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5.0 von 5 Sternen Life-changing!
This is a five-star book if ever I have read one! I am a Presbyterian minister and, other than scripture, this is the most formative book I have read in my life (and I have read lots of books!). I first read this book fourteen years ago when taking my daughter to gymnastics class. Each week as she tumbled and climbed, I read and savored a chapter of this book and was...
Veröffentlicht am 27. März 2000 von Thomas A. Sweet

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3.0 von 5 Sternen A Book Worth Reading
"Pilgrim at Tinker Creek," by Annie Dillard, is not a captivating, exciting book that you cannot tear your eyes away from, but it certainly is worth the sometimes tedious hours of reading. There were moments I grew bored and the page numbers slowly swept by, there were moments I laughed aloud because of her wonderful sense of humor, and there were moments I...
Veröffentlicht am 24. April 2000 von Anna Dougherty


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5.0 von 5 Sternen Life-changing!, 27. März 2000
This is a five-star book if ever I have read one! I am a Presbyterian minister and, other than scripture, this is the most formative book I have read in my life (and I have read lots of books!). I first read this book fourteen years ago when taking my daughter to gymnastics class. Each week as she tumbled and climbed, I read and savored a chapter of this book and was forever changed. "Pilgrim at Tinker Creek" is about seeing, really seeing, seeing deeply. It is about awe and wonder, without which we cannot be truly human. It is about the interconnectedness of all life. This book has caused me to "see" God, life, myself in a much "bigger," more profound way than I did before having read it. I have given away dozens of copies over the years, and I am writing this review because I came to this site to order another copy for a teenager in my church and wanted to add my "witness." I wish I could afford to buy you your copy, too!
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4.0 von 5 Sternen My Review, 2. Mai 2000
I was assigned to read Annie Dillard's Pilgrim at Tinker Creek for my AP English III class. We had just finished reading Henry David Thoreau's Walden, or Life In The Woods a few weeks prior, and our teacher had told us that Dillards writing style was similar to Thoreau's. Now, I'm not a big Thoreau fan (as my test grade proves), so this was not consoling to me. Over spring break I picked up the book and began to read it. She starts simply "I used to have a cat, an old fighting tom, who would jump through the open window by my head in the middle of the night and land on my chest." From that sentence on, I was hooked. There are two parts to this book, a via positiva, and a via negativa. The beginning is filled with life, positive imagery, and numerous quotes from Thoreau and van Gough. Dillard covers her perspectives on Heaven and earth, seeing, winter, and "the fixed" in this section using such qualities as listed before. The via negativa begins somewhere in
chapter five or six. It creeps in, slowly taking over the positive images and feelings, until you finally find that you are reading about children abusing newts in a state park, or caterpillars walking in the same circle around the same vase for seven full days, because their leader was taken away without their knowledge. Death is a reoccurring theme here. A main question in my class was what happened to make her change styles? Was it planned, or was it the effect of some event--the death of a friend or loved one perhaps? Either way, we read on through the spring and summer, and into the fall. She leads us into a flood, where she says, "I like crossing the dam. If I fall, I might not get up again...I face this threat every time I cross the dam, and it is always exhilarating." Her aesthetic sense of word choice described the monarch butterfly, "A monarch at rest looks like a fleck of tiger, stilled and wide-eyed." We notice though that while she uses such
descriptive tone, it is more heavily applied during the via negativa section. The most enjoyable sections for me were her beginning statements, which were filled with stories. Her old tom cat, life's hidden treasures, and even the history of the starlings can be found in the opening paragraphs of each chapter. This catches the attention of the reader, because it is written in an intimate tone, and it prepares them for what lies ahead. Such stories or memories usually reoccur in the end, bringing her point full-circle. Dillard's perspective on religion is questionable. She appears to favor both religion and creationism throughout the book, yet she never sides with one more so than the other. She uses biblical references to Jacob's cattle, a scripture from the Koran, but then also personifies nature, giving it actions of its own free will. She knows stories from the Bible, yet she knows just as much about evolution. A pro-creation/ Christian perhaps? This _was_ written during the 1970's. Perhaps Annie Dillard and Henry David Thoreau do have the same writing-style. Personally I found Thoreau too redundant and long-winded, while Dillard is more natural. One can almost hear her talking; her stories included in the book as reference to a pervious statement are filled with the tone of her voice, although we have never heard her speak. That's a quality she has, making the readers feel as if they have known her for years after reading the book. So why should someone who doesn't take AP English III read Pilgrim at Tinker Creek? Simple. It makes you look at life differently. It gives you a new respect for nature, and a new knowledge of insects and animals. It's good material for anyone doing a report on Eskimos. But overall, it will open your mind to a philosophical side of nature.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen PATC Review, 25. April 2000
I am a high school junior doing a review of the Annie Dillard classic, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek. This review is being written about the aspects of the book that I feel stand out about the writing technique, content, and my view of the author. This book was extremely descriptive when it came to anything that was part of nature. Dillard has a massive love for nature, and she uses a lot of similes to describe what she sees. The book as a whole seems to progress from cheerful to confusingly upset to a happy medium. The author seems to magically switch in the middle of the book from optimistic to pessimistic. This sudden switch should have had a more clear separation than just stopping one and starting the other without telling the reader. The book refers to this change as "via postiva" to "via negativa". Whether she intended for it to come out this way or not I cannot say, but I can say that I don't like the "half of the book good and the other half bad" style of writing. I don't like the technique because, for the second part of the book (the negative half), I didn't enjoy reading all that depressing and disgusting literature. Dillard should have just blended the two views together as she was writing. At the beginning of the book Dillard grabs you through her somewhat extreme use of similes. The reader can hardly turn the page without running into at least a handful of similes describing everything under the sun. The reader's mind is never given a chance to rest or doze off because it is constantly picturing these images described in the book. This is one of the best characteristics of the book. I feel that this is her trademark throughout the entire novel. Without the bombardment of similes I believe that the book would have been boring and somewhat reminiscent of Thoreau's Walden. For some people that would be torture. Dillard skillfully utilizes fresh new, creative words. She uses words you don't her everyday. She uses words that are only known by people with college degrees in the field of English. The words she uses are extremely complex at times and just plain interesting at others. Many of times the readers may have to use context clues to decipher out the meaning. I enjoy this, though, because it is a challenge to me to guess the meaning of the word. The advanced diction also ties into the similes and description of nouns. These fresh words make the picture in your mind that much more beautiful because your mind has to think harder to picture a word it hasn't heard before. Then, when the mind figures out what the word means, it is that much more intelligent. Personally, I liked the book overall, even though parts of it were gross or confusing. The only down side to it is the negative chapters towards the end of the book. However, the last chapter saved the day because the author seemed to find some kind of answers to the questions racking her brain. Had it not been for this last chapter, I would have really not liked the book. It the second half of the book was so negative and I am glad it finished somewhere in between happy and confusingly sad. Another observation that sticks out in my mind is that she writes nothing like Thoreau. Before I read the book, I had heard a lot of talk that Thoreau and Dillard were extremely similar. I am here to put that to rest. Dillard is much more interesting in her writing. She can say something in less than a page. Thoreau, on the other hand, enjoyed using two or three pages to get a point across to the reader. I give this book 4 out of 5 stars and two thumbs up. This is a great book for someone who likes philosophy and description more than action and adventure.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen A Book Worth Reading, 24. April 2000
"Pilgrim at Tinker Creek," by Annie Dillard, is not a captivating, exciting book that you cannot tear your eyes away from, but it certainly is worth the sometimes tedious hours of reading. There were moments I grew bored and the page numbers slowly swept by, there were moments I laughed aloud because of her wonderful sense of humor, and there were moments I sat deep in thought about her questions and ideas. The most interesting aspect, and perhaps the main purpose for the book, is Dillard's search for the truth about God. She tells us in the Afterword that the book is divided into two sections; "via positiva" and "via negativa." Dillard proves to be more positive than negative throughout the book. She seems to believe there is a God because she often refers to Him; however, she seems to refrain from taking faith and trusting God. The question may not be so much; "is there a God", but "what is God's purpose?" She introduces this idea in the very beginning: "Was the sense of it there and God absconded with it...?" (p.9) Here she proposes that God abandoned us or that He spread to a more distant place, away from our sight. This is the main problem for Dillard; like many, she must see to believe. "Any copperhead anywhere is an archer in cover; how much more so is God! Invisibility is the all-time great cover' and that the one infinite power deals so extravagantly and unfathomably in death... makes that power an archer." (p.91) She seems to profess that there is a God, He is simply invisible to our eyes. This quote brings in another major topic of Dillard's book - death. She is constantly focusing on the death of any living creature. Like God, this is something we cannot understand and have no control over. "My rage and shock at the pain and death of individuals of my kind is the old, old mystery, as old as man, but forever fresh, and completely unanswerable." (p.181) She does not understand death, just as she does not understand God, therefore she links the two together. So, is God our creator who has abandoned us, yet hovers somewhere far away and pierces us with the arrows of death? Dillard seems to acknowledge God's presence on this earth: "Come on out!...I know you're there." (p.207) She speaks of Moses on Mount Sinai and quotes a Bible verse: "Surely the Lord is in this place and I knew it not." (p.208) As for His purpose I am unclear of Dillard's conclusion. Perhaps she finds Him to be precisely what she described; the "creator" and "archer." He gives life and death. From a less analytical point of view, Dillard's description of nature and intriguing stories are wonderful. She writes peaceful images: "I am the skin of water the wind plays over; I am petal, feather, stone." (p.203) Her focus on nature is intricate and she is sure to include every detail. "Water striders patrol the surface film, crayfish hump along the silt bottom eating filth, frogs shout and glare, and shiners and small bream hide among roots from the sulky green heron's eye." (p.7) Her observations cast a new light on the world. When I walk barefoot in the grass, I no longer think simply of the feel of the grass, but of the tiny creatures scrambling along the earth under the treading of my feet. I must agree with Dillard when she says, "I am more alive than all the world." (p.79) This is truly an excellent book. It opens the mind to new realms of thought and the eyes to new corners of the world. "The vision comes and goes, mostly goes, but I live for it, for the moment when the mountains open and a new light roars in spate through the crack, and the mountains slam." (p.36) The light surely does shine through and the mountains do slam for anyone who dares to venture into the world at Tinker Creek
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Nature in a Different View, 23. April 2000
Von Ein Kunde
After reading Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Annie Dillard, you will never look at nature the same way again. Her details are never ending and are so unique you feel like you are sitting in a field listening to her talk about her experiences. Her sense of care is much more deep than most people. Many citizens are uninterested about your life, but Dillard is over excited about these adventures. She is very honest throughout the book, and really justifies her thoughts well. Her feelings about religion are also a large part of the book. She believes in God, but wonders sometimes what he really does mean. Doesn't everyone do that? Her details are never-ending in that they explain everything from every dusty corner to things that you never would think about, or want to hear: "I scraped away the smooth snow. Hand fashioned of red clay, and now frozen, the bump was about six inches high and eighteen inches across. The slope, such as it was, was gentle; tread marks stitched to the clay."
This example from page 50, first full paragraph, is a wonderful illustration of how thorough she is in her writing. Instead of saying the bump was small and sloping, she decides to write with more action and feeling in the sentences. This helps the reader feel like she is actually there and enjoying the nature around her. Her interest in creatures seems to be unlimited . I have never seen anyone so interested in the concern of insects. The following passage shows this unending love of creatures: "Under the ice the bluegills and carp are still alive; this far south the ice never stays on the water long enough that fish metabolize all the oxygen and die. Farther north, fish sometimes die in this way and float up to the ice, which thickens around their bodies and holds them fast, open-eyed, until the thaw."
This section from page 48, first full paragraph, demonstrates care in that she knows so much information about fish and their habitats. This illustrates care and concern for so many in not just fish in general, but animals as a whole. So many times people ask us why, but we never really do have an answer, but it seems not to be the case for Dillard. She can justify anything with a credible answer. This passage shows her talent in answering questions to her full capability: "Is our birthright and heritage to be, like Jacob's cattle on which the life of a nation was founded, "ring-streaked, speckled and spotted" not with the spangling marks of a grace like beauty rained down from eternity, but with the blotched assaults and quarryings of time?"
This passage from Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, page 242, continued paragraph, is an example of her justification. Even though she may have the story's background confused from the Bible, she does relate to "Jacob's cattle" several times. This gives the book strength and depth in that she knows her information. Religion is a big factor throughout the book. Dillard states what she thinks is equitable. Many of her statements speak that she is a believer, but she does ask what He means several times. Page 90, third paragraph, shows a great deal of Dillard's feelings: "I have never understood why so many mystics of all creeds experience the presence of God on mountaintops. Aren't they afraid of being blown away? God said to Moses on Sinai that even the priests, who have access to the Lord must hallow themselves, for fear that the Lord may break out against them. This is the fear. It often feels best to lay low, inconspicuous, instead of waving your spirit around from high places like a lightning rod. For if God is in one sense the igniter, a fireball that spins over the ground of continents, God is also in another sense the destroyer, lightening, blind power, impartial as the atmosphere. Or God is one 'G.' You get a comforting sense, in a curved hollow place, of being vulnerable to only a relatively narrow column of God as air."
The passage is extremely strong throughout and makes the reader reread the section. It is very deep and thoughtful. Dillard seems to have a awfully strong interest in the power of God. This subject and nature really brings about energy for the audience that is unusual in most authors. Annie Dillard writes exceptionally strong in Pilgrim at Tinker Creek. She mentions exceedingly sturdy statements, which justify her thoughts, but she is concerned and caring for the things around her. Her details throughout help make readers more involved in the book. They feel like they lived with her during the past five years. Religion has a large impact on Dillard's view of nature. She feels that very day should be appreciated and welcomed.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Giving the World a New Look, 16. April 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Pilgrim at Tinker Creek (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Annie Dillard's book, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, is a different view on life. She goes beyond what any normal, sane person would see and understand. This book is not for the ordinary reader who likes action packed thrillers. Pilgrim at Tinker Creek introduces a philosophical style of thinking to the natural world as well as the spiritual world. Dillard's tone and selection of detail make for a humorous venture into the realm of her thoughts. Dillard explores her spiritual beliefs and challenges the reader to struggle with many of the same concepts that apparently plagued herself during this time of her life. The first step to reading this book and actually enjoying it is to figure out her tone. Annie Dillard is a humorous, playful lady. Over half of her stories and allusions will have some significance and will more than likely have a funny ending or point! One freshest in memory is be in Chapter 9, which is titled "Flood." Dillard states in a sarcastic tone, "The kids have spotted a rattlesnake draping itself out of harm's way in a brush; now they all want to walk over the brick wall to the bush, to get bitten by the snake." (page 157 of The 25th Anniversary Edition) Her tone in that chapter particularly is satirical. Most of the humor in the book has to be interpreted in a sillier tone. Dillard is crazy! Annie Dillard's best tool for capturing the reader's thoughts is her never ending onslaught of surprises. If it's not the allusions, then it's her lack of sparing details. In between her immature stories, there is a show of seriousness. She has an almost divine interest for the natural processes that go about their clandestine way until she uncovers their secret world. On page 55 of The 25th Anniversary Edition of Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, she discovers a praying mantis egg. Suddenly it is as if she could not help but notice them, but wait until you find out how she reacts when she discovers how those eggs are created and the reproductive ceremonies of the mantis! Dillard's approach to this aspect of life is like that of an innocent child. Don't expect her to spare any details! Later on, in chapter 10, she is a tell-all with no hold-backs. A noticeable difference in her tone can be sensed in this chapter, too! The most important purpose of this book is the philosophical values that will be gained. It has been said several times that once someone reads this book, they will never see the world the same way again. Of all of the reviews that are out there, there is one thing that is not said often enough, and that is the importance of spiritual and religious meanings that are in the book. In fact, this is probably her main purpose in writing Pilgrim at Tinker Creek. There are two parts to this book. They are, of course, not literally divided but a noticeable difference nonetheless. Via positiva and Via negativa are two possible ways to view God. Dillard writes her own thoughts on both topics, and it appears that she has cataloged her own struggles in this book. Nearly all of her points are backed by quotes or a life experience. No one can fault her reasoning. Of all books that Pilgrim at Tinker Creek can be compared to, Walden is not one that would come up first on my list. Although both Dillard and Thoreau are transcendentalists, that focus on simplicity is not as apparent in Dillard's book. Yes, once a person reads this book, it is a life changing event. No one analyzes nature from such a thoughtful stand point as Dillard.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen A Credible Philosopher, 16. April 2000
In this American classic, Annie Dillard is obviously a well educated woman who is qualified to philosophize as she does. The purpose of her writing this account and spending so much time alone in nature is to discover herself and to develop her own idea of the role God plays in our lives. By the end of the novel, however, she seems to have only discovered the answer to one of the questions. She realizes that humans, herself included, are part of a never-ending, relentless cycle called nature. She never does fully grasp her understanding of God. While reading this book, it is easy to notice that Dillard is somewhat confused when it comes down to where eerything belongs in this huge cycle. Dillard notices every small detail available to the human eay, and finds a way to tie it all in together. She refers to scientific research to help support her ideas. The number of root hairs on one solitary tree is mentioned on page 166, as she is amazed at how vasst one tree can grow. Everything in life amazes Dillard as she is living her life of solitude. Chapter 4, "The Fixed," seems to be the point in time where Dillard begins to grasp the idea that all living and nonliveing matter is part of a cycle that will continue as long as God will allow it to: "Fish gotta swim and birds gotta fly; insects, it seems, gotta do one horrible thing after another." (p. 64) This line may not illustrate the point most effectively, but it shows how she believes. She now realizes that everything in nature has its place, or is fixed. The point Dillard is trying to get across is that somet things just don't change. As the book unfolds, it is obvious to the reader that Dillard is a well-educated woman. She often quotes from or alludes to writings she has read. It is dumbfounding to realize how many books she has actually read to be able to refer to as many as she does. By taking this into account, Dillard is credible on her philosophies. The most alluded to source Dillard uses is The Bible. She refers several times to Jacob's cattle and alludes to many of Jesus' parables as she writes. Not only does she use The Bible many times, but she also quotes Van Gough on numerous occasion, adding variety to her sources. Throughout the book, Dillard does some major soul searching. She is always trying to figure out what exactly God's role in our lives is. The first half of the book is written via poitiva, an omniscient view of God. The second half is written via negativa, a belief that God is in our lives, he's just not all that we claim him to be. She never answers this question that she has been asking herself all along, though. From this reader's standpoint, it appears as though she may ultimately be siding with the via positiva believers. It appears as though she knows that there has to be a dominant and omniscient power that sets the cycle that she refers to in motion. She also believes that evolution does have a hand in it, but she understands that in canno all happen on its own. The most effective writing technique Dillard uses is the telegraphic sentence. She starts many paragraphs with a short, less-than-one-line, sentence that sets the reader up for what is to come. One such example that truly captivates the reader's attention comes on page 131 when she begins a paragraph with, "You are God." The reader wants to read on to see just exactly what she has to say as humans play the role of God. Another technique evident in words is an abundance of similes. She makes comparisons that one would never think of if they hadn't read it here. On page 44 she compares the books she reads to stone men built by Eskimos. She does, however, connect the two and make a logical point. Dillard uses one metaphor throughout the entire book that is effective in showing how everything in nature is related. She refers to nature and life itself as a Mason jar that we are all stuck in together. This, in essence, refers back to the chapter entitled "The Fixed," because nature has to work, and there's nothing we can do about it. Every review that I have read of Dillard's writing has mentioned the similarities between herself and Thoreau. The do have their similarities, but they also have their differences. The are both extremely detailed and observant, but Dillard finds a way to tie her observations together. They both live in solitude to try to figure out who they really are, but Dillard leaves some questions unanswered. The list goes on and on. My AP Language and Composition class recently finished reading some work by Thoreau and has since read some by Dillard. I found the latter much more entertaining because it gives me a new outlook on nature. Thoreau did not inspire me as much as Dillard has. I now want to figure things out on my own and understand things that I normally ignore. The classic truly deserves the Pulitzer Prize it was awarded. I can honestly be called an American classic. Although some parts are somewhat slow, and, to be honest, boring, it all comes together eventually. Some chapters entertain, like "Flood," and some are very philosophical, like "The Fixed." Whatever the case may be, Dillard is able to make her points known and solidify them with allusions and quotes. Dillard is a well-educated woman with much credibility.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Looking for a different point of view? Try Pilgrim at Tinke, 16. April 2000
Are the sights you see in everyday life beginning to bore you? Would you like to find a new twist? Do you love a fresh, interesting, intrepid book? If all of these thoughts ring true, then Annie Dillard's Pilgrim at Tinker Creek beckons you to pick it up, open its cover, and begin reading. After just the first chapter, one will cast his or her own eyes upon the natural world unlike ever before.
Annie Dillard, a voracious reader, discusses, philosophizes, and shares her experience while living quietly and observantly in Virginia's Roanoke Valley on Tinker Creek. According to Dillard in the afterword of the book, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek possesses collectively two sides: the via positiva and the via negativa. Her inclusion of both sides of how one can envision God and His role in life exemplifies everything the book is about: showing all sides of the coin and at the same time looking at that coin as something completely different. Nature has not been this observed since Thoreau stayed at Walden Pond for two years. As my English teacher says, "You will never look at nature the same way ever again." It is true. The praying mantises, the grasshoppers, the sycamores, the meadows, the grasses, the creek, the morning, the afternoon, the evening, the fall, the winter, the spring, the summer, every tiny insect, the entire world around Tinker Creek - all of this comes to life to show the reader the truths about life's wonders. How at times we keep following the same path as the moth caterpillars or the fact that ten percent of all creatures are parasitic - these points and others like them are projected at the reader. It all comes through due to Dillard's own key elements.
What makes this book? Dillard has a unique style. Her conversational tone, telegraphic sentences, thought structure, similes and metaphors, and credible quotes - all play an important role in the reader's appreciation of this book. She is known to include a "So," "Alright," and even an "I don't know" which maintains the personal, down to earth personality of the novel. The telegraphic sentence prevails. A majority of Dillard's paragraphs begin with these short, concise, and to the point sentences. Their effect is unparalleled; one can understand the tone of the upcoming paragraph, argument, revelation, or idea. For instance, on page 45, the first sentence, "It snowed." By using this technique, the reader's mind can change lanes in the Pilgrim at Tinker Creek highway to the new mode of thought - in this case what the snow will bring. Observations - that is the key word of this novel. Whether it is the kids trying to make the snapping turtle snap, or her eloquent unmatched description of a mosquito drinking the blood of a copperhead, Dillard masterfully interweaves the reader's own personal relation to life. It's all in how she tells her life stories. In chapter 11, "Stalking," she describes her adventures of finally being able to watch muskrats. In discussing how she sometimes found muskrats easy to observe and then at other times difficult, she writes (page 202): "It is not always so easy. Other times I have learned that the only way to approach a feeding muskrat for a good look it to commit myself to a procedure so ridiculous that only a total unself-consciousness will permit me to live with myself. I have to ditch my hat, line up behind a low boulder, and lay on my belly to inch snake-fashion across twenty feet of bare field until I am behind the boulder itself and able to hazard a slow peek around it." This type of first person detail is what this novel is all about. Humor, sadness, depression, hope, joy - all these emotions pour out of her continuing observations. These observations set up her overall points on life by engaging the reader's to allow one's own personal relation to complement the point's point - and that's best the point!
Description, description, description - this would have to be Dillard's real-estate-like slogan. It's all about the description. It occurs "directly" like this selection from page 167, "The landscape of earth is dotted and smeared with masses of apparently identical individual animals, from the great Pleistocene herds that blanketed grasslands to the gluey gobs of bacteria that clog the lobes of lungs." Also, the captivating detail and feeling is transmitted through use of simile or metaphor, such as the one on page 96, "You are never really able to see it; you only feel its surge and thrust against our palm, as if you held a beating heart in a paper bag." It's fresh, invigorating, and most importantly it holds the reader's interest, attention, and drive to read.
Even with at times overwhelming complexity, this book reads better than chocolate tastes. The reader must stay on his or her toes though - allusions are everywhere. Jacob's cattle, millions of monkeys on millions of typewriters, magicians - these are just a few of the many a reader will encounter. These allusions bring the readers into the picture by throwing them something they know and can understand to better explain the current train of thought.
With all of this, the reader will be traveling the Annie Dillard's Mind Express. You will find out why she "patted the puppy," how life really is like a Mason jar, and how her own actions can create some fishy consequences. Van Gogh, one will discover, has some amazing quotes attributed to him. Upon completion, the reader can visualize all of Tinker Creek, from the Bings' home to the "Speedway." It is all due to Dillard's unshakable, individual, and original style. It's for the nature lover in us all. Pick up Pilgrim at Tinker Creek and see what muskrats do, how one "mothical" event can scar a child, and ultimately, how nature holds the key to unlocking the world's ironies, mysteries, explanations, reasons, and cycles.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen A Review For Life, 12. April 2000
A Review For Life
Annie Dillard is a truly marvelous writer. This book, however, is not marvelous. It is not good or great or brilliant. It isn't a story or even a collection of essays. No, it is more-more than marvelous, powerful, good, great, or brilliant. The piece is life. It is exactly what life is. What makes it life? Dillard's observations are explicit and intimate with the reader. She initiates each sight and strings her thoughts and feelings together as if she were weaving a web like one of the many spiders she mentions. As I began to read the book for an AP Jr. English class, I dreaded the monotonous tone and dry emotion, I felt I would have. The class had just finished Walden, yes a classic, but perhaps out of date as far as language and tone. The last thing I wanted to read was another Walden. I opened the book and started to read her lengthy and precise descriptions. I found myself continuing to read and actually understand her simple and varied diction. The book didn't have the old musty smell as Walden did. Dillard's view are fresh and original. Although I have enjoyed the work, most certainly the book is not for everyone as it shouldn't be. If there was such a book, what a dull world it would be. I still firmly believe that an author's writing is 95% for him/herself and 5% is for her/himself. My point is that writers write not always for the readers but mostly for themselves. This idea is seen in Dillard's work. Her constant themes of struggle and conflict: good vs. evil, creationism vs. evolution, and her vs. herself are defended well on each side. Through her observations of the natural world, she produces evidence for and against her opposing themes. If there is anything in the book that causes the reader to become agitated, it is the many unanswered questions Dillard poses. Though, in a sense, she makes her point that those very questions don't have and perhaps, don't need answers. Dillard explains, "...the creator loves pizzazz." This is the real Dillard. In each chapter, biblical illusions are made and create theological debates within the readers mind. With the mentioned quote, Annie Dillard alludes to God. This quote, however, could apply to the author, herself. She loves to be in utter awe, and enjoys all that goes on around her. Many have said that once someone reads this book, they will never look at nature the same again. I must agree. There are a mixture of reasons to read the book: its beautiful descriptions of nature, the unique observations about nature and life, the constant philosophy and theology throughout the book, and one last reason. No, not because the book won the Pulitzer Prize, nor because of its brilliance, but because of simply what it is. Pilgrim at Tinker Creek is simply pure truth.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A book dazzling with prose and mind-shattering knowledge!, 21. März 2000
Von 
"Cruelty is a mystery, and the waste of pain" (p.7). That is just one wonderful quote out of many that make up the bulk of Annie Dillard's Pulitzer winning Pilgrim at Tinker Creek. The book's themes are a combination, an amalgam, of natuure, science, philosophy, theology and mysticism. What is God's relationship to man? What is man's relationship to God? Although there are a lot of Christian elements imbued in (PTC), Dillard has a mystical view of life and creation as well -- a direct, unmeditated experience of the presence of God. In (PTC), nature, more often than not, is the stimulus that inspires the mystical union. The book has a permeating aura of panentheism to it, meaning, the natural world is contained within God but sees God extending beyond the natural world. God is both immanent and transcendent, both within the natural world and beyond it. Dillard uses the natural world, the insects, the minute organisms and animals of Tinker Creek and Tinker Mountain to try to answer a far greater question regarding humanity: how does the creation and destruction in the natural world relate to the human world? What is God's role in that? The themes are so complex but yet startlingly simple.God is the Creator of both horror and beauty. It is in both the former and latter where the human understanding comes to play; it is where the 'lesson' lies, if you will. (PTC) is a book that needs to be read more than once in order to fully comprehend it. The reader has to wait and digest what is being offered, as in (p. 258): "It is merely the slow cessation of the will's sprints and the intellect's chatter: it is waiting like a hollow bell with stilled tongue. Fuge, tace, quiesce. The waiting itself is the thing. That is so true about almost everything in life.
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Pilgrim at Tinker Creek (Harper Perrennial Modern Classics)
Pilgrim at Tinker Creek (Harper Perrennial Modern Classics) von Annie Dillard (Taschenbuch - 10. September 2013)
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