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7 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The definitive work for the case of Christianity
Although Lewis was a skeptic for much of his life, he was smart enough to consider the possibility that he might be wrong about his nonbelief in God (for the first half of his life, anyway). Mere Christianity is a compilation of the reasons why he converted. It should be pointed out that this book will not prove Christianity to be true. Trusting in Christ is still a...
Veröffentlicht am 28. Juli 2000 von E. Johnson

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2.0 von 5 Sternen The best work from the most overrated Christian thinker ever
I reviewed this book earlier, and I must tell you that 16 months of maturity do a lot to alter a view. Mere Christianity is a book for the average believer who is just beginning his/her inquiry into why he or she adheres to Christianity, but it is by no means a sophisticated, well-developed argument in favor of Christianity. For example, the first part of the book...
Veröffentlicht am 24. Juni 2000 von Thayne Currie


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5.0 von 5 Sternen The definitive work for the case of Christianity, 28. Juli 2000
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E. Johnson (Sandy, UT) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: Mere Christianity (Taschenbuch)
Although Lewis was a skeptic for much of his life, he was smart enough to consider the possibility that he might be wrong about his nonbelief in God (for the first half of his life, anyway). Mere Christianity is a compilation of the reasons why he converted. It should be pointed out that this book will not prove Christianity to be true. Trusting in Christ is still a faith issue. However, the evidence presented by Lewis is strong enough to get even the most ardent skeptic to think through the philosophical arguments used to bolster the case Christianity.
This book is good for a number of reasons. I appreciate Lewis' candor and frankness as he supports the truth of Christianity. It has been instrumental in the conversions of many people, even those who are very prominent in the Christian scene today. (I think it is wonderful how much more popular Lewis is today than when he was alive!) Indeed, his writing has touched a great number of people, including me. In fact, I've read all of his nonfictional works, and I find it fascinating to track with Lewis' reasoning and argumentation. As you can see, this book has my highest recommendation.
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2.0 von 5 Sternen The best work from the most overrated Christian thinker ever, 24. Juni 2000
Von 
Thayne Currie (Cambridge, MA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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I reviewed this book earlier, and I must tell you that 16 months of maturity do a lot to alter a view. Mere Christianity is a book for the average believer who is just beginning his/her inquiry into why he or she adheres to Christianity, but it is by no means a sophisticated, well-developed argument in favor of Christianity. For example, the first part of the book deals with, among other things, an argument for God's existence from morality. Lewis claims that there is a moral law within each one of us that we feel bound to. This is not a moral law that we just "decide" to have, says Lewis, but rather it eminates from a source outside of our conscious self. Since we are not the source of this law and this doesn't come as some natural byproduct of evolution, therefore there must be a Lawgiver. Somehow, Lewis thinks that this amounts to a convincing argument for the existence of God. But any moral philosopher of significant caliber can pick apart this argument. Sure, someone could believe that there is a moral law and that God is the lawgiver, but from reading Mere Christianity, we can go no further than this. Not only does this not amount to a rock-solid argument for the existence of God but it isn't even a decent argument. Reading the passage over and over again, I kept looking for the A=B, B=C, therefore A=C syllogism that one usually expects with an argument using formal logic. Its almost as if Lewis speculates for a while about a divine moral law and proceeds on with his book as if he's proved that such a thing exists (and such a Lawgiver for the thing). If a theist wants a philosphically compelling argument for an objective morality, they must investigate the Thomist tradition of philosophy. If a theist wants to show that only this view of morality works, his/her best outlet is Alasdair MacIntyre's "After Virtue" which skewers the entire Enlightenment Project of justifying morality on "reason" alone from Kant to Kierkegard. He then shows how Nietzsche exposes the project for what it is, and why we must return to a Neo-Aristotelian version of a system of morality (and eventually a Thomistic account of morality) since this is the only real option we have unless we want chaos (e.g. Nietzsche).
Another annoying tendency with this book is Lewis' overreliance on arguments from analogy. For instance, in his exhortation on the Trinity, he compares the relations between the different persons of the Trinity to three books stacked on top of a table. One depends on the other, and that one on the bottom one. But one of the dangers with arguing from analogy is making sure that the analogy is a good one. Oddly enough, the best argument for the Trinity I've ever come across is from Conversations with God: not exactly an explicitly Christian book (although extremely interesting).
Overall, Lewis does ok for the general lay audience, but for someone thirsting for a compelling defense and offensive argument in favor of traditional theism and/or Christianity, one must look elsewhere.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Merely wonderful, 23. Februar 2006
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Mere Christianity (Taschenbuch)
C.S. Lewis was a rare individual. One of the few non-clerics to be recognised as a theologian by the Anglican church, he put forth the case for Christianity in general in ways that many Christians beyond the Anglican world can accept, and a clear description for non-Christians of what Christian faith and practice should be. Indeed, Lewis says in his introduction that this text (or indeed, hardly any other he produced) will help in deciding between Christian denominations. While he describes himself as a 'very ordinary layman' in the Church of England, he looks to the broader picture of Christianity, particularly for those who have little or no background. The discussion of division points rarely wins a convert, Lewis observed, and so he leaves the issues of ecclesiology and high theology differences to 'experts'. Lewis is of course selling himself short in this regard, but it helps to reinforce his point.
The book looks at beliefs, both from a 'natural' standpoint as well as a scripture/tradition/reason standpoint. Lewis looks both at belief and unbelief - for example, he states that Christians do not have to see other religions of the world as thoroughly wrong; on the other hand, to be an atheist requires (in Lewis' estimation) that one view religions, all religions, as founded on a mistake. Lewis probably surprised his listeners by starting a statement, 'When I was an atheist...' Lewis is a late-comer to Christianity (most Anglicans in England were cradle-Anglicans). Thus Lewis can speak with the authority of one having deliberately chosen and found Christianity, rather than one who by accident of birth never knew any other (although the case can be made that Lewis was certainly raised in a culture dominated by Christendom).
Lewis also looks at practice - here we are not talking about liturgical niceties or even general church-y practices, but rather the broad strokes of Christian practice - issues of morality, forgiveness, charity, hope and faith. Faith actually has two chapters - one in the more common use of system of belief, but the other in a more subtle, spiritual way. Lewis states in the second chapter that should readers get lost, they should just skip the chapter - while many parts of Christianity will be accessible and intelligible to non-Christians, some things cannot be understood from the outside. This is the 'leave it to God' sense of faith, that is in many ways more of a gift or grace from God than a skill to be developed.
Finally, Lewis looks at personality, not just in the sense of our individual personality, but our status as persons and of God's own personality. Lewis' conclusion that there is no true personality apart from God's is somewhat disquieting; Lewis contrasts Christianity with itself in saying that it is both easy and hard at the same time. Lewis looks for the 'new man' to be a creature in complete submission and abandonment to God. This is a turn both easy and difficult.
'Mere Christianity' was originally a series of radio talks, published as three separate books - 'The Case for Christianity', 'Christian Behaviour', and 'Beyond Personality'. This book brings together all three texts. Lewis' style is witty and engaging, the kind of writing that indeed lives to be read aloud. Lewis debates whether or not it was a good idea to leave the oral-language aspects in the written text (given that the tools for emphasis in written language are different); I think the correct choice was made.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Merely wonderful, 3. Januar 2006
C.S. Lewis was a rare individual. One of the few non-clerics to be recognised as a theologian by the Anglican church, he put forth the case for Christianity in general in ways that many Christians beyond the Anglican world can accept, and a clear description for non-Christians of what Christian faith and practice should be. Indeed, Lewis says in his introduction that this text (or indeed, hardly any other he produced) will help in deciding between Christian denominations. While he describes himself as a 'very ordinary layman' in the Church of England, he looks to the broader picture of Christianity, particularly for those who have little or no background. The discussion of division points rarely wins a convert, Lewis observed, and so he leaves the issues of ecclesiology and high theology differences to 'experts'. Lewis is of course selling himself short in this regard, but it helps to reinforce his point.
The book looks at beliefs, both from a 'natural' standpoint as well as a scripture/tradition/reason standpoint. Lewis looks both at belief and unbelief - for example, he states that Christians do not have to see other religions of the world as thoroughly wrong; on the other hand, to be an atheist requires (in Lewis' estimation) that one view religions, all religions, as founded on a mistake. Lewis probably surprised his listeners by starting a statement, 'When I was an atheist...' Lewis is a late-comer to Christianity (most Anglicans in England were cradle-Anglicans). Thus Lewis can speak with the authority of one having deliberately chosen and found Christianity, rather than one who by accident of birth never knew any other (although the case can be made that Lewis was certainly raised in a culture dominated by Christendom).
Lewis also looks at practice - here we are not talking about liturgical niceties or even general church-y practices, but rather the broad strokes of Christian practice - issues of morality, forgiveness, charity, hope and faith. Faith actually has two chapters - one in the more common use of system of belief, but the other in a more subtle, spiritual way. Lewis states in the second chapter that should readers get lost, they should just skip the chapter - while many parts of Christianity will be accessible and intelligible to non-Christians, some things cannot be understood from the outside. This is the `leave it to God' sense of faith, that is in many ways more of a gift or grace from God than a skill to be developed.
Finally, Lewis looks at personality, not just in the sense of our individual personality, but our status as persons and of God's own personality. Lewis' conclusion that there is no true personality apart from God's is somewhat disquieting; Lewis contrasts Christianity with itself in saying that it is both easy and hard at the same time. Lewis looks for the `new man' to be a creature in complete submission and abandonment to God. This is a turn both easy and difficult.
'Mere Christianity' was originally a series of radio talks, published as three separate books - 'The Case for Christianity', 'Christian Behaviour', and 'Beyond Personality'. This book brings together all three texts. Lewis' style is witty and engaging, the kind of writing that indeed lives to be read aloud. Lewis debates whether or not it was a good idea to leave the oral-language aspects in the written text (given that the tools for emphasis in written language are different); I think the correct choice was made.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Deceptively strong defense for the Christian faith, 24. Januar 1999
Von 
Thayne Currie (Cambridge, MA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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Mere Christianity is a wonderful book for the Christian looking to justify his/her faith and the non-Christian who wants to explore the rationale behind many Christian beliefs. While Christians throughout the ages have left paradoxical doctrines like God's incarnation as Jesus and the Trinity up to faith, Lewis takes these ideas head on, and he does a surprisingly good job at explaining these complex ideas. Lewis also is very easy to read and appealing to the average person, using little theological jargon in his defenses. His arguments are deceptively strong: unlike Aquinas, Lewis does not attack "out in the open", making strong claims and then defending them. It takes a while for Lewis to develop his ideas, and I guess this makes them harder to refute. Mere Christianity is by no means perfect (it does have a few, scattered, minor flaws in it) but it comes as close to perfect as any apologetic book that I've ever read.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Powerful. Liberating. Logical. Irrefutable that God exists, 8. Dezember 1998
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Mere Christianity (Hörkassette)
This book helped God reveal to me the truth that I had so long struggled to discover myself. I was raised in the church, but I could never fully understand the nature and meaning of Christ. My logical and intellectual nature as an engineer kept me from grasping the truth about God, but after reading this book, I feel I have been saved. The intellectual struggle is over, and I now live to do God's will. In this book, C.S. Lewis begins logically introducing this feeling of morality all humans feel. He then explains the source of this morality which everyone should take notice of. He also holds up what he believes to be the core of Christian belief that all Christian denominations must agree on. If you struggle with what seems to be illogical about God, read this book. You'll come to see that God is more logical then you have ever considered befored.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A thought provoking guide for those seeking understanding, 19. Dezember 1996
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Mere Christianity (Taschenbuch)
Who is God? How do I come to know Him? Are we God's descendants?

These questions are but a few of the questions that C.S. Lewis addresses in "Mere Christianity". This book contains short chapters that can be read in under 10 minutes. However, Lewis has managed to zero in on the question and explore it in such detail that no one can walk away without fully understanding the issues and his position on them.

Lewis relies not on quoting scripture to illustrate the core principles of his beliefs, but rather on logic and the observation of humanity.

"Mere Christianity" is highly recommended for both the Christian searching to answer questions about his faith and the non-Christian who is wondering what all the fuss is about.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Superb, 28. Juni 1998
Von 
David Graham (Shell, Ecuador) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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Mere Christianity is a revised and enlarged edition of the three books produced from C.S. Lewis's radio broadcasts in England during World War II: The Case for Christianity, Christian Behaviour, and Beyond Personality. Here is the outline for Mere Christianity:
Book I. RIGHT AND WRONG AS A CLUE TO THE MEANING OF THE UNIVERSE. 1.) The Law of Human Nature (Where Lewis begins by saying, "Every one has heard people quarrelling," then goes on to talk about the moral law people appeal to when they argue.) 2.) Some Objections 3.)The Reality of the Law 4.) What Lies Behind the Law 5.) We Have Cause to Be Uneasy
Book II. WHAT CHRISTIANS BELIEVE 1.) The Rival Conceptions of God 2.) The Invasion 3.) The Shocking Alternative (where Lewis presents his claims that Jesus of Nazareth was either God incarnate, a liar, or a lunatic, but not merely a good moral teacher.) 4.) The Perfect Penitent 5.) The Practical Conclusion
Book III. CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR 1.) The Three Parts of Morality 2.) The "Cardinal Virtues" (Lewis discusses Prudence, Temperance, Justice, and Fortitude) 3.) Social Morality 4.) Morality and Psychoanalysis 5.) Sexual Morality 6.) Christian Marriage 7.) Forgiveness 8.) The Great Sin (pride) 9.) Charity 10.) Hope 11.) Faith 12.) Faith
Book IV. BEYOND PERSONALITY: OR FIRST STEPS IN THE DOCTRINE OF THE TRINITY 1.) Making and Begetting 2.) The Three-Personal God 3.) Time and Beyond Time 4.) Good Infection 5a.) The Obstinate Toy Soldiers 6.) Two Notes 7.) Let's Pretend 8.) Is Christianity Hard or Easy? 9.) Counting the Cost 10.) Nice People or New Men 11.) The New Men
In his preface, Lewis wrote, "The reader should be warned that I offer no help to anyone who is hesitating between two Christian "denominations." You will not learn from me whether you ought to become an Anglican, a Methodist, a Presbyterian, or a Roman Catholic. . . Ever since I became a Christian I have thought that the best, perhaps! the only, service I could do for my unbelieving neighbours was to explain and defend the belief that has been common to nearly all Christians at all times." This was Lewis's purpose in creating this book, to discuss what Baxter called "mere" Christianity, or the bare essentials that should be common to all Christians. In a book that is less than 200 pages long, it is amazing that Lewis was able to accomplish such a task. Regardless of whether you are already a Christian, or someone who is interested only in what it is that Christians believe, this concise book explains the basics in an engaging fashion.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Lucid and Thoughtful, 30. Juli 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Mere Christianity (Taschenbuch)
It works in three parts, putting forward an argument for the existence of God, then for Christianity, then for Christian doctrine. It deals with some complicated questions with ease and asks some in response. Even if you dislike the book from heresay or disagree with Christianity full stop, it is worth reading and weighing up
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Warm-hearted yet intellectual, 24. Januar 2012
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Mere Christianity (Taschenbuch)
One thing first: this is not a book written for intellectuals to discuss; Mere Christianity is much rather a personal and familiar approach; Lewis draws the reader into some kind of conversation, which is typical for him.

Nevertheless, it may be an inspiration to those who have remained on their childhood's level of religious thought and imagination, as well as to anyone who would like to find some good arguments for Faith. I have seen someone muse about how a first-year student of philosophy could outdo most of them. I would like to see this student in a conversation with Lewis. He would probably be defeated in about two minutes, as most of the topic is merely sketched for everyone's understanding. If you really enter the reasoning given, you might find it pretty difficult to get over it, especially the parts about ourselves being the only thing in the universe that we really know about.

The second part of the book deals with what Christians, in general, believe. Most of it could be accepted by believers in general, but some parts are outdated, thus do not belong into "mere" Christianity. Sexual moral is quite reasonably explained, but leaves out some important facts about human fallibility and juvenile experiences... to be quite clear, the New Testament speaks about marriage, but very little about sex. And never let it trouble you when Lewis talks about "the perverted desire of a man for a man" as a self-evident example of sinfulness, but which Christ forgives because he knows about your dispositions. There is enough clear evidence in some parts of the Gosple and the Acts that you do not have to consider it thus.
However, even these parts may be of quite some inspiration for anyone to think about their own, and only their own, sexual moral - or any of the other parts of Christian belief that Lewis outlines. Conclusions remain individual, and quite possibly nobody will share the views about "to kill" and "to murder", but none of the arguments given should be completely forgotten by anyone who would like to learn more about general Christian views.

As a third part and as a conclusion... I hold that to read and understand this book is part of general knowledge to anyone who would like to discuss the topic in our days, be it the Pope or Richard Dawkins.
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