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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Outstanding!
This book is about a boy and a tree. The boy and tree go throughout life together. The tree is willing to give the boy everything that it has in order for him to be happy. In the end, the tree is left with nothing but a stump, with nothing to give the boy. However, the book ends on a happy note. The boy who is now an old man, says that all he needs is a place to sit...
Veröffentlicht am 7. Juli 2000 von Sonya

versus
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1.0 von 5 Sternen Inspiration - NOT !!!!! Selfish & ungrateful - YES!
I am with the minority of reviewers who thinks the selfishness of this boy to take and take and take without gratitude or returning the favor is appalling! When I read this with my 5 year old daughter, even she could see how selfish he was. I am amazed at the number of raves - I would never recommend this book and find it miles away from inspiring - what should it be...
Am 12. November 1998 veröffentlicht


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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Outstanding!, 7. Juli 2000
Von 
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Giving Tree (Gebundene Ausgabe)
This book is about a boy and a tree. The boy and tree go throughout life together. The tree is willing to give the boy everything that it has in order for him to be happy. In the end, the tree is left with nothing but a stump, with nothing to give the boy. However, the book ends on a happy note. The boy who is now an old man, says that all he needs is a place to sit and rest. The stump gladly assists him one last time. This is a very inspirational book. I absolutely love this book. I feel that it teaches so many morals and depicts real-life very effectively. This book can be used to teach many lessons. It deals with feelings, relationships, and stages of life. There are so many different topics, which could be taught by using this book. Silverstein depicts the ways in which we need one another for various things, whether it be physical or materialistic. I rate this book-5 stars!
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen It's more fortunate to give than to take., 15. Mai 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Giving Tree (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Having read the book a few times, I let my 7-year old son read it. His first response, upon completion, is "the boy is selfish", a fair and natural comment from a child of his age. During the subsequent discussion with him, it is not my goal to change his view towards the boy, but to add to him different perspectives of the story, perhaps the title of the book to start with. It is "The Giving Tree", not "The Selfish Boy",not"The Taking Boy"....
In the traditional Chinese belief, there is the saying "It's more fortunate to give than to take". It is normally the rich gives the poor; the physically competent helps the physically handicapped. It is, however,difficult today in our part of the world (I believe, so do most developed and developing cities) to bring our children to appreciate the intrinsic value behind this belief.
Taking is a pleasure apparently to most children. What about giving? Do our children have enough giving exposure before or after one or many taking experience? Unfortunately, my son doesn't, even though he did comment the boy selfish.
To highlight,in the book, the tree was happy everytime the boy came to it. To be able to offer something unconditionally to the boy everytime is a pleasure. The tree wanted the boy to come back and wanted to give more. There is nothing wrong with the tree, but neither with the boy to be offered and to take. It is just that the boy, or the author did not write intentionally, that the boy has never expressed any gratitude to the tree or to offer something in return. Does it matter so long as the tree was happy, happy to give?
I read a review from a California's reader and quite understand where he/she comes from when he/she said a book on "love without conditions" is not one he/she would give any child. This is the concern of most parents/teachers.
The value of this book to young readers will only exist if we parents/teachers bring our children to different perspectives under our support in reviewing the philosophy of "The Giving Tree". I enjoy reading the book and, having talked with my son, I become confident of recommending this book to those who want children learn the beauty of giving.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A Timeless Classic, 4. Mai 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Giving Tree (Gebundene Ausgabe)
The Giving Tree is a book about friendship and devotion. I find it sad that people choose to rip apart such a touching book and over-analyze it so much that its meaning is completely misconstrued.
Shel Silverstein honestly tells the story of a friendship between a boy and a tree that spans their relationship from childhood to old age. It is a timeless book that when we're children, reminds us of the importance of sharing, giving and unconditional love. As adults, it reminds us that it might take a lifetime to realize what is truly important in life and that we always seem to return to where we belong.
I love this book even more now than I did as a child, but it is appropriate for any age. I read it to my 2 and 6 year old cousins and they adored it. I read it aloud for a college class and they loved it. I gave it to a very special friend as a birthday gift and he has always treasured it. Mr. Silverstein gave us a special treat when he wrote this book. I only wish that he was still here to give us more like it.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Many Layers to This Story, Just Like a Tree's Many Rings, 16. August 2007
Von 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Giving Tree (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Stories are one of the oldest and most intense forms of human learning. The Giving Tree has all of the elements of the kind of mythical story that provides sustenance to all who tell and listen to the story throughout their lives. A person aged 93 can enjoy it as much as a 3 year old, yet in a totally different way.

The story begins like this:

"Once there was a tree . . .

and she loved a little boy."

At the most obvious level, then this is a story about the joys of love . . . and the pleasures of being loved. The experience is clearest when the boy is youngest.

"And every day the boy would come . . . ."

Whenever the boy came when he was little, that brought the tree happiness.

"And the tree was happy."

The tree shares many resources with the boy, and takes back companionship as her reward. This message is reinforced by the fact that the tree is always happy when the boy (now a man) returns less often) . . . except when he takes the tree's trunk.

As a literal object, the tree obviously also stands for nature's bounty . . . as long as we don't take too much, it will continue to provide for us. But calling the tree "she" also suggests that perhaps the tree stands for a metaphor for a mother or grandmother, either in the family or as Mother Nature.

The story is obviously written from the tree's perspective. All the scenes have the tree in it. So we are to learn from the tree's experiences.

The tree always gives the boy what he wants. But is it always good for the boy? It's hard to tell, but we have a clue that it may not be. The boy who wanted branches for a house to have a wife and family, later just wants a boat to leave. This suggests that something went wrong with his plan. But nature and your family will always take you in, subject to the resources they have remaining.

But what is the message for the little boy? He is happiest when with the tree while small. When older, he wants many things, but they don't seem to provide him with happiness that lasts. Although he gets all the material possessions the tree can give, it helps him less than the tree's companionship.

Clearly, the little boy is hardly a noble character except when pure in his devotion to the tree. If you are like me, you will have a negative reaction to the boy man taking the tree's trunk for a boat. That's just asking too much. But unconditional love provides it, as undefended nature cannot deny humans either.

At another level though, the balance is redressed by the aged man's physical decline.

"I am very tired."

"Sit down and rest."

"And the boy did."

Even as a stump, the tree can help the boy old man. The boy old man can no longer chew apples, nor build houses, nor make boats. They are at one again.

"And the tree was happy."

Perhaps one of the greatest messages of the tree is that there is such a thing as unconditional love. Children are often not sure about their parents in this regard. The parent who reads this story to a daughter or son will have gone a long way toward sending the message that he or she is loved . . . unconditionally.

The book has much to recommend it for beginning readers. Most of the words are short, repeated, and relate closely to the line drawings. Thus, most children can memorize long sequences and begin to decode words to match their memories. Before long, they can begin to recognize the words.

The Shel Silverstein line drawings have a unique charm to them, often cropping the tree and the boy in unusual ways . . . suggesting motion. My only regret is that there is no color used with the stories. I think that color would have deepened the impact, especially for young children.

After you have finished reading and enjoying the story, I suggest that you ask yourself what should be the limits of giving based on love, if any. Also, what is the responsibility of the recipient of unconditional love? Beyond that, what is each person's responsibility to nature?

Look for the circles within the circles.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Though not religious..., 21. Februar 2000
Von 
tuanomsoc (i didnt find it to be that, exactly) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Giving Tree (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Shel Silverstein and a friend were sitting in a cafe oneafternoon, and Silverstein was asked, "How would you defineJesus?" He went home and wrote this indescribably magnificent work about the ideal behavior of what, to the passerby, would seem to be an ordinary apple tree.
It works on SO many levels; of course, you have the environmentalist argument that the tree is a representative of the earth that man rapes with his plows and his highways. However, you also have the viewpoint of a being whose only desire in life is to please the person she loves...the very definition of the Christ, willing to give everything up for man's well-being.
Contrary to the beliefs of some "readers," it has nothing to do with gender--not many things do, but people heedlessly assign stereotypes and negative connotations to anything that can be construed in a sexual manner. The tree happens to be female in this story. It makes no difference. Her love knows no bounds...no race, no economic situation, no ulterior political motives...she just is. And her simple existence is a testament to the hope and wonder that Silverstein (and many others, hopefully) can find in the minutiae of life.
I don't follow any particular religion per se...but I think that the fact that as long as people like Silverstein and dreams of characters such as the tree still exist, we must be headed in the right direction.
This book is also an initiator of self-analysis...how much do you share with people that desire/want/need something that you can give...and how willing are you to do so? The tree gives without question, without thinking, and is satisfied simply to have the companionship of the boy whenever she can. The tree is the mom that spends her lunch break running children's forgotten homework to the school at the cost of not eating. The tree is the poor older sister who has two hungry younger siblings and one banana to feed the three of them, of which half goes to each brother and she eats the peel. The tree is everything that you can find in people in this world that still fits under the category of "good."
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The tree taught me a true kind heart., 3. Dezember 1997
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Giving Tree (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Book Report

Title of Book: The Giving Tree

This book is a story of heart contact between a tree and a little boy.Once there was a tree, and she loved a little boy who came to her and played with every day. When he was a little boy he gathered her leaves and make them into crowns and play king of the forest, and climb up her, swing from her branches, eat her apples, and so on. He hadn't especially wishes yet. But time went by, he grew up and didn't come to her so much than he was a little boy. However, one day he came to her and said, "I want some money." So tree gave him a lot of apple and she said, "Take these apples. You can sell these, and you can get money." He sold them in the city. After that, he came to her occasionally, and asked her something. Whenever he wished to her, he took something which made him granted. At last the tree became only stump, and when the boy came, she said to him, "I'm sorry I can't give you anything." But the boy became very old, so he didn't need anything but only need relax place. So he sit down on her, and the tree was happy.

I thought this story was very thinkable. The tree always gave a lot of her own body for the boy when he wanted something. And the tree felt happy, but it is really? I think the tree always gave him her kind heart, but he didn't notice that because he was too young to understand. When the boy became very old, he noticed that and the tree became happy truly. This book touched my heart.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The tears still fall after all these years..., 6. November 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Giving Tree (Gebundene Ausgabe)
When a book causes a reader to feel an emotion strong enough to physically affect them, that is pure art. Shel Silverstein has created such a work of art and it is called, "The Giving Tree".
I first read this book when I was just a toddler and was in fact one of the first books I ever read on my own. I cried uncontrollably then, and to this day even the mere mention of this book sends tears running down my face. The book has a powerful affect on me even today as a 25-year-old.
Though the book may seem depressing due to the great sacrifices made by the tree on behalf of the "uncaring" boy, I feel that a deeper meaning lies within this. Just as a mother or father would give everything she or he had to ensure thier child's happiness, so did the tree. For in a sense, the tree was the boy's mother or father. And so, the tree gave up every physical possession it had to try to make the boy happy. And although the boy shows very little affection toward the tree (save for the beginning when he was a young boy and told the tree he loved it), there is a subtle hint of the boy's affection. (The boy continues to come back to the tree depending on it for support.) And when the boy becomes an old man he returns to the tree even then just to sit and enjoy it. That is a form of love-companionship.
Why does the book make me cry even now? Because it makes me reflect upon how much I love my child and how I, like the tree, would give everything to make her happy.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A cautionary tale?, 18. August 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Giving Tree (Gebundene Ausgabe)
I read the same symposium that someone else mentioned hereIt set me to thinking about this book (which I still love) in ways Ihadn't before. If you look at this story as the boy's story and not the tree's, it's possible to see it as a cautionary tale. Remember, the Tree keeps saying, "Take this or that, and then you will be happy." But after chidhood, does the boy ever seem happy? Even after he's attained the wife and family he's looked for, he wants to build a boat to sail away, being "too old and sad to play". (Although, in all fairness, maybe tragedy took his spouse from him.) At the end, he looks dejected and worn. Could Shel have been issuing a warning that anyone who does nothing but take will never be truly content? Perhaps if the boy had learned to give in return, he would have had a more contented life.Although I do see the boy as finally learning his lesson toward the end. When he returns to the stump at the end, he has to know that the tree has nothing left to give. But he is finally ready to give the tree the only thing she ever asked of him...companionship. I kinda see in the old man's face a realization of what he's done and a repentance.There's another metaphor for this as well...the metaphor of parent to child. How many children never see or appreciate the sacrifices their parents have made for them till it is too late, or almost too late? This could have been another warning Shel was issuing. END
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5.0 von 5 Sternen isn't that the point?, 8. Februar 2010
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Giving Tree (Gebundene Ausgabe)
All the negative reviews are that the boy takes the tree's love for granted. The tree goes as far as sacrificing its own life to make the boy happy. This is understood as a free pass for men to take women for granted and humanity to take nature for granted.

Fine, it is true that those who interpret the book as merely an ode to devotion is one-dimensional sentimentalism. But it is only a two-dimensional critique to take the skewed power-dynamic between the boy/man and the tree at face value... The old man is left with a stump to sit on! Wouldn't it have been much better for him to have given something in return and to have truly enjoyed the tree in his youth, in stead of being old and alone? Doesn't it say something that he returned at the end of his life?

I mean, come on, do you take all literature "literally"? If so, then most works should be banned! You have to read between the lines and your children need guidance and interaction when reading this (like all deeper texts)! The negative reviewers are touching on the whole point of the story, but can't quite make the jump to understand that a depiction of "reality" is often a disguised call to alter "reality." Didn't the book succeed in making you think about these greater issues?

Even if the author didn't intend such interpretations, it is up to the parents to use the book (every book) as a tool to better understand the world!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen a personal reply, 23. Juni 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Giving Tree (Gebundene Ausgabe)
I have a personal acquantance with this lovely book. For five long, glorious years, I dated this beautiful woman. We were very much in love, although it seemed that I was the one who tried the hardest to make sure she was happy. After a while, our relationship started to disintigrate, as all things of wonder usually do. I tried harder and harder to make things right, although it was more like a force of nature tearing us apart. I gave and I gave and she took and she took and she tried to give something back but, perhaps, it was well beyond her capacity at that point when things were somehow ruined. As we split, over a dark and miserable Christmas, one of my gifts was this book, with a very personal inscription written inside. It began, "To (---), my giving tree . . ." This showed absolute understanding not only of our lives and our relationship for so long (she was abandoned by her parents at 18 and I, a few years older, took her in and saved her life) and also a beautiful understanding of the message of this book: Love is cruel and there can only be one victor, no matter how much emotion is reciprocated. All things die in nature, be it a person, a plant, a flower or a feeling. Everything ends.
I wish to thank my anonymous ex-girlfriend for this lovely gift. It helped me through many of the darkest hours of seemingly perpetual lonliness.
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