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7 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The definitive work for the case of Christianity
Although Lewis was a skeptic for much of his life, he was smart enough to consider the possibility that he might be wrong about his nonbelief in God (for the first half of his life, anyway). Mere Christianity is a compilation of the reasons why he converted. It should be pointed out that this book will not prove Christianity to be true. Trusting in Christ is still a...
Veröffentlicht am 28. Juli 2000 von E. Johnson

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2.0 von 5 Sternen The best work from the most overrated Christian thinker ever
I reviewed this book earlier, and I must tell you that 16 months of maturity do a lot to alter a view. Mere Christianity is a book for the average believer who is just beginning his/her inquiry into why he or she adheres to Christianity, but it is by no means a sophisticated, well-developed argument in favor of Christianity. For example, the first part of the book...
Veröffentlicht am 24. Juni 2000 von Thayne Currie


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5.0 von 5 Sternen The definitive work for the case of Christianity, 28. Juli 2000
Von 
E. Johnson (Sandy, UT) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
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Rezension bezieht sich auf: Mere Christianity (Taschenbuch)
Although Lewis was a skeptic for much of his life, he was smart enough to consider the possibility that he might be wrong about his nonbelief in God (for the first half of his life, anyway). Mere Christianity is a compilation of the reasons why he converted. It should be pointed out that this book will not prove Christianity to be true. Trusting in Christ is still a faith issue. However, the evidence presented by Lewis is strong enough to get even the most ardent skeptic to think through the philosophical arguments used to bolster the case Christianity.
This book is good for a number of reasons. I appreciate Lewis' candor and frankness as he supports the truth of Christianity. It has been instrumental in the conversions of many people, even those who are very prominent in the Christian scene today. (I think it is wonderful how much more popular Lewis is today than when he was alive!) Indeed, his writing has touched a great number of people, including me. In fact, I've read all of his nonfictional works, and I find it fascinating to track with Lewis' reasoning and argumentation. As you can see, this book has my highest recommendation.
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2.0 von 5 Sternen The best work from the most overrated Christian thinker ever, 24. Juni 2000
Von 
Thayne Currie (Cambridge, MA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
I reviewed this book earlier, and I must tell you that 16 months of maturity do a lot to alter a view. Mere Christianity is a book for the average believer who is just beginning his/her inquiry into why he or she adheres to Christianity, but it is by no means a sophisticated, well-developed argument in favor of Christianity. For example, the first part of the book deals with, among other things, an argument for God's existence from morality. Lewis claims that there is a moral law within each one of us that we feel bound to. This is not a moral law that we just "decide" to have, says Lewis, but rather it eminates from a source outside of our conscious self. Since we are not the source of this law and this doesn't come as some natural byproduct of evolution, therefore there must be a Lawgiver. Somehow, Lewis thinks that this amounts to a convincing argument for the existence of God. But any moral philosopher of significant caliber can pick apart this argument. Sure, someone could believe that there is a moral law and that God is the lawgiver, but from reading Mere Christianity, we can go no further than this. Not only does this not amount to a rock-solid argument for the existence of God but it isn't even a decent argument. Reading the passage over and over again, I kept looking for the A=B, B=C, therefore A=C syllogism that one usually expects with an argument using formal logic. Its almost as if Lewis speculates for a while about a divine moral law and proceeds on with his book as if he's proved that such a thing exists (and such a Lawgiver for the thing). If a theist wants a philosphically compelling argument for an objective morality, they must investigate the Thomist tradition of philosophy. If a theist wants to show that only this view of morality works, his/her best outlet is Alasdair MacIntyre's "After Virtue" which skewers the entire Enlightenment Project of justifying morality on "reason" alone from Kant to Kierkegard. He then shows how Nietzsche exposes the project for what it is, and why we must return to a Neo-Aristotelian version of a system of morality (and eventually a Thomistic account of morality) since this is the only real option we have unless we want chaos (e.g. Nietzsche).
Another annoying tendency with this book is Lewis' overreliance on arguments from analogy. For instance, in his exhortation on the Trinity, he compares the relations between the different persons of the Trinity to three books stacked on top of a table. One depends on the other, and that one on the bottom one. But one of the dangers with arguing from analogy is making sure that the analogy is a good one. Oddly enough, the best argument for the Trinity I've ever come across is from Conversations with God: not exactly an explicitly Christian book (although extremely interesting).
Overall, Lewis does ok for the general lay audience, but for someone thirsting for a compelling defense and offensive argument in favor of traditional theism and/or Christianity, one must look elsewhere.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Merely wonderful, 23. Februar 2006
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Mere Christianity (Taschenbuch)
C.S. Lewis was a rare individual. One of the few non-clerics to be recognised as a theologian by the Anglican church, he put forth the case for Christianity in general in ways that many Christians beyond the Anglican world can accept, and a clear description for non-Christians of what Christian faith and practice should be. Indeed, Lewis says in his introduction that this text (or indeed, hardly any other he produced) will help in deciding between Christian denominations. While he describes himself as a 'very ordinary layman' in the Church of England, he looks to the broader picture of Christianity, particularly for those who have little or no background. The discussion of division points rarely wins a convert, Lewis observed, and so he leaves the issues of ecclesiology and high theology differences to 'experts'. Lewis is of course selling himself short in this regard, but it helps to reinforce his point.
The book looks at beliefs, both from a 'natural' standpoint as well as a scripture/tradition/reason standpoint. Lewis looks both at belief and unbelief - for example, he states that Christians do not have to see other religions of the world as thoroughly wrong; on the other hand, to be an atheist requires (in Lewis' estimation) that one view religions, all religions, as founded on a mistake. Lewis probably surprised his listeners by starting a statement, 'When I was an atheist...' Lewis is a late-comer to Christianity (most Anglicans in England were cradle-Anglicans). Thus Lewis can speak with the authority of one having deliberately chosen and found Christianity, rather than one who by accident of birth never knew any other (although the case can be made that Lewis was certainly raised in a culture dominated by Christendom).
Lewis also looks at practice - here we are not talking about liturgical niceties or even general church-y practices, but rather the broad strokes of Christian practice - issues of morality, forgiveness, charity, hope and faith. Faith actually has two chapters - one in the more common use of system of belief, but the other in a more subtle, spiritual way. Lewis states in the second chapter that should readers get lost, they should just skip the chapter - while many parts of Christianity will be accessible and intelligible to non-Christians, some things cannot be understood from the outside. This is the 'leave it to God' sense of faith, that is in many ways more of a gift or grace from God than a skill to be developed.
Finally, Lewis looks at personality, not just in the sense of our individual personality, but our status as persons and of God's own personality. Lewis' conclusion that there is no true personality apart from God's is somewhat disquieting; Lewis contrasts Christianity with itself in saying that it is both easy and hard at the same time. Lewis looks for the 'new man' to be a creature in complete submission and abandonment to God. This is a turn both easy and difficult.
'Mere Christianity' was originally a series of radio talks, published as three separate books - 'The Case for Christianity', 'Christian Behaviour', and 'Beyond Personality'. This book brings together all three texts. Lewis' style is witty and engaging, the kind of writing that indeed lives to be read aloud. Lewis debates whether or not it was a good idea to leave the oral-language aspects in the written text (given that the tools for emphasis in written language are different); I think the correct choice was made.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Merely wonderful, 3. Januar 2006
C.S. Lewis was a rare individual. One of the few non-clerics to be recognised as a theologian by the Anglican church, he put forth the case for Christianity in general in ways that many Christians beyond the Anglican world can accept, and a clear description for non-Christians of what Christian faith and practice should be. Indeed, Lewis says in his introduction that this text (or indeed, hardly any other he produced) will help in deciding between Christian denominations. While he describes himself as a 'very ordinary layman' in the Church of England, he looks to the broader picture of Christianity, particularly for those who have little or no background. The discussion of division points rarely wins a convert, Lewis observed, and so he leaves the issues of ecclesiology and high theology differences to 'experts'. Lewis is of course selling himself short in this regard, but it helps to reinforce his point.
The book looks at beliefs, both from a 'natural' standpoint as well as a scripture/tradition/reason standpoint. Lewis looks both at belief and unbelief - for example, he states that Christians do not have to see other religions of the world as thoroughly wrong; on the other hand, to be an atheist requires (in Lewis' estimation) that one view religions, all religions, as founded on a mistake. Lewis probably surprised his listeners by starting a statement, 'When I was an atheist...' Lewis is a late-comer to Christianity (most Anglicans in England were cradle-Anglicans). Thus Lewis can speak with the authority of one having deliberately chosen and found Christianity, rather than one who by accident of birth never knew any other (although the case can be made that Lewis was certainly raised in a culture dominated by Christendom).
Lewis also looks at practice - here we are not talking about liturgical niceties or even general church-y practices, but rather the broad strokes of Christian practice - issues of morality, forgiveness, charity, hope and faith. Faith actually has two chapters - one in the more common use of system of belief, but the other in a more subtle, spiritual way. Lewis states in the second chapter that should readers get lost, they should just skip the chapter - while many parts of Christianity will be accessible and intelligible to non-Christians, some things cannot be understood from the outside. This is the `leave it to God' sense of faith, that is in many ways more of a gift or grace from God than a skill to be developed.
Finally, Lewis looks at personality, not just in the sense of our individual personality, but our status as persons and of God's own personality. Lewis' conclusion that there is no true personality apart from God's is somewhat disquieting; Lewis contrasts Christianity with itself in saying that it is both easy and hard at the same time. Lewis looks for the `new man' to be a creature in complete submission and abandonment to God. This is a turn both easy and difficult.
'Mere Christianity' was originally a series of radio talks, published as three separate books - 'The Case for Christianity', 'Christian Behaviour', and 'Beyond Personality'. This book brings together all three texts. Lewis' style is witty and engaging, the kind of writing that indeed lives to be read aloud. Lewis debates whether or not it was a good idea to leave the oral-language aspects in the written text (given that the tools for emphasis in written language are different); I think the correct choice was made.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Excellent work, minor complaints, 29. April 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Mere Christianity (Taschenbuch)
I liked the introduction to this book. I know it seems like something trivial to comment on, but so many introductions lack the same feel of the book they introduce, which is strange. So many lengthy introductions seem like they were sucked dry of all life until reading it feels like you're chewing on metal plates.
Anyway.
I enjoy the spirit Lewis writes in. He offers a clear foundation for legitimate musing on the Truth of Christianity, something noticeably absent from most contemporary literature and thinking (I'm not advocating an unbalanced pursuit of Truth in words, it's easy to master apologetics and rely on the refutable testimony of a golden tongue and not on the irrefutable testimony of a holy, obedient life. Knowledge doesn't exist for its own sake, it carries with it the duty to act on it. If apologetics don't help you understand your faith in a way that bears fruit in what you do as well as what you say, it is merely sweet poison. Remember, Christianity is a philosophy of deeds, not of words.).
I like the way that Lewis evokes the majesty, seriousness and immediacy of his subject.
My largest complaint was the way he approached the commandment "You shall not murder". He would justify the taking of someone's life if it's done in self defense, calling that 'killing', but in my opinion, you 'kill' an animal, you 'murder' people.
I'm surprised he took the stand he did on that considering the familiarity he seems to have with church history (I could be wrong about that, if I am, I've no doubt someone will correct me). The writers of the pre-nicene church all uniformly taught nonresistance, and it seems unlikely that they would have falled uniformly into heresy and then faithfully preserve that heresy, especially when they had the opportunity to consult with either the apostles or men who were taught the faith and ordained as leaders by one or more of the apostles. These are the men who essentially assembled our new testament canon and preserved it. So it seems doubtful that a uniformly held belief of theirs would be wrong.
That's my only significant qualm. Aside from that, I think the book is good. I'd recommend it to anyone.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The most solid apologetic overview that I've ever read., 28. September 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Having read Mere Christianity several times and then having read the BAD reviews on it I found the "one star crowd" to be a particularly bitter bunch, ignoring the weightier concepts and ignoring the whole scope of the book. Mr Lewis's life and work was a singular effort in defense of the faith (after his conversion) and anyone who sees a 200 odd page compilation of many of these insights as superficial is correct in only the most superficial way. It would take a book that was a decade in the making and more than an armful to exhaustively compile all the arguments and counter-arguments for and against the christian faith and Lewis gives a lively and accurate synopsis of the whole of apologetics. This is very readable stuff in a progressive manner that basically takes you from the starting point of believing that we exist, through the existance of moral law, a moral law-giver, a self revealing moral lawgiver, and finally arriving at a wise immortal man on a cross. The final sections of the book basically saw what we can think and know about reality basd on this situation and how we should then live. A wonderful book that a christian's heart will take as spiritual steak and potatoes and unbelivers will reel at as they begin to see the reasonableness of the God.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen EXCELLENT!, 29. Juni 2004
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Mere Christianity (Hörkassette)
This review is based on the 4-Tape audio book.
The book itself is already a MUST READ for anyone interested in philosophy, religion or christianity. Even if you don't agree with his conclusions, C.S.Lewis is brilliant.
If you have already read the book (like myself twice) you will most definetly still enjoy the tapes! I picked them up to have something to listen to while travelling or on long drives. But I was surprised at how much had escaped me from the book (like the preface, which I admit to having mostly skipped)!
Perhaps it's because the text was originally written for radio broadcast, but it does make a HUGE difference in listening to it rather than reading.
The pace of reading is just right, and the reader is easy to understand, even for a non-british listener. Four tapes may seem like a lot, but they just fly by.
The tapes are well worth the price. Don't miss out on this one, you will not regret it!!!
(BTW, it also makes an excellent gift...)
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Deceptively strong defense for the Christian faith, 24. Januar 1999
Von 
Thayne Currie (Cambridge, MA) - Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
(REAL NAME)   
Mere Christianity is a wonderful book for the Christian looking to justify his/her faith and the non-Christian who wants to explore the rationale behind many Christian beliefs. While Christians throughout the ages have left paradoxical doctrines like God's incarnation as Jesus and the Trinity up to faith, Lewis takes these ideas head on, and he does a surprisingly good job at explaining these complex ideas. Lewis also is very easy to read and appealing to the average person, using little theological jargon in his defenses. His arguments are deceptively strong: unlike Aquinas, Lewis does not attack "out in the open", making strong claims and then defending them. It takes a while for Lewis to develop his ideas, and I guess this makes them harder to refute. Mere Christianity is by no means perfect (it does have a few, scattered, minor flaws in it) but it comes as close to perfect as any apologetic book that I've ever read.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Powerful. Liberating. Logical. Irrefutable that God exists, 8. Dezember 1998
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Mere Christianity (Hörkassette)
This book helped God reveal to me the truth that I had so long struggled to discover myself. I was raised in the church, but I could never fully understand the nature and meaning of Christ. My logical and intellectual nature as an engineer kept me from grasping the truth about God, but after reading this book, I feel I have been saved. The intellectual struggle is over, and I now live to do God's will. In this book, C.S. Lewis begins logically introducing this feeling of morality all humans feel. He then explains the source of this morality which everyone should take notice of. He also holds up what he believes to be the core of Christian belief that all Christian denominations must agree on. If you struggle with what seems to be illogical about God, read this book. You'll come to see that God is more logical then you have ever considered befored.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A thought provoking guide for those seeking understanding, 19. Dezember 1996
Von Ein Kunde
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Mere Christianity (Taschenbuch)
Who is God? How do I come to know Him? Are we God's descendants?

These questions are but a few of the questions that C.S. Lewis addresses in "Mere Christianity". This book contains short chapters that can be read in under 10 minutes. However, Lewis has managed to zero in on the question and explore it in such detail that no one can walk away without fully understanding the issues and his position on them.

Lewis relies not on quoting scripture to illustrate the core principles of his beliefs, but rather on logic and the observation of humanity.

"Mere Christianity" is highly recommended for both the Christian searching to answer questions about his faith and the non-Christian who is wondering what all the fuss is about.
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