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8 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Charting a path...
I first read M. Scott Peck's 'The Road Less Travelled' over 20 years ago, but it is a text to which I return again and again, as Peck's insights and observations remain a constant source of inspiration and guidance in my life. It still finds a ready home in the hands of therapists, counselors, ministers, teachers, career planners, and others as part of their resources,...
Veröffentlicht am 10. Februar 2006 von FrKurt Messick

versus
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Very Inspiring but...
This is a very inspiring book for those who need answers about self discipline, love, faith and spiritual growth. Psychology professors have recommended this book from some time and I understand why. It takes the reader into a deeper look at what love is and the author spends quite some time explaining what it is not. I agree on some of his proposals but the only...
Veröffentlicht am 7. November 1998 von emerastar@aol.com


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8 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Charting a path..., 10. Februar 2006
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Road Less Travelled: A New Psychology of Love, Traditional Values and Spiritual Growth (Taschenbuch)
I first read M. Scott Peck's 'The Road Less Travelled' over 20 years ago, but it is a text to which I return again and again, as Peck's insights and observations remain a constant source of inspiration and guidance in my life. It still finds a ready home in the hands of therapists, counselors, ministers, teachers, career planners, and others as part of their resources, and is not out of place in the home of anyone who cares about the directions of her or his life.
Peck was a clinical psychiatrist - the material for this book came largely from his experiences with clients and others, seeing what worked and what didn't, what was missing and what was mis-understood. Often cases involved psychotherapy (talk therapy), but the processes here are not confined to therapists' offices. The same kinds of problem solving, processing and relationship building that takes place in psychotherapy can be used as life-long tools.
Peck resists labels such as Freudian and Jungian; he doesn't look for, nor does he offer, quick fixes or the psychotherapeutic variety of the get-rich-quick schemes. This book is not a therapy manual, but rather a guide to spiritual growth that incorporates therapeutic and psychological principles. Peck echoes the sentiments of many spiritual directors and leaders through the millennia that spiritual and personal growth are long journeys, not short leaps. It involves dedication and intention, and a willingness to accept risk and change.
Perhaps it is ironic that, given this, the first topic Peck focuses upon is Discipline. However, without discipline, change can go unchecked and uncharted, growth can become problematic, and the human soul becomes susceptible to a host of difficulties. Dedication and application to problem-solving and long-term building (whether it be of retirement funds or of one's own spirit) requires a disciplined approach that recognises that life is difficulty (the first of Buddha's Four Noble Truths, cited by Peck), gratification sometimes needs to be delayed for greater goods, and reality needs to be approached and dealt with responsibly.
Peck calls here for a life to be totally dedicated to the truth. This is hard, because we as human beings are so accustomed to rationalisation and reinterpretation. This kind of dedication also requires a balance in life, and an ability to be flexible as the truths of our lives change - few of us are in possession of timeless and eternal truths governing every aspect of our lives, and often those who feel they are end up disappointed in the end. The continuing creativity of God in our lives requires flexibility, but this is best achieved in a disciplined and balanced context.
Peck then turns to love, a mysterious thing even in the best of times. He identifies some of the myths of `falling in love' and romantic love that our culture through various means idealises, leading to great dissatisfaction when we do not achieve the desired feelings or situations. Peck makes the assertion that love is not really a feeling, but rather an action or activity, that involves a lot of risk-taking (Peck talks about risks of independence, of commitment, of confrontation, and of loss). True love requires discipline and recognition of the needs of the self and others.
The final two sections of the text deal with aspects of religion on the spiritual and psychological development of persons. The first section looks at religion and growth processes. He does a short survey of some attitudes toward religions and denominations, as well as a look at how the modern scientific mindset colours the worldview of modern people, particularly with ideas of verification and skepticism. Some psychologists and theorists have wondered if religion were mass delusions, mass psychosis, or some other kind of sickness. Peck uses interesting extended case studies here to examine the role of various aspects of religion in the developmental lives of several people. Peck asks the question, `Is belief in God a psychopathology?' In some aspects, and for some people, the way they approach and `use' religion, the answer may well be yes. However, Peck also takes the psychotherapeutic community to task for often being too narrow or too dismissive of the value of religious sentiment and institutions in the lives of their charges.
The final section looks at the role of grace in the spiritual growth process. Grace is another mysterious force, like love, that is difficult to pin down and explain. It is also something uncontrollable. Why do some with artistic talent end up being successful and celebrated, and others not? Why do some use their talent, when others don't? In cases of ultimate despair, Peck makes the observation that while it is often clear why some people commit suicide, it is not often clear why others in the same situations don't. Some of this has to do with the unconscious mind that guides us, and some of it has to do with the miracle of serendipity, as Peck describes it.
Peck describes in some detail his concept of what grace is and how it works, in very general terms that relate to no denomination or religion in particular, but has wide applicability. He talks both about resistance to grace and the welcoming of grace. Grace is not easy, and often comes with responsibilities (Bonhoeffer talks about cheap grace; the requirements of grace are noted through scriptures of many religions). Welcoming grace welcomes often more than we bargained for, but also often more than we hoped.
In his afterword, Peck discusses the difficulties of writing in an organised and linear fashion about something so fundamentally disorganised as spiritual growth and therapeutic processes. He also talks about the need for finding competent help when required - ability is not measured by degrees, he states (something true in many professions). This is useful for those seeking a first therapeutic relationship, or needing a change.
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6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Nachdenken lohnt sich, 2. November 2003
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Road Less Travelled: A New Psychology of Love, Traditional Values and Spiritual Growth (Taschenbuch)
Das Buch spricht den intelligenten Leser an, der bereit ist zu reflektieren über sich selbst und unsere Welt heute. Peck bringt sehr originelle und gleichzeitig klassische Ideen zu den Themen Selbstbeherrschung, Liebe und Gnade.Er zeigt, daß Leben sich lohnt.Es ist ein großes Abenteuer, für jeden einmalig. The Road .. ist ein Buch, das man wiederholt zur Hand nimmt, um die Landkarte seines Lebens zu überprüfen und zu revidieren. Es ist kein esoterisches, sondern im Sinn von Platon und Aristoteles philosophisches Buch.
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Two roads diverged in a wood..., 15. Dezember 2003
Von 
...And I took the one less traveled by...
The essence of this book is summed up in the first three words. Life is difficult. Peck shows us that our avoidance of problems and their accompanying suffering are the root of mental illness. Difficulties are a fact of life, and they never go away. By refusing to acknowledge and overcome them, we create a barrier to our spiritual growth.
When I first read this book several years ago, I was not ready to hear its message. I had created my own reality, believing that I was working at my full capacity and was on the road to achieving my full potential.
While this book was not the source of revelation, it has been a catalyst to help me realize the self-deception that kept me from being a truly loving person. There is a long road ahead, but I am now on the path of lifelong learning and growth. The Road Less Traveled has helped me identify and remove many of the barriers that up until now had held me back from being the person God created me to be.
...And that has made all the difference.
Larry Hehn, author of Get the Prize: Nine Keys for a Life of Victory
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Very Inspiring but..., 7. November 1998
This is a very inspiring book for those who need answers about self discipline, love, faith and spiritual growth. Psychology professors have recommended this book from some time and I understand why. It takes the reader into a deeper look at what love is and the author spends quite some time explaining what it is not. I agree on some of his proposals but the only problem I find with his insights is that they are too simplistic. His definition of love is way to general and although he painstakingly emphasized that, all and all, love is the basic act of a couple's boundaries collapsing, I still feel that this does not apply in all situations. And I really didn't agree with his idea that falling in love is as a "trap" into marriage. Again too simplistic and not to mention cynical and sarcastic. There are a lot of things that disturb me about this book. I feel the author is a little rough on the parents and should read Louise L Hayes books and give parents some credit. No one is perfect!! Remember: one should understand how parents work with their children. They are doing the best they can from what they have learned themselves from their own parents. This is how they've been conditioned. Come on..I know there are some really BAD parents out there. But for those who do not live up to their child's EVERY need, one can not equate that with evil (yes, he equates laziness with evil.. again too simplistic and false, but that's another book). Toward the end of the book... Peck practically gives us his testimony.. It was very inspirational for those seeking to reach their higher self.. but if you are not a Christian you will feel left out i would have given this book fewer stars but there ARE a look of good insights in this books.. especially the chapters on self-discipline.. can't blame the world for your troubles.. you got to get up and work to achieve you main goals in life... eventually into spiritual growth. I also agreed with his view on changing and how he equated it with maturity. Peck's a very stern, no-nonsense speaker and a good thinker. I would recommend this book for those looking for answers to why their life is going no where, but at the same time I would recommend they disregard some of his theories to achieve the maximum effect of this book (and also prevent them from getting upset and throwing the book). Remember it's ok to disagree with what you read in this book. Peck has a way of making things seem so definite and written in stone just because he says so. I've read plenty of his books so I know!
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen THE BOOK THAT SPIT THE STRAIGHT RAW TRUTH OF LIFE, 9. Dezember 1999
I've read a lot of books about life and stages of life that people claimed were awesome and were must read books. The books were all right but never really told the truth about life. Such as life is hard and during life we face challenge in each stage of our lives and once you get pass that life is easier and more understandable. Peck is the only author that tells the truth about life. A lot the problem that he faced and talked about I could relate to and if I couldn't I new some one who faced them problems. From reading this book it show me that I'm not the only one who faces problems in life. It's easier for a person to talk about situations they didn't encounter, but from what a friend may have told them. That is probable the reason why I can't relate to the authors. But with Scott Peck, I see that he has faced the same problems that everyday people faced and if he hasn't his patient have faced these problems. There was one section in this book that really influenced me. The section on Discipline this section dealt with Problems and managing time. I recommend this book to all people who are experience any problems in life this book is guaranteed to help you in any stage of your life that is experiences difficult situations.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Leicht zu lesen, aber anspruchsvoll., 7. September 2009
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
"Life is difficult". So fängt dieses Buch an - ein gut gewählter Anfang, denn um diese Aussage dreht sich eigentlich das ganze Buch. "Life is difficult". Diese Wahrheit soll man akzeptieren, und die Verantwortung für sein Leben auf sich nehmen.

Ich hatte es mir gekauft, weil ich einen kleinen Vortrag darüber gehört hatte, der mich sehr neugierig gemacht hatte. Es hat meine Erwartungen nicht enttäuscht.

Das Buch ist alles andere als oberflächlich und auch nicht so schnell verdaut und zur Seite gelegt. Zwar ist es gut leserlich geschrieben, aber doch anspruchsvoll. Warum? Weil der Autor sehr hohe Ansprüche an den Leser hat (so empfinde ich es zumindest.) Nicht an den Leser als Literaten, sondern an den Leser als Menschen.

Wenn ich aus dem Buch aufgetaucht bin, dachte ich manchmal: So tiefgründig kommt mir das Leben gar nicht immer vor, und zwar manchmal schwer, aber auch nicht immer schwer. Schwer im Vergleich zu was überhaupt?

"The Road Less Traveled" ist ein wunderschönes und ehrlich geschriebenes Buch, man sollte es jedoch kritisch betrachten, und wenn man ohnehin schon ein gewissenhafter Mensch ist, muss man sich nicht davon verrückt machen lassen.
Der Haken am Buch ist nämlich, dass es den Leser abstrakt kritisiert und "weiß", was der Leser falsch macht, ohne ihn zu kennen - das macht nervös - aber allzu präzise wird das Buch nicht. Es werden nur einzelne Beispiele genannt, in denen sich nicht jeder wiederfinden muss, und die "Lektionen" des Buches lassen Spielraum für Interpretation.
Da ziehe ich persönlich doch vor, mich von Mitmenschen konkret kritisieren zu lassen. Es ärgert mich zwar genauso, aber immerhin weiß ich dann (hoffentlich) auch genauer, was ich anders machen kann.

"The Road Less Traveled" regt einen gewissermaßen dazu an, nach den moralischen Sternen zu greifen. Manchmal ist das genau das Richtige, doch manchmal muss man einfach nur ein gewöhnlicher Mensch sein dürfen und sein Butterbrot essen können.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Charting a path..., 21. März 2006
I first read M. Scott Peck's `The Road Less Travelled' over 20 years ago, but it is a text to which I return again and again, as Peck's insights and observations remain a constant source of inspiration and guidance in my life. It still finds a ready home in the hands of therapists, counselors, ministers, teachers, career planners, and others as part of their resources, and is not out of place in the home of anyone who cares about the directions of her or his life.
Peck is a clinical psychiatrist - the material for this book came largely from his experiences with clients and others, seeing what worked and what didn't, what was missing and what was mis-understood. Often cases involved psychotherapy (talk therapy), but the processes here are not confined to therapists' offices. The same kinds of problem solving, processing and relationship building that takes place in psychotherapy can be used as life-long tools.
Peck resists labels such as Freudian and Jungian; he doesn't look for, nor does he offer, quick fixes or the psychotherapeutic variety of the get-rich-quick schemes. This book is not a therapy manual, but rather a guide to spiritual growth that incorporates therapeutic and psychological principles. Peck echoes the sentiments of many spiritual directors and leaders through the millennia that spiritual and personal growth are long journeys, not short leaps. It involves dedication and intention, and a willingness to accept risk and change.
Perhaps it is ironic that, given this, the first topic Peck focuses upon is Discipline. However, without discipline, change can go unchecked and uncharted, growth can become problematic, and the human soul becomes susceptible to a host of difficulties. Dedication and application to problem-solving and long-term building (whether it be of retirement funds or of one's own spirit) requires a disciplined approach that recognises that life is difficulty (the first of Buddha's Four Noble Truths, cited by Peck), gratification sometimes needs to be delayed for greater goods, and reality needs to be approached and dealt with responsibly.
Peck calls here for a life to be totally dedicated to the truth. This is hard, because we as human beings are so accustomed to rationalisation and reinterpretation. This kind of dedication also requires a balance in life, and an ability to be flexible as the truths of our lives change - few of us are in possession of timeless and eternal truths governing every aspect of our lives, and often those who feel they are end up disappointed in the end. The continuing creativity of God in our lives requires flexibility, but this is best achieved in a disciplined and balanced context.
Peck then turns to love, a mysterious thing even in the best of times. He identifies some of the myths of `falling in love' and romantic love that our culture through various means idealises, leading to great dissatisfaction when we do not achieve the desired feelings or situations. Peck makes the assertion that love is not really a feeling, but rather an action or activity, that involves a lot of risk-taking (Peck talks about risks of independence, of commitment, of confrontation, and of loss). True love requires discipline and recognition of the needs of the self and others.
The final two sections of the text deal with aspects of religion on the spiritual and psychological development of persons. The first section looks at religion and growth processes. He does a short survey of some attitudes toward religions and denominations, as well as a look at how the modern scientific mindset colours the worldview of modern people, particularly with ideas of verification and skepticism. Some psychologists and theorists have wondered if religion were mass delusions, mass psychosis, or some other kind of sickness. Peck uses interesting extended case studies here to examine the role of various aspects of religion in the developmental lives of several people. Peck asks the question, `Is belief in God a psychopathology?' In some aspects, and for some people, the way they approach and `use' religion, the answer may well be yes. However, Peck also takes the psychotherapeutic community to task for often being too narrow or too dismissive of the value of religious sentiment and institutions in the lives of their charges.
The final section looks at the role of grace in the spiritual growth process. Grace is another mysterious force, like love, that is difficult to pin down and explain. It is also something uncontrollable. Why do some with artistic talent end up being successful and celebrated, and others not? Why do some use their talent, when others don't? In cases of ultimate despair, Peck makes the observation that while it is often clear why some people commit suicide, it is not often clear why others in the same situations don't. Some of this has to do with the unconscious mind that guides us, and some of it has to do with the miracle of serendipity, as Peck describes it.
Peck describes in some detail his concept of what grace is and how it works, in very general terms that relate to no denomination or religion in particular, but has wide applicability. He talks both about resistance to grace and the welcoming of grace. Grace is not easy, and often comes with responsibilities (Bonhoeffer talks about cheap grace; the requirements of grace are noted through scriptures of many religions). Welcoming grace welcomes often more than we bargained for, but also often more than we hoped.
In his afterword, Peck discusses the difficulties of writing in an organised and linear fashion about something so fundamentally disorganised as spiritual growth and therapeutic processes. He also talks about the need for finding competent help when required - ability is not measured by degrees, he states (something true in many professions). This is useful for those seeking a first therapeutic relationship, or needing a change.
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2.0 von 5 Sternen Starts with a bang, ends making a mockery of psychiatry, 21. Juli 1999
Von Ein Kunde
It's as if this book were written by two people. One person direct, pulling no punches about how to live a fulfilling life, and the other a narrow person trying to promote his chosen profession over all others.
I started reading the book and was fixated. Life is difficult, and If you want to live, then quit whining. You get a world view in life, and you get stuck there maybe for your entire life, never changing or growing. You have to accept death in order to live. The man writing the book had reached through it, grabbed me by the collar and forced me to open my eyes and see. Truthfully, I came to a point when I put the book down for a day, to scared to read on. But I did, and I was disappointed.
I expected deep analysis on all of the things we as people must come to grips with, giving up youth, accepting death and infirmity. Instead, I read a tortuous justification of why it's an honorable occupation to be a psychiatrist. Because they help people (this is what the whole love thing is about: it could just as well have been why loving God is important, why (socialism/communism) is the ultimate good, or why a loving family is good).
The remaining chapters sum up why psychiatrists are better than scientists. Apparently, scientists are rather limited in scope, only believing in reproducible things and measured things. This as opposed to those things that can't be measured or reproduced (or understood), like E.S.P., or why people just don't die instantly. Because he doesn't understand something, it must be some form of magic.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The "bible" of life- more than that, a book to live by., 20. März 1999
Von Ein Kunde
I have read many books in my lifetime but none has had such an impact as this one. This is easily, hands-down the best book of its kind. I have read Further Along the Road... by Peck and while it had useful information, it was not as informative and enjoyable as this book. ( I would also highly recommend "People of the Lie") I enjoyed the stories of his personal life as well as the patients he helped (and that had helped him) along the way. This is a serious book that still made me laugh & cry sometimes. It touches on so many issues of responsibility and discipline that no review I could write could possibly do it justice. Despite a previous reviewer's comments that this book is inaccessable- it is not! Very easy to read & not too technical. This is a book that anyone who is willing to open themselves to the pain of change & challange, will forever be changed & enriched. And the author himself admitted that any definition of Love would be subject to criticism from others- but dealing with something as nebulous and intangible, I think Mr. Peck does a terrific job. Especially when he notes what love is NOT. It has helped me to identify when someone's motives are not out of love- which seeks to help the person it touches. I really cannot think of another book that is as important as this one. Give it to a loved one as a gift--a gift they will never forget and hopefully- if they aren't "character disordered" they will see that this book can help them perhaps more than any other.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen ein buch das mein leben verändert hat, 12. Januar 2003
Von Ein Kunde
ein buch, das extrem mut macht, eine anleitung zum glücklich sein- wie so viele, aber da es auf nachhaltigkeit abzielt nicht so einfach zu befolgen. wer aber bereit ist, sich damit auseinander zu setzen und an sich zu arbeiten, wird reichlich belohnt. ersetzt schon fast eine therapie. einfach geschrieben, manchmal nervt die amerikanisch belehrende art ein wenig- einfach darüber hinweg sehen und sich auf die grundaussagen konzentrieren. oft nichts wirklich neues, aber es tut gut, sich in seinen ansichten bestätigt zu wissen- manchmal ist es auch sehr hilfreich, seine vagen gefühle ausformuliert vorgelegt zu bekommen.
unbedingt empfehlenswert!!
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