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How Buildings Learn: What Happens After They're Built
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 11. Mai 1999
This book, while it has nothing to do with software, has everything to do with the nature of complex systems - which means, of course, that it has everything to do with software. Every software engineer and systems architect I've shared this book with has immediately recognized the content for the allegory that it is. Were Brand to simply replace 'Building' with 'System' throughout the book, he'd make a mint in the software industry. I introduce software people to this book by handing them a well-worn copy and asking them to comment and argue in the margins. It has spawned an epiphany of content. It, "The Design of Everyday Things," and "The Fifth Discipline" will be manditory reading in my shop. Oh, the book might have something to say about buildings, too.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
I've hesitated to review this book because I'm personally suspicious of glowing praise. However, this book deserves it. Brand's starting point is the observation that most architects spend most of their time re-working or extending existing buildings, rather than creating new ones from scratch, but the subject of how buildings change (or, to adopt Brand's metaphor, how buildings learn from their use and environment) is ignored by most architectural schools and theorists. By looking at examples (big and small, ancient and modern), Brand teases out patterns of re-use and change, and argues (very convincingly) that since buildings are going to be modified many times, they should be designed with unanticipated future changes in mind. Of course, the same is true of programs, and I found again and again that I could substitute the word "program" for "building", and "programmer" for "architect", everything Brand said was true of computing as well (but much better written than any software engineering polemic I've ever read).
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am 27. Mai 1999
I've learned a lot from Brand's commonsensical, and in some ways, humanist approach. The delight he takes in the messy business of human life is exemplary. However, he sets up a false opposition - there's no real conflict between buildings which adapt and flow with change, and the grandeur of enlightenment monumentalism. The latter will undoubtedly benefit from paying more attention to flexibility, but needn't completely pack its bags in the process. I'm just back from the Sky Garden in Osaka - really, there's nothing Brand's wider philosophy could approve of in such a modernist temple, but it embodies aspects of humanity that an avowedly low-key architecture never could. For all that, HBL should be compulsory reading for all kinds of designers and engineers. Cheers!
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am 10. Mai 1999
This book is now essential reading for all potential builders on the 70 house-site Rosneath Farm. We are using Stewart's concept of the "high road", with Pattern Language, to build houses and othe village buildings that will last for hundreds of years. We have bylaws avoiding the "No-Road" - which is to do with the dominance of the visual appearance of the skin of the building over function and coherence. I was delighted to see Chatsworth House as one of the examples of "High Road", as I had already planned to visit there in June. A very useful book.
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am 8. Juli 1998
Until reading this book (which I have only half devoured so far), my idea of preservation was returning a structure to its appearance as originally built. Brand makes a thoroughly persuasive argument for allowing buildings to retain those alterations they colllect over the years. The text is straight forward, engaging, the time progression pictures are fascinating. Overall, among my few favorite books about architecture, preservation, or human adaptability. Excellent.
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am 16. Februar 1997
This book is one of my required texts for my master's degree in historic preservation. Preservationists are often overly concerned with restoring buildings to a specific period and this book should change their minds! The concept of a building as a living breathing CHANGING entity is something that anyone involved with buildings should take to heart. Brand's book is well written and easy to read, and anyone who has ever been in love with a building should read it
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1 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 22. Mai 2000
I read this book after reading several books by Christopher Alexander. I'd heard that Brand was inspired by Alexander's work, and I was pleased to find that Brand makes his own quite original contribution to the study of what makes buildings work -- and how we change buildings to make them work better.
After reading this book, I gave a talk to my student housing co-op based on what Brand taught me. I began to think about the co-op buildings as "living things," and indeed, looking back only a year, I realized how much we had changed at the co-op: we had installed new windows (to be compliant with the fire code, plus they gave better soundproofing against noisy courtyard parties); we had added emergency lights to our hallways; replaced carpet; installed new locks to keep interlopers out. All these changes worked to subtly transform the environment, and over the course of a decade, the "same old building" has become a quite different place. Brand provides ample photographs, anecdotes, and theories to show how this happens.
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0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 24. Februar 2000
When ever a walk in to a building or room, I will often think "WHY! " Why do I have to stand on the toilet to close the door, Why is this place so out of touch with reality, has the person who designed this place ever steped foot in here.
I first picked this book up over a year ago after seeing the TV program. It is a very good book and like everyone says it is common sence. Or is it, It does not seem to be commen sence to most architects.
I thought architecture was as taught in this book, but my elusions where shattered, it seems architects just want to fit in, or thay want there building to look good to a viewer sitting in another building staring at the photograph on the front cover of a magazine.
I have also wondered about software architecture, and am just starting to see the connections. I have just read some reviews of Christopher Alexander books and will be reading them as well.
An excelent book, style could be better. 4/5
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