Kundenrezensionen


12 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (11)
4 Sterne:    (0)
3 Sterne:
 (1)
2 Sterne:    (0)
1 Sterne:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


17 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Fascinating & accessible look at Language
The author calls language an "uninvented invention". This highly engaging, witty book is an attempt to uncover at least some of the secrets of language and to dismantle the stated paradox. He explains the meaning of `structure', argues that the present is the key to the past & explains why languages do not remain static. By drawing on recent discoveries in linguistics, he...
Veröffentlicht am 4. Januar 2009 von Pieter Uys

versus
3.0 von 5 Sternen Schrecklich detailverliebt, wenig faszinierendes, langatmig
Sorry, liebe sprachwissenschaftliche Connaisseurs, mir hat das Buch in der Summe nicht gefallen. An Guy Deutschers tiefen linguistischen Fachkenntnissen wage ich natürlich nicht zu rütteln, er ist mit Sicherheit eine Koryphäe auf seinem Gebiet und ich würde es nicht wagen ihn als Sprachwissenschaftler auch nur ansatzweise zu bewerten. Das Buch aber,...
Vor 9 Monaten von Pj veröffentlicht


‹ Zurück | 1 2 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

17 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Fascinating & accessible look at Language, 4. Januar 2009
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Unfolding of Language (Taschenbuch)
The author calls language an "uninvented invention". This highly engaging, witty book is an attempt to uncover at least some of the secrets of language and to dismantle the stated paradox. He explains the meaning of `structure', argues that the present is the key to the past & explains why languages do not remain static. By drawing on recent discoveries in linguistics, he explores the forces of destruction, creation and the innate structure of language. It is revealed that the source of grammatical elements like case markers, pre- & post-positions and tense markers is the mundane words like inter alia `hand' and `go'.

Chapter One: Castles In The Air, takes a close look at the structure of language, whilst the following chapter: Perpetual Motion, demonstrates linguistic development and change with particular reference to English, German, French and the Indo-European language family as a whole. Chapter Three: Forces Of Destruction, is a further investigation of how and why changes in sound and meaning take place, with many examples from Indo-European.

Chapter Four examines interesting verbs like "to have/to hold" and the concepts of space & time in linguistic expression. All languages use spatial terms to describe temporal relations, revealing that space-time is deeply entrenched in human cognition. A metaphor is a way of describing something by comparing it to something else, and is an indispensable element in thought-processing. The stream of metaphors flowing through language moves from the concrete to the abstract. Language consists of layer upon layer of metaphors that are as common in plain conversation as in sublime poetics.

Chapter Five: Forces Of Creation, is a discussion of how new words and structures arise, how meanings change and the multiple ways in which languages are enriched by these developments. It was interesting to learn, for example that the conjunction `but' derives from Old English `be-utan' ("by the outside").

Chapter Six looks at the need for order in languages and contains lots of interesting information on the intricate Semitic verbal system. In essence, the effects of erosion interact with the mind's craving for order. There is thus a constant search for regular patterns and spontaneous analogical innovations arise. This is based on erosion + expressiveness and erosion + analogy.

The final chapter brings it all together and includes detailed discussions of the common sources out of which possessives, quantifiers, plural markers & articles may develop, the various interactions of verbs & nouns, and the nuances of action like tenses (past, present, future, continues & completed), and modality (should, ought, etc.). Adverbs and subordinate clauses are also discussed.

In the Epilogue, Deutscher revisits the mind's desire for order and the fact that innovation is based on a principle of recycling. He also discusses the movement towards simplification in the word structure of the Indo-European languages over thousands of years in terms of cyclical & linear time. Proto Indo-European had eight cases for nouns in the singular, dual & plural while the modern daughter languages have few left and there is a marked decline in the fusion of words.

This highly entertaining read is accessible to the non-linguist and explains many fascinating features of language and its structure. There are five appendices, copious notes, a bibliography and glossary of terms. The book concludes with an index. The text is enhanced by figures, illustrations and photographs, including an aerial view of the ruins of & an artist's impression of Hattusa in its heyday plus portraits of the Brothers Grimm and Sir William Jones who discovered the relationship of Sanskrit to Greek & Latin.

Appendix A provides more info on the flipping of word categories with reference to the word `go' which functions both as a verb and an auxiliary marking the future tense. Appendix B revisits the role of laryngeal consonants in the Semitic languages that changed the vowels I and U in their vicinity into A and the consequences of the phenomenon.

The next appendix elaborates on the complicated Semitic verbal templates with reference to how reflexives, intensives, causatives, passives & passive reflexive forms originated. Appendix D looks at how the ambiguity of pronouns as to referent may be solved; for example, by harnessing the emphatic `self' to function as a reflexive.

The final appendix, The Turkish Mirror, deals with the convergence of all languages into two opposing word-order camps. Joseph Greenberg made this discovery in the 1960s. The word-order arrangement results from the positioning of one particular couple, the verb and the object. The early choice between VO or OV determines whether pre- or postpositions will be employed and ripples throughout the entire structure of a language to determine, amongst others, the possessive construction where the two nouns arrange themselves to correspond with pre- or post-positions.

I also recommend On the Origin of Languages & A Guide to the World's Languages by Merritt Ruhlen, A Language History of the World by Nicholas Ostler and the work of that great pioneer of language classification, Professor Joseph Greenberg, especially Language Universals & Indo-European and Its Closest Relatives: The Eurasiatic Language Family.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


8 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Spannend, kurzweilig, lehrreich, 21. Juni 2011
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Unfolding of Language (Taschenbuch)
Deutscher bringt etwas in der Populärwissenschaft sehr Seltenes fertig: Er kann auch komplexe Inhalte bildhaft und klar darstellen, ohne die Intelligenz seiner Leser zu beleidigen. Seine Thesen sind überzeugend und werden in allen Einzelheiten belegt. Ausserdem überlässt der Autor es seiner Leserschaft mittels eines umfangreichen Anhangs, sich in bestimmte Themen zu vertiefen.

Wer sich für Sprache interessiert, ohne in die unergründlichen Tiefen der theoretischen Linguistik hinabsteigen zu wollen, ist mit diesem Buch perfekt bedient.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Analysing the uninvented invention, 18. Juli 2005
The author calls language an "uninvented invention". This very engaging book is an attempt to uncover at least some of the secrets of language and to dismantle the stated paradox. By drawing on recent discoveries in linguistics, Deutscher explores the elusive forces of creation, change and the innate structure of language. In addition, he investigates the way that the elaborate conventions of communication develop in human society. This cultural evolution means the emergence of behavioural codes that are passed on from generation to generation.
Chapter One: Castles In The Air, takes a close look at the structure of language, whilst the following chapter: Perpetual Motion, demonstrates linguistic development and change with particular reference to English, German, French and the Indo-European language family as a whole. Chapter Three: Forces Of Destruction, is a further investigation of how and why changes in sound and meaning take place, with many examples from Indo-European. Chapter Four examines interesting verbs like "To have/to hold" and the concepts of space and time in linguistic expression.
Chapter Five: Forces Of Creation, is a discussion of how new words and structures arise, how meanings change and how languages are enriched by these developments. Chapter Six looks at the need for order in languages and contains lots of interesting information on the Semitic family and its intricate verbal system. In essence, the effects of erosion interact with the mind's craving for order. There is thus a constant search for regular patterns and spontaneous analogical innovations arise. This is based on erosion + expressiveness and erosion + analogy.
The final chapter brings it all together and includes detailed discussions of possessives, quantifiers, plural markers, articles and the various interactions of verbs and nouns. This highly entertaining read is accessible to the non-linguist and explains many fascinating features of language and its structure. There are five appendices, copious notes, a bibliography and glossary of terms. The book concludes with an index.
I also recommend On The Origin Of Languages by Merritt Ruhlen, How To Kill A Dragon by Calvert Watkins, and the work of that great pioneer of language classification, Professor Joseph Greenberg.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen fascinating, 19. Dezember 2010
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Unfolding of Language (Taschenbuch)
one would think that a book about language is bound to be boring but quite the contrary. it is fascinating, funny, interesting and easy to read, even if english is not ones mother tongue.
some comments open your eyes about things you kind of guessed or knew before, but this time with scientific background, and you start listening a bit closer.
a great book for everyone who is interested in language and its "invention"
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


6 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen An inspiring book, 4. März 2010
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Unfolding of Language (Taschenbuch)
The book 'The Unfolding of Language' describes the principles along which language evolves.
Using intriguing examples, the author demonstrates how these principles materialize in the
development of current language as well as languages
of the past such as Sumerian or Akkadian. Personally, I, being no linguist myself,
was very impressed by the demonstration of the creative power of the forces
of destruction, which tend to erode the complexity of language, but, as is shown, can themselves be
the source of new, complicated structure. In the end, all the ideas are combined to sketch the
evolution of a toy language from rudimentary beginnings to an elaborate system.

A book full of inspiring ideas, clearly recommendable.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Entertaining, 23. Februar 2014
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Unfolding Of Language (Kindle Edition)
This is a funny book which one reads very quickly. A large part of it( ca. 30%) are appendices at the end, which i haven`t read. But it illustrates the way languages evolve in a generally pleasant manner. I recommend it to people looking for an interesting, informative and not lacking a sense of humour book.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


3.0 von 5 Sternen Schrecklich detailverliebt, wenig faszinierendes, langatmig, 21. Dezember 2013
Von 
Pj - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 1000 REZENSENT)    (VINE®-PRODUKTTESTER)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Unfolding of Language (Taschenbuch)
Sorry, liebe sprachwissenschaftliche Connaisseurs, mir hat das Buch in der Summe nicht gefallen. An Guy Deutschers tiefen linguistischen Fachkenntnissen wage ich natürlich nicht zu rütteln, er ist mit Sicherheit eine Koryphäe auf seinem Gebiet und ich würde es nicht wagen ihn als Sprachwissenschaftler auch nur ansatzweise zu bewerten. Das Buch aber, das hat mir nicht gefallen.

Warum:
- elendslange Kapitel, die eigentlich nichts bahnbrechend neues aufzeigen. (Sprache ist nicht statisch sondern hat sich immer verändert, durch Fremdeinflüsse, linguistischer Faulheit, Usus und weitere Dinge)
- am Anfang war das konkrete, daraus abgeleitet folgt das Abstrakte
- ein geradezu unverschämt langes Kapitel in dem ein sprachwissenschaftliche Diskurs abgedruckt wird, der aber für den Laien ohne jedes Aha Erlebnis bleibt
- überhaupt - wo sind sie, die Aha Erlebnisse? Die Momente in denen man sich denken hört "Mensch, das habe ich mir doch irgendwie schon immer gedacht, hier schreibt es mal jemand ganz leicht verständlich auf"

Mir ist das ganze Buch so vorgekommen als wolle mir der Autor ganz aufgeregt die Entdeckung des Heiligen Grals nahebringen und ich will und will immer nur ein gewöhnliches Weinglas sehen. Zweifelsohne liegt der Fehler bei mir, aber ich könnte mir vorstellen dass es nicht nur mir so geht (in Amazon UK scheint es zumindest ähnlich gesinnte zu geben). Wer nicht zu einem elitären Kreis an Linguisten gehört und sich an den kleinen Fach-Feinheiten zutiefst erfreut, für den ist das Buch aus meiner Sicht eher langatmig und mühsam. Allerdings versteckt sich dann doch zwischendrin immer wieder eine interessante Kleinigkeit, wie z.B. die Flexionen in Arabisch und damit das aufkeimen eines Verständnisses für eine sehr fremde Sprache. Das aber eben sehr dosiert, da das Buch aber aus meiner Sicht ein popilärwissenschaftliches Ansinnen hat kann ich nur eine Dreisternebewertung geben.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen page turner, 10. Dezember 2013
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Unfolding Of Language (Kindle Edition)
Ich habe dieses Buch auf Empfehlung einer meiner Dozentinnen hin gekauft. Normalerweise lese ich keine Sachbücher, aber nachdem sie so davon geschwärmt hat und es als Kindleversion so günstig war...

Es ist wirklich extrem interessant! Deutscher schreibt sehr lustig und einfach, sodass man auch als Normalsterblicher versteht, um was es geht. Ich musste mehrfach laut auflachen (was mir sonst nur sehr selten passiert. Vor allem, wenn ich gerade im Bus sitze).

Ich empfehle diese Buch allen weiter, die sich für Sprachwissenschaft und speziell für die Entwicklung der Sprache interessieren. Ich lege den unentschlossenen Käufern auch wärmstens ans Herz, es auf englisch zu kaufen. Ich kann mir nicht vorstellen, dass es auf deutsch sooo gut ist, wie auf englisch.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Sehr interessant, 4. Dezember 2013
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Unfolding Of Language (Kindle Edition)
Vom selben Autor wie "Through the Language Glass", überraschende Einsichten in die Entwicklung der Sprachen, sehr verständlich geschrieben und unterhaltsam zu lesen.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen I love it, 3. Dezember 2013
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Unfolding of Language (Taschenbuch)
Perfect book for a language enthousiasts. Easy and interesting and entertaining. I would recommend it to anyone interested in linguistics.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 2 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

The Unfolding of Language
The Unfolding of Language von Guy Deutscher (Taschenbuch - 25. Juli 2006)
EUR 11,80
Auf Lager.
In den Einkaufswagen Auf meinen Wunschzettel
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen