Gloria E. Salavarria (skaggs@michiana.org)

 
Erhaltene "Hilfreich"-Stimmen für Rezensionen: 100% (7 von 7)
Ort: Middlebury, IN
 

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Charles at Fifty von Anthony Holden
Charles at Fifty von Anthony Holden
Although some may find fault with the author for criticizing Charles more than Diana, frankly Charles is more 'accident prone' so it's beyond me how any even-handed author could write anything about the Charles/Diana events without sounding too pro-Diana.
Though well intentioned at heart, Charles is a product of his breeding--not just the man warped by being surrounded by sycophants but a man who has inherited the Hanover/Windsor genetic faults. First among these is the fact that Charles, like his great-grandfather George V, is not too bright. Unlike George V, he wants to be seen as bright and this is what leads him into trouble. Charles's lack of focus and desire to meddle in… Mehr dazu
Writing for Story: Craft Secrets of Dramatic Nonfi&hellip von Jonathan Franklin
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Real Write-Stuff, 3. November 1998
How to Write books are irresistible to the novice writer: 'Read me and I'll tell you what you need to know to be famous, or at least published.' At first the reader is thrilled when he or she recognizes a kindred spirit in the author, then the reader tries to apply what he or she learned. More often than not the lessons of the book are little more than a collection of the author's war stories. The novice writer suspects that writing is an art form, not subject to the laws of physics. Jon Franklin says: 'No, good short stories have form, structure and behavior patterns that can be analyzed.'
The workaday world of journalism, not academia, honed Franklin's skills. He served his… Mehr dazu
Writing for Story: Craft Secrets of Dramatic Nonfi&hellip von Jonathan Franklin
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Real Write-Stuff, 24. Oktober 1998
How to Write books are irresistible to the novice writer: 'Read me and I'll tell you what you need to know to be famous, or at least published.' At first the reader is thrilled when he or she recognizes a kindred spirit in the author, then the reader tries to apply what he or she learned. More often than not the lessons of the book are little more than a collection of the author's war stories. The novice writer suspects that writing is an art form, not subject to the laws of physics. Jon Franklin says: 'No, good short stories have form, structure and behavior patterns that can be analyzed.'
The workaday world of journalism, not academia, honed Franklin's skills. He served his… Mehr dazu