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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Grass Is Always Greener . . . Someplace Else
My rating of this book is based on the quality of the writing. If I were to rate the book instead for the appropriateness of what is described, I would rate it as a "zero." Before going further, let me mention that this book describes more immorality, lack of consideration, and disgusting behavior than you will read in five usual novels. If such things upset you, this...
Veröffentlicht am 25. Juli 2007 von Donald Mitchell

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3.0 von 5 Sternen You'll dig it if you're beat
Fact-based account of post-war, rebellious intellectuals who embrace poverty and aimlessness in a kinetic quest for drugs, alcohol, sex, jazz, and existential insight. Kerouac was on an extended benzedrine binge for the first draft of this book, and the prose is sometimes disjointed, but the enthusiastic, poetic idealizations of his vagabond experiences make the trip...
Veröffentlicht am 6. Juli 1999 von Ronald St. John


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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Grass Is Always Greener . . . Someplace Else, 25. Juli 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 127,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: On the Road (Penguin Modern Classics) (Taschenbuch)
My rating of this book is based on the quality of the writing. If I were to rate the book instead for the appropriateness of what is described, I would rate it as a "zero." Before going further, let me mention that this book describes more immorality, lack of consideration, and disgusting behavior than you will read in five usual novels. If such things upset you, this book will be a poor choice for you to read.

This autobiographical novel is a paean to the hunger and optimism of youth. Everyone you meet in the book is convinced that something much better lies in the next town, in the next relationship, or in the next hit of "tea." The irony of this is nicely explored through the character of Dean Moriarty (Kerouac's friend, Neil Cassady, in real life) who constantly is adrift among the three women he has married.

The uplifting part of the book is found in the way that things somehow work out for everyone involved, even though they lack resources, insight, and appropriate caution. In their giddy gambles on new experiences, they hit the winning numbers often enough to be able to keep coming back for more. Their rootlessness and commitment to experimentation define them in the same way that the Depression defined their parents.

The brilliance of this book is that although you will probably not approve of the irresponsible lives the characters live, you will find yourself deeply involved with them. You will probably also know how they feel. In one vivid sequence, the bipolar Moriarty recreates a memory by almost crashing the car he is driving . . . just to make his point. In the aftermath, he quicky falls asleep, and someone else has to drive.

Youth can be very manipulative, and Kerouac's male pals certainly exemplify that impulsive weakness. Out of money, they steal, beg, borrow, lie, and do whatever it takes to score some. Then, they will spend whatever they have to last them for weeks on a spree covering just a few hours. Moriarty routinely leaves people in strange cities with no money and no friends, and forgets about them. Another pal marries a woman so he can get her to pay for a cross-country drive. When her money runs out in Arizona, he abandons her.

Kerouac's writing captures all of this in a remarkably vivid way. He has a lust for experiences that makes the world fresh and new. For example, he lovingly describes being a cotton picker, one of the worst jobs available at the time. The descriptions of what it is like to listen to jazz are remarkably effective and will probably attract new fans for years. Unfortunately, he also glamorizes drug usage which will also probably generate a lot of new fans for that, as well.

Road trips are a classic way that young men blow off steam in college. Freed from the restraints of being around those who supervise them, life seems more open and everything is possible. The men in this novel are mostly veterans who can get G.I. bill funds for their education. This can help fund road trips across the country, when the urge to travel hits them, tied to either their sense of being footloose or a vague promise of a bed on the other coast. Even after they marry and begin to raise families, the behavior changes little. These are Peter Pans who have adult responsibilities.

While most of what these people do are things that I do not consider commendable, this book took me back to my youth in very fundamental ways. I recalled each and every one of my "conservative" road trips with great relish and delight. I hadn't thought about them in years. I suspect that this book will be a "youth drug" for making you feel like a teenager again, too.

After you have enjoyed the great writing and the reminiscences that the book inspires, I suggest that you think about the exemplary things you did as a young person. How can you share those experiences with others in ways that will inspire them to want to serve goodness in the same ways?

Be open to life's potential . . . and be prepared to help enhance it with your responsible participation.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Fast Paced, Stream of Consciousness Writing, Fantastic!, 13. März 2009
Von 
James Gallen (St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: On the Road (Taschenbuch)
"The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes "Awww!"

This was my first introduction to Jack Kerouac. I found this book to be fantastic! For those like me who have heard of Kerouac and "On The Road" but really do not know what it is about I will provide a brief synopsis without giving too much away. It is the story of Sal Paradise (substitute for Kerouac) and his friend, Dean Moriarty (modeled on Kerouac's friend) and their late 1940s cross country searches for "it", music, sex, liquor...life, as they know it.

Those who have read my other reviews may be surprised at my gushing praise for this classic of the Beat Generation. The life style described in this book is, in my opinion, utterly disgusting. What makes this book great, to my taste, is the writing style. It is a fast paced, stream of consciousness description of totally irresponsible, hedonistic behavior. I would not recommend this life style to anyone but I do recommend the book to any fan of great writing with the maturity to avoid the siren call to take to the road.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen "Let's start the car and blow some air!" (Sal), 27. Mai 2013
Rezension bezieht sich auf: On the Road (Penguin Modern Classics) (Taschenbuch)
To enable his frenetic continuous typing, Jack Kerouac simply scotch-taped several sheets of tracing paper together, creating a 120-foot-long roll he fed into his type writer - not as some critics would have it, a roll of Teletype-paper. The entire scroll consists indeed of one single paragraph, written single-spaced, and giving the real names of the protagonists in the published novel. The scroll was auctioned off by the Kerouac estate for $2.4 million in 2001 to Jim Irsay (owner of the football team Indianapolis Colts), who makes it available for public viewing.

The novel is set in 1947, although it was written in 1950. Neal Cassady and Jack Kerouac (Dean Moriarty and Sal Paradise in the book) started their 1800 miles drive to Mexico City to visit William Burroughs. Kerouac compares the narrative as a specific era in jazz history, "somewhere between its Charlie Parker Ornithology period and another period that began with Miles Davis." The narrative begins in New York, passes Chicago and drives across the continent to San Francisco, where Sal takes a job as a night watchman at a boarding house for merchant sailors. But he is soon on the road again.

The "civilized" world he’d left behind was gripped in Cold War paranoia under the impression of the Korean War, the U.S. had built the hydrogen bomb and Kerouac was depressed and convinced he might as well die. But high on grass, bouncing along Mexican roads, he experienced a happy hallucination: a microburst of gold shot from the sky right into his startled eyes. This was the moment, he later wrote, that at last made On the Road possible, the "great Occasion" when he had the vision that Dean was God, and God had the face of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the hero who had saved the world from oppression and slavery. Small wonder that to Kerouac this seemed “the most pleasant and graceful trip in the world.

When Dean and Sal reached the La Mexica, they encountered thousands of hipsters in floppy straw hats and long- lapeled jackets, some of them selling crucifixes and weed in the alleys and Mambo blared from everywhere. They found an apartment close to Bill and Joan Burroughs, who had fled the U.S. after Bill’s last drug bust and was writing one of the classic confessional novels of Beat literature. But Mexico City developed into a disaster and soon Sal found himself at loose ends, stayed stoned, smoking fifteen joints a day, and helped himself to Bill’s morphine. After another hallucination in which he saw himself as the saintly hero and prophetic author of On the Road, he left Mexico just one month later and began walking to New York, occasionally hitching a ride. Despite the pain and heartbreak of his misadventure, On the Road was taking shape in his soul.

It is this long trip across half a continent to Mexico City with Dean that can be interpreted as Sal’s last attempt at finding an answer to his problems. The novel comes to a close a year later in New York, where Dean recommends to move to San Francisco, however that doesn’t work and Dean returns to the West alone. The novel ends with Sal sitting on a New York pier during sunset, contemplating God, America, crying children, and closing with "I think of Dean Moriarty, I even think of Old Dean Moriarty the father we never found, I think of Dean Moriarty."

Jack Kerouac’s life in New York turned out to be as tumultuous as his stay in Mexico, but in 1951, the book took its final form as an ode to Neal Cassady. However, Kerouac had a long and difficult time finding a publisher. His experimental writing style and sympathies towards minorities made many edtors highly uncomfortable, in post-War America. Graphic descriptions of drug-use and homosexual behavior could even provoke obscenity charges. Finally the book was published in 1957 by Viking and created a sensation and hasn’t lost it’s faszination even today.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen You'll dig it if you're beat, 6. Juli 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: On the Road (Taschenbuch)
Fact-based account of post-war, rebellious intellectuals who embrace poverty and aimlessness in a kinetic quest for drugs, alcohol, sex, jazz, and existential insight. Kerouac was on an extended benzedrine binge for the first draft of this book, and the prose is sometimes disjointed, but the enthusiastic, poetic idealizations of his vagabond experiences make the trip worthwhile.
One is reminded of Cannery Row in observing the characters' dreamy intentions and the comically alcoholic results, except that Steinbeck was aware of his characters' absurdity while Kerouac takes himself and his drug-addled companions way too seriously. Kerouac unintentionally mocks the real life poverty of those he encounters on the road by the fact he is supported by the GI Bill and his mommy (oh, excuse me, his "aunt").
Before you decide to imitate Kerouac, be sure you've got a generous "aunt", and be advised that in real life the gone cat burned out his liver and died at 47. Yes, yes, yes, yes, uh, oops.
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1.0 von 5 Sternen Readable piece of trash, 9. April 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: On the Road (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Just as modern art is a collection of talentless folk, the "Beat Generation" (Kerouac, Burroughs, Ginsberg etc.) is largely void of any literary talent. "On the Road" is an important book, however. It opened the door to the literary and artsy world to the mediocre, weird and foolish. What Warhol did for the art world, Kerouac did for the literary world. Peck at your typewriter, type anything that comes into your head and ignore trite things like plot, character development and transcendent thought. Why is there so little serious fiction today? Read this book, remember how profound it was regarded by the intelligensia and you will realize how far serious fiction has dropped- from Hemingway, Faulkner, Cather and Steinbeck to Kerouac and Ginsberg to Tom Clancy and John Grisham and Deepack Chopak.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen I guess I dig it, 21. Juli 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: On the Road (Taschenbuch)
I read this book because of its outstanding reputation, and the amazingly cool guy Kerouac is supposed to be. the characters in the story have a lot of fun, they get drunk, they have "green tea" and they are all psychotic (not a bad thing in this case) but they have no direction...and I guess thats the point of the story--to have no worries, but its too unreal. by the end of the story I was getting angry at all the characters fer their lack of any regard for their actions (i. e. one was like twenty and had zillions of kids across the country). One very good thing about it is its accurate and rich portrayal of the Beat generation. The coolest thing about this book is the inspiration it gives to leave everything grab ten bucks and go to New York to get a job as a parking lot attendant :)
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Grass Is Always Greener . . . Someplace Else, 25. Juli 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 127,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
My rating of this book is based on the quality of the writing. If I were to rate the book instead for the appropriateness of what is described, I would rate it as a "zero." Before going further, let me mention that this book describes more immorality, lack of consideration, and disgusting behavior than you will read in five usual novels. If such things upset you, this book will be a poor choice for you to read.

This autobiographical novel is a paean to the hunger and optimism of youth. Everyone you meet in the book is convinced that something much better lies in the next town, in the next relationship, or in the next hit of "tea." The irony of this is nicely explored through the character of Dean Moriarty (Kerouac's friend, Neil Cassady, in real life) who constantly is adrift among the three women he has married.

The uplifting part of the book is found in the way that things somehow work out for everyone involved, even though they lack resources, insight, and appropriate caution. In their giddy gambles on new experiences, they hit the winning numbers often enough to be able to keep coming back for more. Their rootlessness and commitment to experimentation define them in the same way that the Depression defined their parents.

The brilliance of this book is that although you will probably not approve of the irresponsible lives the characters live, you will find yourself deeply involved with them. You will probably also know how they feel. In one vivid sequence, the bipolar Moriarty recreates a memory by almost crashing the car he is driving . . . just to make his point. In the aftermath, he quicky falls asleep, and someone else has to drive.

Youth can be very manipulative, and Kerouac's male pals certainly exemplify that impulsive weakness. Out of money, they steal, beg, borrow, lie, and do whatever it takes to score some. Then, they will spend whatever they have to last them for weeks on a spree covering just a few hours. Moriarty routinely leaves people in strange cities with no money and no friends, and forgets about them. Another pal marries a woman so he can get her to pay for a cross-country drive. When her money runs out in Arizona, he abandons her.

Kerouac's writing captures all of this in a remarkably vivid way. He has a lust for experiences that makes the world fresh and new. For example, he lovingly describes being a cotton picker, one of the worst jobs available at the time. The descriptions of what it is like to listen to jazz are remarkably effective and will probably attract new fans for years. Unfortunately, he also glamorizes drug usage which will also probably generate a lot of new fans for that, as well.

Road trips are a classic way that young men blow off steam in college. Freed from the restraints of being around those who supervise them, life seems more open and everything is possible. The men in this novel are mostly veterans who can get G.I. bill funds for their education. This can help fund road trips across the country, when the urge to travel hits them, tied to either their sense of being footloose or a vague promise of a bed on the other coast. Even after they marry and begin to raise families, the behavior changes little. These are Peter Pans who have adult responsibilities.

While most of what these people do are things that I do not consider commendable, this book took me back to my youth in very fundamental ways. I recalled each and every one of my "conservative" road trips with great relish and delight. I hadn't thought about them in years. I suspect that this book will be a "youth drug" for making you feel like a teenager again, too.

After you have enjoyed the great writing and the reminiscences that the book inspires, I suggest that you think about the exemplary things you did as a young person. How can you share those experiences with others in ways that will inspire them to want to serve goodness in the same ways?

Be open to life's potential . . . and be prepared to help enhance it with your responsible participation.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen how it is (the book), 5. Juli 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: On the Road (Taschenbuch)
Gonna try and keep it short. I read most of the reviews here, and some were negative, and there seemed to be an obvious similarity to them all. They were either mindless resentment(no offense), Or it was a lack of fully understanding what happened. This book was not a journal made on a drunken whim, but a story that took seven years to develop. Now when anyone spends a span of time like that, you know that they are going to be able to accomplish a feat like using the one large roll of paper to complete the novel. Also, to some this story seemed like the people were unchanging and lacked any development as the story prgressed without any sort of concrete ending, thats the idea, the characters are on a quest for the unattainable, like the knights of the round table searching for the holy grail with no avail whatsoever. "Road" is more than an isolated novel, but an installment of an ongoing epic! Finally, the characters seem seedy and sort of bad cos they are, they are human beings, they wallow in the filth like pigs should, they have an uncontrolable urge not burn their tender flesh in the hot sun like the culture surrounding them. And Kerouac, to some seems like the loser tagging along with the hip crowd because he was, Kerouac was an insecure outsider that tried to fit into something that he could somewhat be a part of, not to impress others, but to feel love from mankind. I could cover more ground on this subject, and strike at all the condecending points people try to make at this masterpiece, but it would waste everybodys time, so just enjoy this book, not with any sort of trend, philosophy, or any literary clout surrounding it , but with the love and compassion that this man, like many urned to express in the cold, timid, time these characters lived in. So just read, enjoy, and if the writing style is not your taste, then try to look at it for what it is, a cry for freedom and a want for something that is non existent. OPEN YOUR MIND AND LOSE YOURSELF FOR A WHILE/ IF YOU CAN
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5.0 von 5 Sternen It's The Beat To Keep !, 17. Mai 2000
my shrink gave me a copy of this book when i was coming to terms with the rejection of a rah-rah girl i spent a whole year chasing, a father who couldn't understand what it meant for me to be a writer, and a society that had no love for free spirits...i read it when i was a junior in college, then i actually did some traveling; i went to san francisco, right after a rotten semsester, just so i could check out the north beach area that jack referred to so fondly...i saw it and chinatown, and washington square, and city lights bookstore, the ghost of bob kaufman and ate chinese food and met wild beautiful crazy unapologetic souls along the way who were just trying to find their niche in this life, just like sal and dean. last year, i came out to san francisco, with two bags carrying all my poessions,my savings and brass balls, beacuse i always wanted to be here, to chase a dream...people who trash kerouac will never get the gist of what he was getting at; that there had to be more to america than picket fences, 9 to fives,raising rugrats, and slaving for a paycheck...i'm not saying that being a free spirit is glamorous and romantic,when i came to sf, i didn't have enough to get a room, i stayed in a shelter a couple of months. eventually i found a place and a job, because i wanted to be here, to write in san francisco. this book didnt offer any easy solutions(it wasn't meant to !) but it did show me that there were people like me out there that wanted to be happy on their own terms...its not for everyone, but then again, neither is John Coltrane's sweet poetry pouring from a saxophone... trane wasn't crazy and neither was jack...they just had their own way of looking at the world... i wonder if the rah rah girl still thinks about me, of if she became a trophy wife? as for kim in chicago,stop reading excrement like camus and get a life!...Thank you Jack. whereever you are
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5.0 von 5 Sternen It's The Beat To Keep !, 17. Mai 2000
my shrink gave me a copy of this book when i was coming to terms with the rejection of a rah-rah girl i spent a whole year chasing, a father who couldn't understand what it meant for me to be a writer, and a society that had no love for free spirits...i read it when i was a junior in college, then i actually did some traveling; i went to san francisco, right after a rotten semsester, just so i could check out the north beach area that jack referred to so fondly...i saw it and chinatown, and washington square, and city lights bookstore, the ghost of bob kaufman and ate chinese food and met wild beautiful crazy unapologetic souls along the way who were just trying to find their niche in this life, just like sal and dean. last year, i came out to san francisco, with two bags carrying all my poessions,my savings and brass balls, beacuse i always wanted to be here, to chase a dream...people who trash kerouac will never get the gist of what he was getting at; that there had to be more to america than picket fences, 9 to fives,raising rugrats, and slaving for a paycheck...i'm not saying that being a free spirit is glamorous and romantic,when i came to sf, i didn't have enough to get a room, i stayed in a shelter a couple of months. eventually i found a place and a job, because i wanted to be here, to write in san francisco. this book didnt offer any easy solutions(it wasn't meant to !) but it did show me that there were people like me out that wanted to be happy on their own terms...its not for everyone, but then again, neither is John Coltrane's sweet poetry pouring from a saxophone... trane wasn't crazy and neither was jack...they just had their own way of looking at the world... i wonder if the rah rah girl still thinks about me, of if she became a trophy wife? as for kim in chicago,stop reading excrement like camus and get a life!...Thank you Jack. whereever you are.
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