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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Space that Separates: The Two Sides of Conflict
Why would anyone want to read a novel about unending drunken revels by emotional cripples who treat each other badly, never-ending love conflicts, getting excited by mayhem at the running of the bulls and during bull fights in Pamplona, and wasted lives? That's the question posed by this book.

The book will not draw too many readers for the subject matter. Why...
Veröffentlicht am 30. Januar 2007 von Donald Mitchell

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3.0 von 5 Sternen The 20th century "condition."
One of the most striking features of this novel is the bland superficiality of the characters. I found that I did not particularly like any of them, and that dampened my appreciation of the story.
The book is about a sort of competition for the lady Brett Ashley. She enjoys using men as her playtoys and delights in their chase after her. The persona from whose...
Veröffentlicht am 16. Juli 2000 von D. Roberts


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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Space that Separates: The Two Sides of Conflict, 30. Januar 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises (Arrow Classic) (Taschenbuch)
Why would anyone want to read a novel about unending drunken revels by emotional cripples who treat each other badly, never-ending love conflicts, getting excited by mayhem at the running of the bulls and during bull fights in Pamplona, and wasted lives? That's the question posed by this book.

The book will not draw too many readers for the subject matter. Why then does the book attract? Part of the appeal has to be the same reason that many people like horror films -- the relief you feel when you realize that your own life does not encounter such dangers can be profound.

Another reason to read this book is to understand the disillusionment of the American expatriates in Europe after World War I. The book is a period piece in this sense. Clearly, Hemingway is Jake and the book is undoubtedly very autobiographical. All first novels have that quality to some degree. Imagining how the author of The Old Man and the Sea started out as Jake was very interesting to me.

To me, however, the primary reason for reading this book is to encounter the remarkable structure that Hemingway built in his plot. He has created several different lenses through which we can explore the role of conflict and separation in our lives. Each lens turns out to be looking at the same object, and it is only by slowly focusing each of the lenses that we are able to see that object more clearly.

The central figure in the book is Brett, Lady Ashley, who enchants almost every man she meets, and who disengages from intimate relations with each one after permanently entangling him emotionally. That leaves a string of wounded suitors in her wake, including Jake. Things get tough when several of them join her and her fiance in Pamplona for the running of the bulls. The symmetry in the book becomes more obvious during a fishing trip that Jake takes without Brett. The fish are lured by artificial flies more successfully than with real worms. Brett's exotic appeal draws men in like flies, much more than the attractions of women who want to make an emotional commitment.

The symmetry becomes masterful when we reach the bull fights. Brett and the matador are inevitably attracted, for they are the same. They both play with their opponents (men and bulls) by flirting and using their capes, weaken the opponents in the engagement, and bring the opponents down (through sexual entrancement and slaughter). Hemingway makes this abundantly clear by repeatedly describing the bull's death as when the matador and the bull become one. One pet name for Brett is Circe, to help complete the picture.

The closer the matador comes to the bull's horns (or Brett to making a commitment), the better the sport for the spectators and the greater the self-esteem for the matador (and Brett).

I do not recall a novel that does such an excellent job of using multiple story lines to reinforce the book's main point, in this case that alienation transcends even closeness. Much as you will dislike some of the characters, the unnecessary racial and ethnic slurs, the savageness, and the emotional scenes, you will probably find the characters to ring true. You will also admire the misguided optimism and honest commitment of Jake as he fulfills his love for Brett by procuring men for her and then rescuing her when the next engagement is all over. Jake's love is that noble sacrifice that we all admire in lovers.

And that's the beautiful part of the book -- you will find nobility amid the ugliness. The contrast makes the nobility more beautiful.

When you are done reading the book, examine your own life and see where you draw back from closeness. Then, ask yourself why you do, and what it costs you and others. Next, consider what closeness can bring from continuing relationships.

Find beauty wherever you look!
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4.0 von 5 Sternen A perfect example of American Modernism., 6. Dezember 2001
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises (Arrow Classic) (Taschenbuch)
Set in the flamboyant twenties, Hemingway's Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises switches from the raving parties and heavy drinking of urban Paris to the rural splendour of the Spanish mainland and the bloody spectacle of the bull fights. The emotionally charged friction, which sparks as personalities clash amongst a small group of expatriates, is mirrored by the intense passion emanating from the contest between man and beast.
The author portrays with remarkable but nonetheless efficacious simplicity the struggle between mankind and nature, between animal and human existence. Furthermore, Hemingway's novel characterises the mundane and materialistic essence of European post-war society, lucidly exhibiting the lost generation's repugnance of a world obsessed with wealth and devoid of idealism.
Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises marks a milestone in the career of one of America's most eminent writers. The novel serves as a perfect example of American modernist fiction.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Space that Separates: The Two Sides of Conflict, 30. Januar 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Sun Also Rises (Taschenbuch)
Why would anyone want to read a novel about unending drunken revels by emotional cripples who treat each other badly, never-ending love conflicts, getting excited by mayhem at the running of the bulls and during bull fights in Pamplona, and wasted lives? That's the question posed by this book.

The book will not draw too many readers for the subject matter. Why then does the book attract? Part of the appeal has to be the same reason that many people like horror films -- the relief you feel when you realize that your own life does not encounter such dangers can be profound.

Another reason to read this book is to understand the disillusionment of the American expatriates in Europe after World War I. The book is a period piece in this sense. Clearly, Hemingway is Jake and the book is undoubtedly very autobiographical. All first novels have that quality to some degree. Imagining how the author of The Old Man and the Sea started out as Jake was very interesting to me.

To me, however, the primary reason for reading this book is to encounter the remarkable structure that Hemingway built in his plot. He has created several different lenses through which we can explore the role of conflict and separation in our lives. Each lens turns out to be looking at the same object, and it is only by slowly focusing each of the lenses that we are able to see that object more clearly.

The central figure in the book is Brett, Lady Ashley, who enchants almost every man she meets, and who disengages from intimate relations with each one after permanently entangling him emotionally. That leaves a string of wounded suitors in her wake, including Jake. Things get tough when several of them join her and her fiance in Pamplona for the running of the bulls. The symmetry in the book becomes more obvious during a fishing trip that Jake takes without Brett. The fish are lured by artificial flies more successfully than with real worms. Brett's exotic appeal draws men in like flies, much more than the attractions of women who want to make an emotional commitment.

The symmetry becomes masterful when we reach the bull fights. Brett and the matador are inevitably attracted, for they are the same. They both play with their opponents (men and bulls) by flirting and using their capes, weaken the opponents in the engagement, and bring the opponents down (through sexual entrancement and slaughter). Hemingway makes this abundantly clear by repeatedly describing the bull's death as when the matador and the bull become one. One pet name for Brett is Circe, to help complete the picture.

The closer the matador comes to the bull's horns (or Brett to making a commitment), the better the sport for the spectators and the greater the self-esteem for the matador (and Brett).

I do not recall a novel that does such an excellent job of using multiple story lines to reinforce the book's main point, in this case that alienation transcends even closeness. Much as you will dislike some of the characters, the unnecessary racial and ethnic slurs, the savageness, and the emotional scenes, you will probably find the characters to ring true. You will also admire the misguided optimism and honest commitment of Jake as he fulfills his love for Brett by procuring men for her and then rescuing her when the next engagement is all over. Jake's love is that noble sacrifice that we all admire in lovers.

And that's the beautiful part of the book -- you will find nobility amid the ugliness. The contrast makes the nobility more beautiful.

When you are done reading the book, examine your own life and see where you draw back from closeness. Then, ask yourself why you do, and what it costs you and others. Next, consider what closeness can bring from continuing relationships.

Find beauty wherever you look!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Space that Separates: The Two Sides of Conflict, 19. September 2000
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
Why would anyone want to read a novel about unending drunken revels by emotional cripples who treat each other badly, never-ending love conflicts, getting excited by mayhem at the running of the bulls and during bull fights in Pamplona, and wasted lives? That's the question posed by this book.
The book will not draw too many readers for the subject matter. Why then does the book attract? Part of the appeal has to be the same reason that many people like horror films -- the relief you feel when you realize that your own life does not encounter such dangers can be profound.
Another reason to read this book is to understand the disillusionment of the American expatriates in Europe after World War I. The book is a period piece in this sense. Clearly, Hemingway is Jake and the book is undoubtedly very autobiographical. All first novels have that quality to some degree. Imagining how the author of The Old Man and the Sea started out as Jake was very interesting to me.
To me, however, the primary reason for reading this book is to encounter the remarkable structure that Hemingway built in his plot. He has created several different lenses through which we can explore the role of conflict and separation in our lives. Each lens turns out to be looking at the same object, and it is only by slowly focusing each of the lenses that we are able to see that object more clearly.
The central figure in the book is Brett, Lady Ashley, who enchants almost every man she meets, and who disengages from intimate relations with each one after permanently entangling him emotionally. That leaves a string of wounded suitors in her wake, including Jake. Things get tough when several of them join her and her fiance in Pamplona for the running of the bulls. The symmetry in the book becomes more obvious during a fishing trip that Jake takes without Brett. The fish are lured by artificial flies more successfully than with real worms. Brett's exotic appeal draws men in like flies, much more than the attractions of women who want to make an emotional commitment.
The symmetry becomes masterful when we reach the bull fights. Brett and the matador are inevitably attracted, for they are the same. They both play with their opponents (men and bulls) by flirting and using their capes, weaken the opponents in the engagement, and bring the opponents down (through sexual entrancement and slaughter). Hemingway makes this abundantly clear by repeatedly describing the bull's death as when the matador and the bull become one. One pet name for Brett is Circe, to help complete the picture.
The closer the matador comes to the bull's horns (or Brett to making a commitment), the better the sport for the spectators and the greater the self-esteem for the matador (and Brett).
I do not recall a novel that does such an excellent job of using multiple story lines to reinforce the book's main point, in this case that alienation transcends even closeness. Much as you will dislike some of the characters, the unnecessary racial and ethnic slurs, the savageness, and the emotional scenes, you will probably find the characters to ring true. You will also admire the misguided optimism and honest commitment of Jake as he fulfills his love for Brett by procuring men for her and then rescuing her when the next engagement is all over. Jake's love is that noble sacrifice that we all admire in lovers.
And that's the beautiful part of the book -- you will find nobility amid the ugliness. The contrast makes the nobility more beautiful.
When you are done reading the book, examine your own life and see where you draw back from closeness. Then, ask yourself why you do, and what it costs you and others. Next, consider what closeness can bring from continuing relationships.
Find beauty wherever you look!
Donald Mitchell (donmitch@irresistibleforces.com)
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3.0 von 5 Sternen The 20th century "condition.", 16. Juli 2000
Von 
D. Roberts "Hadrian12" (Battle Creek, Michigan United States) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Sun Also Rises (Taschenbuch)
One of the most striking features of this novel is the bland superficiality of the characters. I found that I did not particularly like any of them, and that dampened my appreciation of the story.
The book is about a sort of competition for the lady Brett Ashley. She enjoys using men as her playtoys and delights in their chase after her. The persona from whose point of view the story is told is Jake Barnes. The rest of the characters are unremarkable and are mostly only memorable for their blandness.
We go from France to the bullfighting performances in Spain & there are fascinating allusions to the matador / bull relationship being akin to courtship and sexual intercourse between a man and woman. Images of impotence and castration abound and are made all the more significant as Jake can no longer sexually "perform" due to a wartime injury.
This book is certainly not for everyone. I am glad I read it & would recommend it as an important 20th century literary work (even though I did not especially enjoy it myself). It is not so different from the apathetic landscape of T.S. Eliot's poem "The Wasteland"; a world in which it is thought that feeling nothing at all is preferable to feeling pain. But nothing could be more horrifying than a notion such as that....
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Adventurous Read with travel, bull fighting, and mind games, 1. Juni 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Sun Also Rises (Taschenbuch)
Hemingway makes you want to call up a bunch of buddies and hit sidewalk cafe after cafe ordering good food and drink. He makes these things seem like true life pleasures in the way he describes them. I can't say I did not like the book. There is no real plot, but the adventure Hemingway takes you on makes up for it. I disliked most of the characters which simply means that Hemingway did a great job making them real. Brett Ashley is the most despicable character I've ever read about. Her manipulation and mind games are painted so well by Hemingway that you want her to be real so you can tell her off. She really angered me. All this means is that if a character in a book can anger you, than the author has done his job making the character come to life. It took me awhile to come to terms that I liked this book. I first thought I hated it. When I saw myself constantly talking about the characters to friends, I realized that I really liked the book. I would suggest that it be read by everyone who wants to be wisked away to Spain during the running of the bulls, see a bull fight, and be taken to sidewalk cafes to drink and be merry. Great book! Short read. Read it!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Read The Book, Run With The Bulls, 24. Juni 1998
Thank God for Paris and Spain and Hemingway. Read this story. You'll forget you're reading. You see Jake. You see Cohn with his broken nose. You see Brett in that sweater and your heart breaks. You see Pedro and the bull fight.
The problem is the number of people that now make their living giving their opinions about this book. Don't get caught up with what your high school teacher said, or deconstructionist professor said, or literary know-it-all, could-have-wrote-it-better said. Don't get caught up with all the journals and theses and textbooks that say it is not as well planned as "Across The River And Through the Trees," or a good beginning point for a literary mind, or that real people or real events are incorporated into the plot. Don't wander around in the "lost generation" crap or expatriated American garbage, or the impotence and what Freud would say and the myriad of other things that make people spout off Epicurean/Stoic history or analogies to the nth degree. Don't get sidetracked by the yappers who want to tell you what to think. If the yappers force themselves on you, merely respond "Isn't it nice to think so." The ones who know better will understand and be embarrassed, the ones who just can't get it will keep on yapping.
Just read the story and run with the bulls.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen An Important Part of the Twentieth Century Mindscape., 20. Juli 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Sun Also Rises (Taschenbuch)
Hemingway captures the disillusionment of a generation jilted by the Great War. He captures the nuances, feel, and attitude of this "Lost Generation." This is a piece which captures the mind set of a people after the most signifigant event in modern history. But this is not just a chronicle. Hemingway's sentences are so simple yet when deciphered (even blurbs of dialouge that don't play with the scene or theme) we come to realize earthly truths from every color of the spectrum of life.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Lost Generation and Anti-Semitism, 20. Juli 2000
Von 
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Sun Also Rises (Taschenbuch)
This book with its austere prose style is good read, and it's clear to me that Hemmingway, then 27 years old, shows tremendous talent. The scenes involving the fishing and the bullfighting are very evocative, and the dialogue interesting. The understatement or non-statement (Hemmingway's iceberg approach to writing) works very well in this, his first book that brought him to national attention. In that regard, the horrors of World War I constitute those parts of the iceberg that lie beneath the water, and influence the emptiness of the social life that is above. The "what might have been" conversation between Jake and Brett (who both love each other, but who both know the hopelessness of that love) at the end of the book is particularly touching.
Notwithstanding the above, none of the characters have much for the reader to be attracted to. A constant never-ending stream of alcohol seems to flow through the book. It's incredible that people can drink as much as the principal characters in the book do. Then there's Brett, the 34 year old woman, who has Jake loving her (and she loves him), is engaged to Mike, has an affair with Robert Cohn (who also loves her), and in the end, seemingly out of the blue, takes off and seduces the 19 year old bullfighter, Pedro Romero. Try to figure that out.
Also, I want to comment on what I consider to be an uncomfortable excess of anti-semitic sentiment in this book. Consider this exchange between Jake and Bill about Brett on p. 230 of the paperback Scribner edition (1954).
--"She hasn't any money with her?" I asked --"I shouldn't think so. She never has any money. She gets five hundred quid a year and pays three hundred and fifty of it in interest to Jews." --"I supppose they get it at the source," said Bill. --"Quite. They're not really Jews. We just call them Jews. They're Scotsmen, I believe."
Of course, the heart of the anti-semitism in this book is the way the characters relate to Robert Cohn. Some of it can be chalked up to jealousy, particularly as Cohn had had an affair with Brett, and Jake, who loves Brett, is sexually crippled because of his war injuries. But almost all of the principal characters, not just Jake, take pleasure in continually deriding Cohn's Jewishness to his face, to each other, or just in their mental, often alcohol-induced lucubrations. The references occur all too often throughout the book, e.g., there's Jake, saying that Cohn had a "hard, Jewish, stubborn streak," p. 10, Bill [on Cohn] at p. 162, "[h]e's got this Jewish superiority so strong that he thinks the only emotion he'll get out of the fight will be being bored" and Mike, "Take that sad Jewish face away, p. 177 . . . etcetera, etcetera, etcetera. I realize that times change. I don't believe we should judge books from an earlier generation by today's standards of political correctness. Nonetheless, the characters in this book are often mean-spirited, and excessively anti-semetic without, in my view, an adequately compensating literary justification (which in the context of the holocaust to come a mere decade latter, should give pause). For whatever it's worth, in A Moveable Feast (a description of his life in Paris in the 1920s), the most generous portrait in that book is to the renowned poet (though fascist sympathizer) Ezra Pound.
Perhaps, World War I had gutted the soul, and that explains the Gertrude Stein quote, that Hemmingway uses to preface the book, "You are all a lost generation." But maybe the excuse is too easy.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Needs a second read, 12. Juli 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Sun Also Rises (Taschenbuch)
I agree with the remarks of the reviewer a few spaces down- this could have been a wonderful short story or novella. I also kept wondering where the story was. Now, if you've read my review of The Great Gatsby, you know that I do not demand a "plot" so to speak, but still... I was left wondering where the beginning and the end were, and what they signified.
I did enjoy the descriptions of Spain and bullfighting (I read this on a couple of hot days on my hammock with a few Coronas:) The descriptions of the bullfights, in addition to being vivid, are accurate. If anyone has ever read the works of Prosper Merimee (colomba, carmen), specifically his Lettres d'Espagne-- Les Courses de Taureaux, you will enjoy the passages in Spain in Hemingway's book.
After I had finished reading and had time to digest what had occurred, I felt better about The Sun Also Rises, but I still feel the need to read it again. One thing that has always bothered me about Hemingway, however, was his anti-Semitism...
By the way, can anyone fully explain the meaning of the title?
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