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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen An excellent start
Possibly one of the greatest things to come from reading any book, is that your entire perception of something, a paradigm you may have, is completely and entirely set on end. Unfortunately, even for the most avid of readers, this is a very rare, however the day I completed Morris' unprecedented work I never viewed my world in the same way again. This is by no means an...
Veröffentlicht am 2. Mai 2000 von David K. Goldstein

versus
3.0 von 5 Sternen A must read if you ever wonder WHY people do what they do.
Desmond Morris does what he does best, in plain english he
writes about the human animal when in large groups - the
evolution of society, the wonders and the flaws. As usual,
some of his ideas make the skin crawl but it makes you think
about why you do what you do. The section on the ten command
-ments of dominance was an eye open when compared...
Am 11. Februar 1997 veröffentlicht


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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen An excellent start, 2. Mai 2000
Von 
David K. Goldstein (NY, NY USA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Possibly one of the greatest things to come from reading any book, is that your entire perception of something, a paradigm you may have, is completely and entirely set on end. Unfortunately, even for the most avid of readers, this is a very rare, however the day I completed Morris' unprecedented work I never viewed my world in the same way again. This is by no means an exaggeration. Morris breaks human beings down so effectively, so methodically that it is nearly impossible not to agree with him that indeed, stripped of our veneer of civilization, the inner workings of a naked ape are all one is left with. Not to say Morris doesn't get a few things wrong along the way. I am in full accord with modern day evolutionary psychologists (or sociobiologists, or whatever the hell they decide to call themselves) who fault Morris for his pair bond theory, amongst other things, which indeed does stand on very weak ground. I can't see how one gender would ever develop a trait that in the end would only be beneficial to the other gender, as would have had to have happen for this theory to work. Fortunately, though, I tend to see this as a mere chink in the elaborate chains of thought Morris constructs, unlike his detractors who claim it undermines his entire book. This is stupid. Morris was writing back in time when evolutionary psychology was in the zygote stage, completely unknown to anyone beside a handful of scientists. Morris sets forth in his book powerful and logical evidence and explanations that support the clearest model out there with which to view our species. His critics point out that his book failed to create a renaissance in academia, but so what? When has the academic world ever been quick to change its precious models, especially ones that focus on ourselves? Even today, years after not only Morris, but the even more persuasive work of Trivers, Williams, Wilson, Symons et al has been given, academia still has yet to truly embrace the sociobiology paradigm, despite the mountain of evidence and obvious intelligence of the theory. This is indeed a true sin, because it is a beautiful theory, one that not only helps us truly understand ourselves and our relations to each other, but to the world around us, placing us firmly within the grip of Nature, yet able to take our own course just the same.
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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Excellent study companion to Naked Ape, 19. Oktober 1999
After reading The Naked Ape, I was driven to read this next installment of the "human trilogy" by D.M. I found that it delved even further into the methods to our "civilized madness." Morris brings to light the true effect of civilization on our species. This book effectively explains the stresses and effects that our cities have placed upon our animal nature. I recommend this book to any person who is interested in human behavior. I believe it takes the eye of an ethologist to separate bias from interpretation. Morris accomplishes this swimmingly as he attaches biological meaning to even our most spiritual behaviors.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen The naked man, 18. März 2000
Von 
Fabrice P. Laussy (Southampton (UK)) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
This book sure provides the reader with an appealing, refreshingly bright view of the human species, without fear to face man as an intelligent animal, yet still an animal. It is utmost logical, everything stems from always astute arguments or analogies which make the exposition a charming and clever view of humankind's evolution, but this is also and partly for this reason the perfect illustration of the non-scientific, somewhat dangerous book, especially for those readers who wouldn't appreciate the difference between acknowledged facts reported in the book and speculations asserted by the author.
Ascertained facts are narrated in a most fascinating and enthralling speech. For instance, the physical and emotional changes accompanying the act of making love or getting ready for fight are terrific descriptions. Most insights, with more or less experimental evidence to support them, are amazing and will really make you love the book, for their convincing and sounding universal explanations of fundamentals wonders. One will find for instance possible reasons for why our females have orgasms--something quite unique to our species--why do we need love, what are the motivations for jealousy, friendship, courtship, mating in humankind, etc. But too often does Morris attempt to conceal his scientifically-free allegations along with accepted ones. Then come the clearly out-of-topic extrapolations, like how human beings will have to evolve in order to avoid war extermination (said to be more than liable). His description of him faking a dominated ape to avoid paying a speed-excess fine gives the book a taste of tricks cookbook to fool others, when we like to see it as a popularization essay of ethnology with extras.
Thus, no question whether you should read or not this book, read it! But please be sure not to fall in the trap of blindly eating all is said, because that seems to explain (at most, that could perfectly explain, but that isn't the way science goes). Morris did such a good job of mixing science and speculation that non-specialists, me first, won't make the difference easily. Most important is to enjoy the book, and avoid fanatic response afterthat (doing the ape as Morris to take advantage upon other people seeming the more likely stupid reaction). Don't let this change your life.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A Classic, 30. Dezember 1999
Desmond Morris wrote "The Naked Ape" in the late 1960's, and it is a classic which established the field of evolutionary anthropology. His ideas were revolutionary at the time, and he clearly says so. If there is a fault in the book, it is that he covers too much ground too quickly. I think his purpose at the time, however, was simply to condition the reader to thinking of people as an animal that has been subject to the forces of biological evolution on the Savannah for 98 percent of our evolution. Our species only formed farming communities 10,000 years ago.
Much of Morris's conjecture has been turned into solid research in more recent years. For example, studies have found that males are sexually attracted to females having a waist/hips ratio of 0.7. This is universal among contemporary societies including primitive societies. When shown diagrams of women having different waist/hips ratios, male members of the primitive societies chose the 0.7 ratio and specifically indicated child bearing ability being linked to it. Females universally are attracted to males having a waist/hip ratio of 0.85.
The argument between nurturing versus evolution is likely to continue. This book started the argument. It is certainly a serious argument. Some readers may prefer not to think as humans as being animals. Some readers, particulary those interested in newer cultural trends such as feminism, may find certain of Morris's arguments objectionable. The material is oriented towards understanding how biological evolution of Homo Sapiens has affected their social behavior. It is not directly related to how to get along with your lover or spouse. However, the book was as thought provoking today as when it was written. It is an excellent introduction to the field of evolutionary anthropology.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Excellent, 29. Mai 1999
Von Ein Kunde
You may not agree everything the author said, but definetely this book will make you think. (I assume the previous reader's review mistakenly rated this book as one star but actually should be five?)
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A must read for any homo sapien, 14. Oktober 1999
Desmond Morris explains what we have been taught to deny ourselves for centuries, that we are merely homo sapien sapiens. He does not deny that we have evolved beyond all our counterparts here on the earth; however he does reinforce that we are now more than products of the earth. We have become products not only of our biology, but also of our growing self awareness. I tend to think that Morris is stating that we are cognitively denying our roots simply because we cannot succumb to them. Our own arrogance is separating us from that which we are, leading to our betrayal of our humanness. Desmond Morris seems to understand that we must know where we are coming from in order to understand where we are going. Without this understanding we may be headed for eventual disaster.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Something for everyone, 27. Juni 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Naked Ape (Taschenbuch)
There isn't much more to say other than this is an amazing book, but I'll try. It includes comparisons of human and non-human animals in the realms of sex, child-rearing, fighting, hunting, and day-to-day living. Not one of the 250 or so pages was uninteresting. It's a very quick read and you'll find yourself reading it again and again. This book is a must for any biology major or anyone interesting in learning about our origins. I would definitely suggest checking it out.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen A must read if you ever wonder WHY people do what they do., 11. Februar 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Desmond Morris does what he does best, in plain english he
writes about the human animal when in large groups - the
evolution of society, the wonders and the flaws. As usual,
some of his ideas make the skin crawl but it makes you think
about why you do what you do. The section on the ten command
-ments of dominance was an eye open when compared to the recent presidential elections. And of course, there's a
chapter on sex for those obsessed. ;)
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Plant this seed, sprout your own.M.F.00, 21. Februar 2000
Dr. Morris has undoubtedly tasted the savorous fruits of truth. In despite of common cultures pliable "billboard society" rational, Desmond Morris has an enlightening vision of who "we" are. Wild by nature we are, however tamed we may appear. It is our redundant disipline which quarantines us from our true nature. "Our own arrogance is seperating us from that which we are, leading to our betrayal of our humaness."
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6 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen I beg all of you to question 'Naked Ape' inside and out, 11. Oktober 1999
Von Ein Kunde
If you missed it the first time: I beg all of you to question 'Naked Ape' inside and out. Specifically you who assumed right off the bat that his theory of the evolution of female topography makes sense. Morris hardly bothers to look at human evolution without slanting it toward the preferences of modern culture. As one example: he immediately assumes since that because men of 20nth century western society prefer curvaceous women, men of all societies share in their preference. NOT the case! Not only do women in isolated hunter-gatherer societies not emulate the aesthetic standards of modern western males, but the men of those primitive societies don't even care for hemisperical breasts or curvy figures. Secondly Morris obviously loves his vision of man as the hunter and stops at nothing to revolve all of anthropology around it. What that leaves us with is a whole lotta speculation stemming from a LARGELY unproven theory of human evolution as I must remind anybody before they pick this book up.
It seems Morris doesn't question the Savannah Theory as much as he should. He outlines the social structure of baboons and compares it to that of humans. Doesn't he find it odd that he makes human hierarchies sound more similar to baboons than that of our closer chimpanzee kin? He explains that as both baboons and humans moved out onto savannah territory, they restructured society in such a way to keep it glued together out in the perilous open. Doesn't he find it odd that other species who evolve in savannah land don't follow these same trends.
Thirdly, according to 'Naked Ape' men evolved to hunt, women evolved because men hunted. (But women never seemed to influence the evolution of men) He describes woman's evolutionary role as something of a pampered cavebunny who survived only by pleasing men sexually. The carefully veiled sexism doesn't bother me nearly as much as how far-fetched some of these ideas were. I hope anybody who has read this book or will read this book will keep in mind that some of this material can be outdated and one-sided.
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