einmal ein Buch von John le Carre auf Englisch zu lesen. Der Versuch hat gut geklappt und der Krimi lest sich nahezu problemlos auf Englisch.
Der Leser wird brutal zurückgeführt in die tiefsten Zeiten des kalten Krieges. Ich frage mich ernsthaft, ob Leser, die keinen Bezug zu dieser Zeit mehr haben, das Ganze nicht einfach als reinste, evt. Sogar als unglaubwürdige Fiktion abtun. Dabei darf man nicht vergessen, dass tatsächlich und obendrein viel spioniert wurde ' und vermutlich wird ' zwischen Ost und West. Alle möglichen Tricks wurden angewandt und auch die Agentenaustausch-Aktionen auf der Glienicker Brücke fanden wirklich statt.

Zur Story: Zug um Zug werden britische Agenten in der DDR enttarnt und liquidiert. Nun beginnt ein raffiniertes Agentenspiel um Alec Leamas, den Helden der Geschichte. Nach außen scheint es so, dass er von den Briten abgeschrieben wird, ins Abdachlosenmilieu abschmiert und vom KGB angeworben wird. Wer nun in diesem Spiel welche Rolle spielt, wer Doppelagent ist und welche 'hidden agendas' da verfolgt werden ist meisterhaft von John le Carre in Szene gesetzt und nur schwer durchschaubar. Spannung pur.

Am Ende kommt die Liebe ins Spiel und alles wird noch um einiges komplizierter. Ob`s ein Happyend gibt wird aber nicht verraten.
Fazit: Für Menschen, die mit dem Begriff 'Kalter Krieg' etwas anzufangen wissen, ein Meisterwerk und ein glasklares Muss. Für alle anderen nicht zwingend empfehlenswert.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Kalter Krieg pur, 6. Januar 2012
Es war ein Versuch, auch einmal ein Buch von John le Carre auf Englisch zu lesen. Der Versuch hat gut geklappt und der Krimi lest sich nahezu problemlos auf Englisch.
Der Leser wird brutal zurückgeführt in die tiefsten Zeiten des kalten Krieges. Ich frage mich ernsthaft, ob Leser, die keinen Bezug zu dieser Zeit mehr haben, das Ganze nicht einfach als reinste, evt. Sogar als unglaubwürdige Fiktion abtun. Dabei darf man nicht vergessen, dass tatsächlich und obendrein viel spioniert wurde ' und vermutlich wird ' zwischen Ost und West. Alle möglichen Tricks wurden angewandt und auch die Agentenaustausch-Aktionen auf der Glienicker Brücke fanden wirklich statt.

Zur Story: Zug um Zug werden britische Agenten in der DDR enttarnt und liquidiert. Nun beginnt ein raffiniertes Agentenspiel um Alec Leamas, den Helden der Geschichte. Nach außen scheint es so, dass er von den Briten abgeschrieben wird, ins Abdachlosenmilieu abschmiert und vom KGB angeworben wird. Wer nun in diesem Spiel welche Rolle spielt, wer Doppelagent ist und welche 'hidden agendas' da verfolgt werden ist meisterhaft von John le Carre in Szene gesetzt und nur schwer durchschaubar. Spannung pur.

Am Ende kommt die Liebe ins Spiel und alles wird noch um einiges komplizierter. Ob`s ein Happyend gibt wird aber nicht verraten.
Fazit: Für Menschen, die mit dem Begriff 'Kalter Krieg' etwas anzufangen wissen, ein Meisterwerk und ein glasklares Muss. Für alle anderen nicht zwingend empfehlenswert.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Kalter Krieg pur, 6. Januar 2012
Es war ein Versuch, auch einmal ein Buch von John le Carre auf Englisch zu lesen. Der Versuch hat gut geklappt und der Krimi lest sich nahezu problemlos auf Englisch.
Der Leser wird brutal zurückgeführt in die tiefsten Zeiten des kalten Krieges. Ich frage mich ernsthaft, ob Leser, die keinen Bezug zu dieser Zeit mehr haben, das Ganze nicht einfach als reinste, evt. Sogar als unglaubwürdige Fiktion abtun. Dabei darf man nicht vergessen, dass tatsächlich und obendrein viel spioniert wurde ' und vermutlich wird ' zwischen Ost und West. Alle möglichen Tricks wurden angewandt und auch die Agentenaustausch-Aktionen auf der Glienicker Brücke fanden wirklich statt.

Zur Story: Zug um Zug werden britische Agenten in der DDR enttarnt und liquidiert. Nun beginnt ein raffiniertes Agentenspiel um Alec Leamas, den Helden der Geschichte. Nach außen scheint es so, dass er von den Briten abgeschrieben wird, ins Abdachlosenmilieu abschmiert und vom KGB angeworben wird. Wer nun in diesem Spiel welche Rolle spielt, wer Doppelagent ist und welche 'hidden agendas' da verfolgt werden ist meisterhaft von John le Carre in Szene gesetzt und nur schwer durchschaubar. Spannung pur.

Am Ende kommt die Liebe ins Spiel und alles wird noch um einiges komplizierter. Ob`s ein Happyend gibt wird aber nicht verraten.
Fazit: Für Menschen, die mit dem Begriff 'Kalter Krieg' etwas anzufangen wissen, ein Meisterwerk und ein glasklares Muss. Für alle anderen nicht zwingend empfehlenswert.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 2 3 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (Penguin Modern Classics)
The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (Penguin Modern Classics) von John le Carré (Taschenbuch - 29. Juli 2010)
EUR 10,20
Auf Lager.
In den Einkaufswagen Auf meinen Wunschzettel
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen