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The orchard keeper (Neglected books of the twentieth century) (Englisch) Taschenbuch


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch
  • Verlag: Ecco Press
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0880010096
  • ISBN-13: 978-0880010092
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 19,8 x 13,2 x 2 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.2 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 4.492.787 in Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Bücher)

Mehr über den Autor

Cormac McCarthy wurde 1933 in Rhodes Island geboren und wuchs in Knoxville/Tennessee, auf. Für seine Bücher wurde er u. a. mit dem William Faulkner Award, dem American Academy Award, dem National Book Award und dem National Book Crities Circle Award ausgezeichnet. 2007 erhielt er für seinen epochalen Roman Die Straße den Pulitzerpreis. McCarthy lebt heute in El Paso, Texas. "Kein Land für alte Männer" wurde von den Coen-Brüdern fürs Kino verfilmt.

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4.2 von 5 Sternen
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von R. Mathes am 14. März 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
I am a big William Faulkner fan and after reading the great four (Absalom.., As I Lay Dying, Light In August, and The Sound...) tried All the Pretty Horses a few years ago. Everyone said it was great so like a good prisoner of the "you must read this syndrone", I started it. I found it incredibly beautiful in terms of prose style and language but after 100 or so pages I did not really care about the characters. I thought it was my fault and not McCarthy's so I left it and decided that I would reapproach it later on. It is now three years later and I figured I would read his first book before I started the now completed Border trilogy.
This is a tremendously artful and in many ways wonderful book. Nobody since Faulkner has as dense and intense a prose style. You must have an unabridged dictionary beside you to really get everything he gives you. The reason I write this review is for those who want a deep, meaningful book and are thinking of reading this like I was. If you are such a person and do not have alot of time on your hands, I would suggest going elsewhere for one reason only. Another Amazon reader talked about the plot of this novel as being extraordinarily inconsequential. I think that this is McCarthy's point. It is a story about the land and people that personify independance. It is about an age of rural Southern life that no longer exists. It is not supposed to tie it's points up in ribbons and to keep you passionately turning pages unless your there for the art of it (of which there is a considerable amount).
My frustration was that when I finished this, I got it and appreciated it but was not particularly moved in any way. I read the last three chapters again to see if I was an idiot or if this was just an erudite, muted text.
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Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Von Ein Kunde am 28. April 1997
Format: Taschenbuch
In 1930s rural Tennessee, men from three generations play out their lives in ignorance of a secret that binds them together. John Wesley Rattner is a young boy aiming to make a living from trapping muskrats. Marion Sylder is the bootlegger who, years before, killed Rattner's itinerant father. Ather Ownby is the old man who alone knows where the body of Kenneth Rattner lies rotting to nothing.

McCarthy tells their story of 'profound inconsequence' in language of exotic precision. They are bound together through their relationship with nature and the land which offers up little sustenance but imbues their lives of dispossessed independence with meaning. In his prose, McCarthy elevates the everyday to a poetic significance, with some of the richest descriptions of the unforgiving natural world to be found anywhere. A bird on the wing, a wind in the trees, a car on a mountain road: he handles each image with equal skill, so that we exist with them in that place and time.

McCarthy treads the fine line between pathos and bathos, walking with sure steps, so that we feel for his subject - men hunting, the animals they hunt, the landscape as part of which they exist - but we never feel sorry. His dialogue is sparse, but loaded, with a natural rhythm you may have thought lost to the world. McCarthy finds the beauty in desperation and depicts it unsentimentally. While his story is a guiltless one of violence and resignation in the face of material poverty, his subject is 'all questions ever pressed upon humanity and beyond understanding'. Except McCarthy appears to understand them, and is able to explicate them.
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Von Alfred B. Shapiro am 20. April 1998
Format: Taschenbuch
Any reader of McCarthy's work knows that he views the human condition as one of substantial adversity, but not without redeeming value. His earlier work, set in Tennessee (including this) seem to have a more affecting quality. Something seems more "true", closer to home. These books evoke an emotional reaction to the characters. His later work set on the border, reflects a world of great natural beauty and incredible human savagery. I prefer the earlier works, although this may just be a matter of personal taste. This is a really fine book, as are most of the works of this excellent writer.
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Format: Taschenbuch
Rich, biblical prose. Set in the South. The best bar in all literature, set in a Gap, leaning out over a gorge, swaying with the wild partiers in the storm...when the porch starts to give way.... Great old hound: I bet he beats Faulkner's. Great old man: stubborn as a mule, refusing to participate in anything he considers unworthy, unmanly, not right---give me liberty or give me death---it really doesn't go out of style, even though such an orientation might get you labeled as disturbed.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 70 Rezensionen
66 von 70 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Great style, slow going 21. Juni 2006
Von Poogy - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Having read McCarthy's last five novels I developed into a big fan. I don't know of anyone else with his mastery of the language and ability to write razor-sharp, spot-on colloquial dialogue. So I thought I'd give his first novel a try. The incredible descriptions of nature are there, in more or less full flower, and several characters are memorable. The problem for me was that relatively little happens. I kept waiting, and waiting, and although he tossed in a little bit towards the end, in terms of plot it's like a 250-page short story. Don't get me wrong; I wasn't looking for a beach book or Tom Clancy, but in truth it's nice to have someone do something every once in a while beyond walking through the woods. So it's fascinating as a stylistic exercise, but less than compelling as entertainment. If you're hoping for something along the lines of All The Pretty Horses, you may be disappointed; much more disappointed if you're expecting anything as sparsely written and plot-driven as The Road or No Country For Old Men. If you love fabulous use of language for its own sake, you won't be.
35 von 36 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Not too shabby to be McCarthy's first 4. Februar 2004
Von Faulknernut - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
THE ORCHARD KEEPER, Cormac McCarthy's first novel, explores the nature of new versus old ways of life. It's a novel on nature. It deals primarily with three men: John Wesley, a young man coming of age; Marion Sylder, a bootlegger; and Uncle Ather, a hilarious, elderly man who refuses to take any crap from anyone. While these three run into each other throughout the novel, they are also connected to each other in a way through which none of them are aware--through the death of Kenneth Rattner. McCarthy's novel appears to be more of a character analysis than a plot driven story. While a plot does exist, it is not incredibly strong nor prominent. It's more like a series of anecdotes. However, the character depth and symbolism found in the pages of this book are tremendously wonderful. It's definitely a book worth reading again in order to catch all of these symbols and meanings. I would recommend this book to people who enjoy analyzing works, not someone who is just looking for something pleasurable to read. It's definitely not like reading Harry Potter : ). For example, at the beginning of this work, the narrator jumps from person to person, telling part of each one's story with little or no signal of whom is being spoken of. You have to take your time to figure out who the narrator is talking about. This can be rather frustrating at first, so beware! However, if you can tolerate this writing style and don't expect much of a plot, the piece is rather enjoyable, filled with comic elements and brilliance.
52 von 60 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Astonishing at times, frustrating at other times 14. März 2000
Von R. Mathes - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I am a big William Faulkner fan and after reading the great four (Absalom.., As I Lay Dying, Light In August, and The Sound...) tried All the Pretty Horses a few years ago. Everyone said it was great so like a good prisoner of the "you must read this syndrone", I started it. I found it incredibly beautiful in terms of prose style and language but after 100 or so pages I did not really care about the characters. I thought it was my fault and not McCarthy's so I left it and decided that I would reapproach it later on. It is now three years later and I figured I would read his first book before I started the now completed Border trilogy.
This is a tremendously artful and in many ways wonderful book. Nobody since Faulkner has as dense and intense a prose style. You must have an unabridged dictionary beside you to really get everything he gives you. The reason I write this review is for those who want a deep, meaningful book and are thinking of reading this like I was. If you are such a person and do not have alot of time on your hands, I would suggest going elsewhere for one reason only. Another Amazon reader talked about the plot of this novel as being extraordinarily inconsequential. I think that this is McCarthy's point. It is a story about the land and people that personify independance. It is about an age of rural Southern life that no longer exists. It is not supposed to tie it's points up in ribbons and to keep you passionately turning pages unless your there for the art of it (of which there is a considerable amount).
My frustration was that when I finished this, I got it and appreciated it but was not particularly moved in any way. I read the last three chapters again to see if I was an idiot or if this was just an erudite, muted text. I came out of it thinking that that's exactly what it was. If you haven't read the four big Faulkner's or All the Pretty Horses, start there, this is a book written by a master but it left me too lukewarm to give it more than three stars.
15 von 15 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
McCarthy finds the beauty in desperation 28. April 1997
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
In 1930s rural Tennessee, men from three generations play out their lives in ignorance of a secret that binds them together. John Wesley Rattner is a young boy aiming to make a living from trapping muskrats. Marion Sylder is the bootlegger who, years before, killed Rattner's itinerant father. Ather Ownby is the old man who alone knows where the body of Kenneth Rattner lies rotting to nothing.

McCarthy tells their story of `profound inconsequence' in language of exotic precision. They are bound together through their relationship with nature and the land which offers up little sustenance but imbues their lives of dispossessed independence with meaning. In his prose, McCarthy elevates the everyday to a poetic significance, with some of the richest descriptions of the unforgiving natural world to be found anywhere. A bird on the wing, a wind in the trees, a car on a mountain road: he handles each image with equal skill, so that we exist with them in that place and time.

McCarthy treads the fine line between pathos and bathos, walking with sure steps, so that we feel for his subject - men hunting, the animals they hunt, the landscape as part of which they exist - but we never feel sorry. His dialogue is sparse, but loaded, with a natural rhythm you may have thought lost to the world. McCarthy finds the beauty in desperation and depicts it unsentimentally. While his story is a guiltless one of violence and resignation in the face of material poverty, his subject is `all questions ever pressed upon humanity and beyond understanding'. Except McCarthy appears to understand them, and is able to explicate them.
12 von 13 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Typical McCarthy - but that is a good thing 13. November 2000
Von Jim Fox - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Having read all of McCarthy's other books already, I came into this knowing what to expect as far a style and content. And I was not disappointed. McCarthy can better develop a character in two sentences than most authors can in two chapters. The vivid description of the mountains, the people, and their culture puts the reader right there in the story. These harsh, terse, and somehow always beautiful images will remain in my mind for a long, long time. I found this story a little more abstract than most of McCarthy's other works, yet I was able to see his message in the end. Required reading for any McCarthy fan.
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