Kundenrezensionen


13 Rezensionen
5 Sterne:
 (7)
4 Sterne:
 (2)
3 Sterne:    (0)
2 Sterne:
 (2)
1 Sterne:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel
Eigene Rezension erstellen
 
 

Die hilfreichste positive Rezension
Die hilfreichste kritische Rezension


7 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Amüsantes Buch über englische Zeichensetzung
Es handelt sich hier natürlich um ein spezielles Thema: Zeichensetzung im Englischen. Das macht es aber auch amüsant und einiges lässt sich auch aufs Deutsche übertragen. Die Autorin setzt sich mit dem richtigen Setzen von Satzzeichen auseinander, informativ und amüsant. Wenn Sie also immer schon mal wissen wollten wo ein Apostroph hingehört,...
Am 2. Februar 2005 veröffentlicht

versus
8 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen "Grammarians" and lovers of American English - back off!
I had given up any hopes of punctuation being used correctly when that movie "Two weeks notice" came out - crying out for an apostrophe. But when all hope was gone, this book came along.
Anyway, that was my first impression.
Now that I have almost finished it - and I'm having a hard time doing so - I'm quite disappointed. The first three chapters were...
Veröffentlicht am 23. Mai 2004 von Manuelita


‹ Zurück | 1 2 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

8 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen "Grammarians" and lovers of American English - back off!, 23. Mai 2004
Von 
Manuelita (Europe, Planet Earth) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
I had given up any hopes of punctuation being used correctly when that movie "Two weeks notice" came out - crying out for an apostrophe. But when all hope was gone, this book came along.
Anyway, that was my first impression.
Now that I have almost finished it - and I'm having a hard time doing so - I'm quite disappointed. The first three chapters were somewhat amusing, but the author repeats herself all the time. Emphasizing again and again that she is no "grammarian" and giving Americans a roasting. I usually like that typical British sense of humour, but this is just too much. Not funny.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


7 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Amüsantes Buch über englische Zeichensetzung, 2. Februar 2005
Von Ein Kunde
Es handelt sich hier natürlich um ein spezielles Thema: Zeichensetzung im Englischen. Das macht es aber auch amüsant und einiges lässt sich auch aufs Deutsche übertragen. Die Autorin setzt sich mit dem richtigen Setzen von Satzzeichen auseinander, informativ und amüsant. Wenn Sie also immer schon mal wissen wollten wo ein Apostroph hingehört, was der Unterschied zwischen einem Komma, einem Semikolon, einem Punkt und einem Doppelpunkt ist, warum es "Bridget Jones's Diary" und nicht "Bridget Jones' Diary" heißt und ob im Filmtitel "Two Weeks Notice" nicht ein Apostroph fehlt, dann liegen Sie mit diesem Buch richtig. Wenn nicht: Lassen Sie die Finger davon!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


10 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Too long, minimally amusing, inadequate as a reference, 16. Juli 2006
I bought this book because it was advertized in The New Yorker and because I loved the title. Well, except for the title and the introduction, I found the book neither useful nor amusing. It is redundant and too long. The author thinks herself very witty and can't get enough of herself telling the same jokes. Why offend readers' intelligence by explaining the humor of the title? I agree with an earlier reviewer that some of the examples may be wrong, such as 'NO DOGS PLEASE'. As far as I know, it is incorrect to use plural after 'no' or 'any'.
The tone of the book is sometimes arrogant: we grammarians against the rest of illiterate world. After making an informal street survey and - perplexingly surprised - hearing people say they care about punctuation, the conclusion that seems most logical to the author is that ... respondents did not tell the truth!
Finally, I had thought that the 'free grammar repair kit' was a quick reference to punctuation (a one-page tear-out thing). But it was a collection of cut-outs of commas, periods, and other puncutation marks. How is one to use it? Doesn't it belong to the children's edition (but then the signs would need to be self-adhesive!).
This book is too long for what it wants to say. I will stick with my old friend "Elements of Style" by Strunk and White, which comes from a more authoritative source (if only for the US conventions), offers better practical advice, funnier humor, and skips the paranoia.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


18 von 21 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Why did the author write this book?, 7. Juni 2004
Von 
Manuelita (Europe, Planet Earth) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Eats, Shoots & Leaves (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Now that I've finished the book I wonder why the author wrote it. Apparently only to let off steam about people (especially Americans) who use commas or apostrophes wrongly. Don't buy this book if you're looking for rules on how to apply punctuation correctly. You won't find them here.
The title and summary sound truly interesting - but that's about it. The same aspects are repeated over and over. Sorry, but I just don't get the point of this book. It's a shame that the interesting topic of punctuation has been abused this way. This is like writing an essay on maths and not being able to count to three ... For a "zero tolerance approach" one should understand the logical rules of punctuation - at least the author should. In my opinion some of the examples given in this book are simply wrong.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen It's a bright, bright moonlight night tonight, 20. März 2010
Von 
Peter Durward Harris "Pete the music fan" (Leicester England) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(TOP 500 REZENSENT)    (REAL NAME)   
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Eats, Shoots and Leaves (Taschenbuch)
The author is a self-confessed stickler for punctuation, yet what this book makes clear is that punctuation itself is only a few hundred years old, which is modest when you think that writing is much older than that. Furthermore, it is continually evolving, just like language itself. I'm certainly not going to claim that my punctuation is perfect, because I know it isn't. Within Amazon reviews, I deliberately don't use quotation marks around titles (although I use them elsewhere), not least because Amazon's software historically behaved strangely when confronted by quotation marks. Maybe those quirks are consigned to history, but I continue writing reviews without quotation marks for the sake of consistency.

Another problem for the author is my use of CD's to indicate more than one CD, where she says the apostrophe is wrong. I adopted the convention because it is widely accepted and looks better - unlike book's, which I'll never use as a plural; I'll only use in its correct context, for example the book's title. I also tend to use more commas than some people may think is necessary, but I'd rather use too many than too few. Reading this book, it is clear that the rules for commas are imprecise, though there are some situations where the presence or absence of a comma makes a lot of difference.

Over and above my obvious disregard for those (and maybe other) rules, I make errors too, though hopefully not too many. Meanwhile, the author may be a stickler for punctuation but did not research the meaning of a Scottish sentence that she used in her book, simply stating that she had no idea what it meant. (The answer is somewhere on this page.)

After a lengthy introduction (a chapter in itself, running to more than thirty pages), the author devotes several chapters to different punctuation marks, illustrating how much difference the various marks make. It is clear that using no punctuation marks would make text difficult to read, but the author emphasizes that you can completely change, or even reverse, the meaning of text depending on how it is punctuated.

The letter from Jill to Jack is particularly funny. The author presents one version where Jill thinks Jack is perfect and an alternative in which she thinks Jack is useless. No words are different, just the punctuation and associated capital letters. For those of you who like to test yourself, I present you with an un-punctuated version (not easy to force through a word processor, so I wrote it in Notepad and pasted it in), from which you can work out how to achieve these contrasting results. In working out your solutions, you may use periods (we Brits call them full stops), capital letters, commas, question marks, apostrophes, exclamation marks, colons and semicolons (but you won't need all of them). Note that it might be possible to arrive at slightly different solutions to those in the book. Here goes

dear jack i want a man who knows what love is all about you are generous kind thoughtful people who are not like you admit to being useless and inferior you have ruined me for other men i yearn for you i have no feelings whatsoever when were apart i can be forever happy will you let me be yours jill

If you can't work out both answers, you definitely need this book. Yes, punctuation is much more important than most of us realize. This book probably isn't the definitive guide, but the author's witty approach to the subject got more people interested in the subject than any other book has ever done.

--------- save somewhere

dear jack i want a man who knows what love is all about you are generous kind thoughtful people who are not like you admit to being useless and inferior you have ruined me for other men i yearn for you i have no feelings whatsoever when were apart i can be forever happy will you let me be yours jill

Perfect

Dear Jack,
I want a man who knows what love is all about.
You are generous, kind, thoughtful.
People who are not like you admit to being useless and inferior.
You have ruined me for other men.
I yearn for you.
I have no feelings whatsoever when we're apart.
I can be forever happy.
Will you let me be yours?
Jill

Useless

Dear Jack,
I want a man who knows what love is.
All about you are generous, kind, thoughtful people who are not like you.
Admit to being useless and inferior.
You have ruined me.
For other men I yearn.
For you, I have no feelings whatsoever
When we're apart, I can be forever happy.
Will you let me be?
Yours,
Jill
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Making grammar fun. Period., 17. Februar 2006
In the tradition of other 'fun with grammar' texts, such as 'Woe is I' by Patricia O'Conner and 'Anguished English' by Richard Lederer, Lynne Truss helps bring to life the simple yet vital piece of communication -- punctuation. Weaving history of use and abuse together in a witty, oh-so-English book, Truss makes light and fun a subject of constant concern, if we would but know it. Victor Borge once had a comedy skit that immediately came to mind when I first started this book, the skit of 'audible' punctuation, in which various pops, whistles and snaps stood for the punctuation that we use in our everyday speech. Just because we don't enunciate it doesn't mean it isn't there!
This point is driven home from the outset -- the very title of this book derives from just such importance in locating punctuation properly. It was once said of a panda bear that it 'eats shoots and leaves' -- however, punctuating it differently, one gets the sense that it eats, then fires some kind of weapon, and then departs, rather than consuming bamboo and green, leafy things.
Truss has a sardonic wit, recommending with British understatement the most horrific sentences for those who abuse their sentences. Truss has little patience (but quite a lot of fun) with common mistakes of the comma, apostrophe, quotation marks, and more. She has somewhat more sympathy for people who haven't learned the fine art of the less prominent punctuation marks: colons, semicolons, brackets and such. However, given the age of such things (some punctuation marks are a thousand years old), perhaps it is about time to start getting things write, er, right.
This is not a long book, and is full of little pieces of wisdom -- to improve one's grammar is to improve one's life, Truss would hold. Certainly, the ability to communicate with language is a primary human quality; the ability to communicate well increases our own sense of self-worth.
It must be accepted that there are different styles of punctuation -- books such as 'Elements of Style' detail these in exacting form (something one will not find in this book. However, on the whole, discovering the differences can be as interesting as any other part of this book, and it will at least show that one is paying proper attention to grammar. While Truss can come across as rather picky, that is precisely the quality one wants in one's editor and teacher of admittedly picayune and pedantic subjects. Try for just one day living life without punctuation!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


3 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Making grammar fun. Period., 17. Februar 2006
In the tradition of other 'fun with grammar' texts, such as 'Woe is I' by Patricia O'Conner and 'Anguished English' by Richard Lederer, Lynne Truss helps bring to life the simple yet vital piece of communication -- punctuation. Weaving history of use and abuse together in a witty, oh-so-English book, Truss makes light and fun a subject of constant concern, if we would but know it. Victor Borge once had a comedy skit that immediately came to mind when I first started this book, the skit of 'audible' punctuation, in which various pops, whistles and snaps stood for the punctuation that we use in our everyday speech. Just because we don't enunciate it doesn't mean it isn't there!
This point is driven home from the outset -- the very title of this book derives from just such importance in locating punctuation properly. It was once said of a panda bear that it 'eats shoots and leaves' -- however, punctuating it differently, one gets the sense that it eats, then fires some kind of weapon, and then departs, rather than consuming bamboo and green, leafy things.
Truss has a sardonic wit, recommending with British understatement the most horrific sentences for those who abuse their sentences. Truss has little patience (but quite a lot of fun) with common mistakes of the comma, apostrophe, quotation marks, and more. She has somewhat more sympathy for people who haven't learned the fine art of the less prominent punctuation marks: colons, semicolons, brackets and such. However, given the age of such things (some punctuation marks are a thousand years old), perhaps it is about time to start getting things write, er, right.
This is not a long book, and is full of little pieces of wisdom -- to improve one's grammar is to improve one's life, Truss would hold. Certainly, the ability to communicate with language is a primary human quality; the ability to communicate well increases our own sense of self-worth.
It must be accepted that there are different styles of punctuation -- books such as 'Elements of Style' detail these in exacting form (something one will not find in this book. However, on the whole, discovering the differences can be as interesting as any other part of this book, and it will at least show that one is paying proper attention to grammar. While Truss can come across as rather picky, that is precisely the quality one wants in one's editor and teacher of admittedly picayune and pedantic subjects. Try for just one day living life without punctuation!
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen interessant und amüsant, 21. April 2013
Von 
Martina Falkenau "fauchkratz" (Frankfurt am Main) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
vielen Dank! Interesse und fast gleich konnt ich es lesen. Danke, dass es das Buch g ebraucht und preiswert gab.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


5.0 von 5 Sternen Sehr vergnügliche Lektüre zu einem trockenen Thema, 27. November 2012
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Nach wie vor aktuell, sachkundig, teilweise ein Bericht aus einer Welt des Sprachbewusstseins, das auszusterben droht. Man wünschte, so mancher "Rezensent" würde auch nur Teile davon besitzen.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


8 von 14 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Witzig wenn man im Thema steckt, sonst hilft es nicht weiter, 28. November 2004
Ich habe das Buch gekauft in dem Glauben, es sei eine gute Anleitung für Komma, Punkt usw. in Englisch. Leider ist dies nicht der Fall.
Zwar werden die Komma-Regel und andere Zeichen (Semikolon, Doppelpunkt usw.) erklärt, aber immer nur ganz kurz. Der Rest vom Buch ist eine Kritik über Schilder und Zeitungen, die die Regeln nicht einhalten.
Die Beispiele sind durchaus witzig, und wenn man der englischen Sprache mächtig ist und die Regeln bereits kennt ist das Buch interessant.
Aber für diejenigen die Englisch als Fremdsprache lernen, ist dieses Buch meiner Meinung nach nicht geeignet um die Regeln zu lernen.
Helfen Sie anderen Kunden bei der Suche nach den hilfreichsten Rezensionen 
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein


‹ Zurück | 1 2 | Weiter ›
Hilfreichste Bewertungen zuerst | Neueste Bewertungen zuerst

Dieses Produkt

Eats, Shoots and Leaves
Eats, Shoots and Leaves von Lynne Truss (Taschenbuch - 1. Oktober 2009)
EUR 10,50
Auf Lager.
In den Einkaufswagen Auf meinen Wunschzettel
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen