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6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Literary Masterpiece
A rather simple plot of a southern family that has lost status is turned into a commentary on human nature and the individual both as part of society as well as an antagonist. I cannot pinpoint the one aspect of The Sound and the Fury that made it my favorite book. Human flaws and virtues are realistically depicted making the characters interesting and easy to relate...
Veröffentlicht am 24. Juni 2000 von Ana

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3.0 von 5 Sternen Nice, sad, tragic.
Whether The Sound and the Fury is worthy of being accepted as one of the 20th century's greatest, I'm not sure. At times it was great, at times it was woeful, at times it was downright tedious. Much effort, I'm sure, was given in writing this novel (though by the first part it may not seem so), but it isn't the best book to hit the stores since the Bible.
The...
Veröffentlicht am 23. März 2000 von Dr. Big Balls


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6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Literary Masterpiece, 24. Juni 2000
A rather simple plot of a southern family that has lost status is turned into a commentary on human nature and the individual both as part of society as well as an antagonist. I cannot pinpoint the one aspect of The Sound and the Fury that made it my favorite book. Human flaws and virtues are realistically depicted making the characters interesting and easy to relate to. Rather than glorifying unusual occurrences, everyday events are presented with their deserved importance. The diction, which at more than one occasion is difficult to follow, ranges from simple to in occasions beautifully poetic.
The first section is told from the point of view of a 33-year-old mentally handicapped man. This character used only description of sensory perception as a tool of understanding. And it is often described as a "man-child", a 3-year old brain in a 33 year old body .
The second section is written from the point of view of a brilliant 18-year-old college student named Quentin Compson. He loses himself in elaborate prose and imaginary conversations; his main concerns are those he cannot control: the passage of time, the changing and growing up of those around him and a contradictory society. Quentin holds on to his idealistic views but soon loses all hope as he replays in his mind his father's cynical arguments and faces a society where he feels he is misunderstood.
The third section is told from the point of view of Jason, the eldest brother. He's most likely regarded as an "unlovable character" characterized by his pessimism and cynicism. He is very practical, greedy and selfish. However, the reader cannot but feel pity for this man. While he's brother was sent to Harvard, he was made to stay in his hometown and become a simple businessman. Jason is also terribly unhappy. Unlike Quentin, this unhappiness is not due to existential causes, but plane prejudice and lack of financial prosperity.
The last section differs from the first three. Rather than being in "stream-of-consciousness" form, it's point of view is omniscient. The section is named after the woman-servant named Dilsey. Unlike Quentin who feared the passage of time and Benjy who was stuck in the past, Dilsey adjusts to time and accommodates her life according to the passage of time.
I have been most impacted by books whose characters are not stereotyped or idealized, but contain human virtues as well as flaws. After finishing each section of The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner, I felt sorrow in abandoning the minds characters I had grown to care for, or grown to dislike.
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12 von 13 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Meisterwerk aus dem Süden der USA, 17. April 2002
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Sound And The Fury (Vintage Classics) (Taschenbuch)
William Faulkner hat mit diesem vielstimmigen Roman etwas ganz Eigenes geschaffen und neue Maßstäbe gesetzt. Zwischen Vergessen und Erinnern leben seine Gestalten in ihrer eigenen Wirklichkeit. Faulkner erschafft diese Welt, ohne zu werten. Im Niedergang der Familie Compson, um den es vordergründig geht, bewahren die handelnden Personen ihre Eigenständigkeit. Sie scheinen in einer archaischen Zeit zu leben, nicht nur der "Idiot der Familie", Benjy, durch dessen Augen wir in die Geschichte eingeführt werden. Ein sprachlich und inhaltlich genialer Wurf, in dem die ersten und die letzten Dinge ineinander übergehen. Das Buch gehört zu den wichtigsten Büchern des 20. Jahrhunderts.
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A difficult but rewarding read., 3. Juli 2000
This was the first Faulkner novle I read. The first time I read it, I wanted to chuck the book through my bedroom window. But after taking my time, reading about Faulkner, and mapping out the Benjy section with the help of Cliff's Notes, I began to enjoy this book very much. It's basically centered around one event: the daughter's lost of her virginity and the subsequent effects on her family afterwards. The book is broken into four section, each named after one of her three brothers (Benjy, Quentin, and Jason) and the family housekeeper (Disley). Each narrator gives their views of the situation, (Disley's section is narrated by Faulkner himself.)Each chapter is written in quite a different style; the most difficult, most would agree, being the first chapter, the Benjy section. Benjy is mentally retarded and has no sense of time; he works purely on physical sensation. The timeframe during his narrative is all over the place. To clear things up, Cliff's Notes map out most of the time changes in his section. (No one but Faulkner himself knows all of them, and he's dead.) Once you come to know where the scene changes, the story starts to unfold. The second section, Quentin's, is written in stream-of-consciousness. Quentin's section is written with sohpisticated vocabulary and sentence structure because he is a student at Harvard. Jason's section is probably the quickest read; he's incredibly ignorant and cruel. The Disley section is probably the most satisfying overall, but each section needs the help of the others to reach the story's full effect. This is well worth the read if you have the time.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen If I like this book, anyone will love it!, 12. April 2000
Von 
First of all, I'm one of those kids who mentally cusses out the teacher every time a novel is assigned, reads two pages of it, then scrapes through each chapter quiz by flicking through my trusty Cliff's notes five minutes before class. But this time, something was different. I found myself actually staying awake whilst reading, and even (gasp!) ENJOYING the book! I was being lured through each section, entranced by the vivid depiction of the tragic downward spiral of the once-noble Compson family. Reading Faulkner's harrowing, in-depth studies into the minds of three very different yet equally fascinating siblings is like piecing a puzzle together. The so-called idiot (Benjy), the virginity-obsessed suicidal (Quentin), the spiteful demon (Jason) and their kindhearted servant (Dilsey) all focus on the beautiful, rebellious Caddie. In doing so, they reveal fascinating ideas about the human mind and society. Trust me, this book is truly thought provoking. My English grade of an 'A' now stands out like a sore thumb on my report card, just as this masterpiece does in a world full of books that will always be second best.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen The most amazing first chapter in all literature, 4. Januar 2000
Life is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury. The idiot narrating the first chapter is Benjy Compson, down syndrome adult, and the sound is his bellowing every time he is reminded of his beloved big sister Caddy, who no longer lives with him. Some of the fury comes from Quentin Compson, Caddy's oldest younger brother, who can't bear the thought of Caddy's boyfriends taking her to bed. There is more fury from youngest brother Jason Compson, an intolerable little brat who grows into a thoroughly evil adult. And there is Caddy's daughter Quentin (named after her uncle) who suffers the bullying of uncle Jason until she's had enough of it. She lives with uncle Jason and with her worthless, infuriatingly stupid grandmother.
The book is divided into four parts, each part told by a different person. Part One is told by Benjy, Part Two by brother Quentin, Part Three by devilish Jason, and Part Four by the black servant Dilsey, who has more sense than all the others combined.
Benjy's chapter may be the most amazing ever written. Faulkner gives it the oddest stream of consciousness structure. Benjy's mind constantly shifts from the present to the past. Faulkner wanted to minimize the confusion by color coding the paragraphs to let the reader know when Benjy was shifting from one time period to another, but the publisher didn't go along with color coding. All you have are a few italics as hints that something is changing. It's not enough. When you pick up this book you will need to pick up the Cliff Notes at the same time. Cliff Notes give an excellent and clear explanation of what in the hell is going on in the otherwise impossible to understand first section. Without the Cliff Notes, the sound and fury will refer to you smashing the book against a wall and screaming at Faulkner - Why are you putting me through this, you idiot! Why don't you just write in plain English! But with the Cliff Notes the chapter becomes really fascinating.
I'll give you a clue. Benjy is standing by a fence looking into an adjoining yard where people are playing golf. Benjy is supervised by one of Dilsey's children. If one of the golfers calls to his caddie, and the young black child then says Hush Benjy! that means that Benjy has just had his heart broken for the millionth time hearing his sister's name but not seeing her, and he is screaming his fool head off.
The first two parts of this book are like love letters to sister Caddy, who was expelled from the house for promiscuity. In this disfunctional family, promiscuity seems pretty understandable as an escape. The mother is a useless waste of protoplasm.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Mesmerizing!, 20. Juli 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Faulkner is quickly becoming a favorite author of mine, along with Toni Morrison, for they both right with a certain air of mystery. You know when you read the words that there are many hidden secrets behind them that will be revealed to you only at the appropriate time. They both force the reader to broaden their mind beyond the obvious and to delve into the souls of the characters. Faulkner's methods are spell-binding, literally forcing you to turn page after page. I couldn't put this book down.
All the characters in this book were flawed, but each had certain qualities that were also admirable. Caddy was, in the most basic sense, a very loving person, as evidenced by her enduring love for the mentally-challenged Benjy. Quentin (the male version), above all others, was noble and honorable. Jason, though harsh and racist, was loyal, even if he made those to whom he was loyal pay a price for his allegiance. Finally, Benjy, in his heart, was gentle and misunderstood--untouched by the vanity and prejudices that affected the other members of the family. Of course, they should all be thankful for Dilsey, whose deep devotion and conscience was all that kept this family going.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Magnificient Masterpiece, 18. Juni 2000
A rather simple plot of a southern family that has lost status is turned into a commentary on human nature and the individual both as part of society as well as an antagonist. Rather than glorifying unusual occurrences, everyday events are presented with their deserved importance. The diction which at more than one occasion is difficult to follow, ranges from simple to in occasions beautifully poetic.
I have been most impacted by books whose characters are not stereotyped or idealized, but contain human virtues as well as flaws. After finishing each section of The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner, I felt sorrow in abandoning the minds characters I had grown to care for, or grown to dislike. The words jumped out of the pages and embodied a friend, relative, acquaintance or enemy.
Told from the point of view of a 33-year-old mentally handicapped man, at first I dreaded the "Benjy" section. As I became accustomed to the "stream-of consciousness" point of view, the world and every day experience where revealed to me from an entirely different perspective. This perspective used only description of sensory perception as a tool of understanding. I had, for the first time, the opportunity to step into the shoes of someone whose actions I could have never comprehended.
The second section is written from the point of view of a brilliant 18-year-old college student named Quentin Compson. He loses himself in elaborate prose and imaginary conversations; his main concerns are those he cannot control: the passage of time, the changing and growing up of those around him and a contradictory society. Quentin holds on to his idealistic views but soon loses all hope as he replays in his mind his father's cynical arguments and faces a society where he feels he is misunderstood. While in the previous section his brother Benjy was unable to comprehend change, Quentin's flaw is his devotion to the past and unwillingness to change.
The third section is told from the point of view of Jason, the eldest brother who is left to care for Caddy's daughter. He is by all definiton san "unlovable character" who seems to have inherited his father's nihilistic and cynical nature, but with less intellectual pomposity and more practicality. However, a reader might be torn between hating this character and feeling pity for the life he is given. His parents sent Quentin to Harvard, while Jason must stay a simple businessman in his home town.
The fourth section is told from the servant's (Dilsey) point of view. This section is written differently than the others, marked by it's lack of stream-of-consciousness by adapting a more omnicient point of view. Dilsey is not stuck in the past like Benjy, or fears the future like Quentin...but she adjusts to living in the present and seems to be in complete control of her life.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen one of the greatest novels ever written, 20. Mai 2000
Sure, you need to do some work to appreciate this great novel, but many things in life require a bit of effort to appreciate. I disagree with the below reviewer who claims that if it takes work, it aint worth it. I would add that by far the most helpful companion to Faulkner's novel is the Twayne's Masterworks series (like Cliffs, only 1000 times better -- and they exist for many other great novels too). Like Wallace Stephens, Faulkner gives us four different version of the kernel of his story which in his words was our view of Caddie, the little girl who muddied her drawers, climbing up the pear tree. Faulkner gives Benjy, the 33 year old retard, the greatest gift of all -- speech! Though this first section, seen through Benjy's eyes, is confusing, Faulkner limits his vocabulary to just over a 100 or so words. My high school students this year in AP English voted this their favorite book of the year of the 11 or so novels we read. With a bit of background information, the reader's comprehension will be greatly aided. I'm going on my 15th reading and I'm happy to say the text yields up new insights every time. One of my all time favorite novels by anyone. I envy the first time reader experiencing sections I and II for the first time -- savor the experience.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen a very misunderstood book, 23. April 2000
after reading several of the customer reviews, i was interested to find that very few people are aware of the fact that the first two sections of the book are in a form of a stream of consciousness that consists of MULTIPLE changes. that is, especially in quentin's section, benjy and quentin tell the compson story through various events in the past, ranging from 1898 to 1928. the events benjy and quentin refer to can change from one word to the next. also, there is little or no punctuation. for example, benjy, the "man-child," will refer to "damuddy's death in one phrase, and the moment of his castration the next. although this is an excellent book, it is definitely NOT for everyone. to truly appreciate the sound and the fury, one must read it fairly slowly, deliberately, and with literary consideration. much like a clockwork orange, it takes a while to adjust to the style and technique, but it is well worth it, if you can stand it.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Groundbreaking American Novel of the Century, 22. April 2000
Von 
What could I possibly say besides this might very well be my all-time favorite book? This story of the fall of the Compson family, an aristocratic Southern family, mirrors the fall of the Old South after the Civil War. Faulkner is one of my favorite authors, and the way he changes the narrative viewpoint in this book is amazing. The first section of this book is told through the eyes of Benjy Compson, a thirty-three year old mentally retarded man. Only Faulkner could tell a story from this viewpoint. This section is incredibly difficult to read because it has no chronology: Benjy has no concept of time so he jumps from event to event as the story progresses. Often, he will make a jump of thirty years with little or no warning to the reader. The reader should not be discouraged from reading because of this; the reading gets progressively easier through the book, and future sections will also explain what happened in Benjy's section.
The second section is told by Quentin Compson on the day of his suicide. It may very well be the best use of stream of consciousness narration ever. It is filled with long, flowing thoughts, and there are even two sections where Faulkner disregards ALL punctuation to simulate the frantic pace of Quentin's obsessive thoughts.
The third section, told by Jason Compson, the "evil" brother, is my favorite; it is a darkly humorous masterpiece. Read it yourself to see what I mean. The fourth section is told by an omniscient third-person narrator, and this section contains Faulkner's trademark flowing prose.
I can't say enough good things about this book. It is an awesome book, rich in symbolism and imagery, and it contains many well-developed characters and themes. For this and for its groundbreaking experiments in narration, I consider The Sound and the Fury to be my favorite book of all time.
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The Sound And The Fury (Vintage Classics)
The Sound And The Fury (Vintage Classics) von William Faulkner (Taschenbuch - 19. Januar 1995)
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