Kundenrezensionen


16 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (12)
4 Sterne:
 (1)
3 Sterne:
 (1)
2 Sterne:
 (2)
1 Sterne:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


9 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Flaubert's Parrot - ein ungewöhnlicher, witziger Roman
Flaubert's Parrot ist einer der bekanntesten Romane von Julian Barnes, wie so oft ein total witziger, ironischer Text.
Im Mittelpunkt steht der britische Arzt Geoffrey Braithwaite, der, da er unfähig ist, sich mit seiner eigenen Vergangenheit und dem Tod seiner Ehefrau auseinenderzusetzen, statt dessen ausführlich das Leben des französischen...
Veröffentlicht am 11. November 2003 von tele-sonntag

versus
2 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen This bok is very hard to read and enjoy.
I don't see why this book gets high marks. To me it is inconsequential, un-entertaining, confusing... It's like throwing a ball in the air and waiting for it to drop back. And waiting... And waiting... I can heartily recommend other works by Barnes. But not this one. Read Flaubert instead.
Am 6. Oktober 1999 veröffentlicht


‹ Zurück | 1 2 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

9 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Flaubert's Parrot - ein ungewöhnlicher, witziger Roman, 11. November 2003
Flaubert's Parrot ist einer der bekanntesten Romane von Julian Barnes, wie so oft ein total witziger, ironischer Text.
Im Mittelpunkt steht der britische Arzt Geoffrey Braithwaite, der, da er unfähig ist, sich mit seiner eigenen Vergangenheit und dem Tod seiner Ehefrau auseinenderzusetzen, statt dessen ausführlich das Leben des französischen Schriftstellers Gustave Flaubert erforscht. Der Titel kommt zustande, da der Arzt versucht das Rätsel zu lösen, welcher der beiden Papageien auf die er bei der Suche stösst, der authentische ist, der auf Flaubert's Schreibtisch stand. Überhaupt ist das Thema Authentizität ein sehr zentrales Thema, was äußerst witzig und komplex verarbeitet wird. Der Roman ist besonders ungewöhnlich was die Form angeht, mittendrin findet man ein kleines Lexikon, eine Klassenarbeit und Passagen über Literaturkritik, was sehr abwechslungsreich und auflockernd wirkt.
Insgesamt ein immens spannendes und bissiges Buch, was mit Konventionen bricht, zum Nachdenken anregt, einen aber auch sehr oft zum Schmunzeln bringt!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen An unexpected little masterpiece, 21. Mai 1999
I don't want to say a great deal about this book except that it is marvelous. In one way it reminds me very much of another recent masterpiece, D. M. Thomas's WHITE HOTEL, in that you don't really know what it is about until you have read most of it. When you realize what the true subject of the book is, the effect is jarring. Beautiful. And you learn a lot about Flaubert as well!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Flauberts Zeit "revisited", 3. April 2012
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Flaubert's Parrot (Taschenbuch)
"Flauberts Parrot" von Julian Barnes ist eines der geistreichsten und intelligentesten Bücher, die ich jemals gelesen habe. Barnes schafft es, den Leser mit Hypothesen, Spekulationen und Mutmaßungen, aber auch mit gut recherchierten Fakten in die Welt Flauberts und seiner Zeit zu versetzen. Ein intellektuelles, aber kein trockenes Lesevergnügen!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Highbrow Fun, 7. Oktober 1998
Von Ein Kunde
I use this in an AP course I teach, and the kids love it. We read Madame Bovary, "A Simple Heart," and then the Barnes. And this is how I recommend you read it too. (Knowing Sentimental Education probably helps too.) Barnes is right to choose Flaubert as his protagonist's obsession; other choices he (and Braithwaite) make are also felicitous. Best of all, when all the virtuoso pyrotechnics are finished, what remains is a profoundly moving human story. In many ways, this novel redeems so many of the empty puzzles passing themselves off as postmodern fiction these days. For me, Barnes belongs in the company of Pynchon and Gass.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen a paradigm for a postmodern novel which is fun to read, 26. Februar 1999
Von Ein Kunde
flauberts parrot is a paradigm for a poststructuralist novel. well, actually you can't really call it a novel ... the way barnes deals with history and past is typical for a postmodern treatment of the past. nothing is certain, nothing is real. but barnes goes even one step further: he does not end up denying everything but he accepts that something like a past does exist. but also on the level of histoire the novel is fun to read. barnes is one of the most stylish writers of our times and displays a vast knowledge about the subject (Flaubert). not easy to understand but easy to enjoy.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen a sublime quirky book, 27. August 1998
It's interesting there've been only 3 reviews on this book. Does this mean people aren't reading the book? And what about the three reviews...they're all glowing. What does this mean? I don't think I would have liked it were I a woman. Not that the book's at all misogynist. Rather, its sensibilities are male, so perhaps the book appeals to men. In all, the book is a masterpiece of thought and expression, heavy with ideas and twists of mind genially served up. It's moved me to order a Flaubert novel and now I'll do a little sleuthing of my own!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen If you like anything, read this book, 21. Mai 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Read this book. Read this book. Read this book. But first, read Pale Fire, by Vladimir Nabokov. That done, read this book.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Julian Barnes on How Flaubert Can or Can't Change Your Life, 12. August 1997
Von Ein Kunde
"Flaubert's Parrot, c'est moi." (Fran Lebowitz)

When someone mentions Flaubert in conversation, the first thing that usually pops into one's head is - almost inevitably - "Madame Bovary". The first thing I think of though is "Flaubert's Parrot" by Julian Barnes.
It has become not uncommon for the Brits to write perceptive analysis of French authors - Alain de Botton's "How Prouste Can Change Your Life" is only a recent example. It's probably the very nature of a complicated relationship between the two countries, their often emphasized difference that bears fruit like Barnes' masterpiece: profound knowledge of the close neighbor, on one hand, and on the other, an ability to keep one's distance and stay aloof, for the purposes of estranged observation. Barnes employs both. As a result, we have a work of art that is neither English nor French, but both, in which English irony and self-scrutiy mingle with French grace and wit in a most successful combination.
"Flaubert's Parrot" is also a mixture of styles, both fiction and literary criticism, diary and biography. We get to view Flaubert's life though the eyes of one Doctor Geoffrey Braithwaite who sets off to reconstruct the writer's life in order to - probably - better understand the human nature and thus to - possibly - comprehend a mystery of his own wife's suicide.
In Flaubert's melancholy the protagonist finds - perhaps an illusionary - comfort, almost a feeling of shared sadness which he might fail to encounter among his contemporary friends, in case he has any. It actually seems that Gustave, as Braithwaite takes to calling the writer, is his only friend. There is an "advantage of making friends with those already dead." Both are lonely, prone to self-analysis and are mourning a loss: Flaubert, of his mother; the doctor, of his wife.
A curious "animal-theory" introduced by Barnes could have become the ground for a Ph.D. study by one of those contemporary scholars who often turn to obscure topics having run out of traditional ones. Throughout his notes Flaubert compares himself to a number of animals, but "secretly, essentially, he is a Bear." It truly tells us more about his character than it might seem. We tend to see ourselves through others. Every one of us has a fluffy, flying or even creepy counterpart in the animal kingdom. Horoscopes tell us we are "aries", "pisces", "leos", "scorpios", "capricorns". Barnes plays with linguistic variations of the French word "ours" (a rough fellow, a police cell) and it's literary allusions (La Fontaine's fable). Now we have yet another image of the writer: Flaubear.
But then why is the book called Flaubert's Parrot?
We are to participate in yet another quest that Doctor Braithwaite undertakes: there exists a stuffed parrot which supposedly inspired Flaubert to write "Un Coer Simple", a story about a poor lonely woman and her bird.Which is also a symbol of the writer's grotesque and his other animal counterpart, according to Braithwaite.
Braithwaite's notes about France where he travels in "a packed cross-Channel ferry,..a modern ship of fools" are alternated with Flaubert's about England - another hint to the "mixed background" of the book. The same with the past and present: they intervene, implicate and compliment each other, cancel and suggest each other's truths. The protagonist tries to reconstruct the past through memoirs, literature, Things which feed his imagination. Braithwaite does not find the past romantic, or better, or particularly interesting - it is merely a framework of Flaubert's creativity, an ambiance of his exitence. It simply is. Flaubert's view of his time was not much brighter than Braithwaite's of today's world. After all, OUR past was only HIS everyday present.
The most fascinating and subtle interplay of the two lives is to be found in the last chapters, in which Braithwaite tells a story of his marriage and of his wife's death. The dead writer comments on it, from the past. The story is intermingled with the episodes of Flaubert's life that have to do with grief.
Braithwaite's wife was unfaithful ("Madame Bovary, c'est moi"?). Through Flaubert's writing he seeks to understand the nature of her adultery. Was it simply, as Nabokov put it, "a most conventional way to rise above the conventional"? or was she merely unhappy? It strikes us that Braithwaite is a doctor, just like Charles Bovary. It does not surprise us that he does not find any solutions in the book:"Books say: she did this because. Life says: she did this..." Books and dissertations might explain why Emma commited adultery and died. Nothing will explain why Ellen did. Braithwaite is left tete-a-tete with himself, like Gustave after his beloved mother's death.
Braithwaite is alone, at the end of his parrot-quest, facing three identical parrots at the provincial French museum of Natural History. "Perhaps...we should prefer the consolation of non-fulfillment."
Well, perhaps.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen excellent, 30. August 1999
Von Ein Kunde
This is one of the best books I¡ve ever read. I could hardly put it down. I thought the beginning especially had the hallmarks of genius. I look forward to reading the author¡s other works. I have no regrets about giving this 5 stars.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Unusually memorable and among my top 10 favorites, 16. August 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Although I read this book years ago, it still comes to mind when I am asked about the best books I have read. It is especially interesting and touching. Best read while in Paris.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 2 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

Flaubert's Parrot
Flaubert's Parrot von Julian Barnes (Taschenbuch - 2. Juli 2009)
Gebraucht & neu ab: EUR 6,15
Auf meinen Wunschzettel Zahlungsmöglichkeiten ansehen
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen