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Rezensionen verfasst von
Sanjeev S. Selvaraj (Boston, MA)
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Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior
Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior
von Chögyam Trungpa
  Taschenbuch

1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen An essential work...from a warrior's perspective, 22. Juni 2000
Need I summarize or paraphrase any more of this wonderful book? Need I tout the wisdom contained in this small volume any more than what has already been said by the other dozen or so reviews? I wish to offer a different perspective, if I may: that of a martial artist and a warrior. I have been a student of Korean and Japanese martial arts for well over a decade, with special emphasis on the spiritual and philosophical side of the arts. The Japanese concept of Bushido, the way of the warrior, has been an especially powerful guiding force in my life, as well as in the lives of many of my fellow martial arts students, philosophy students, and close loved ones. Duty, honor, humility, and loyalty, as taught in Bushdo, are among the cornerstones of this way of life and mode of thought; and these concepts do, indeed, mean virtually everything to the modern-day warrior.
So where does this work fit in? It can quite easily and effectively influence all people's lives for the better. This book teaches that we can become free of our fear in order to become "gentle and genuine". Thus awakening the goodness inherent within her/himself, the warrior becomes free to help those around her or him to achieve such enlightenment.
Reviews such as these simply cannot do such teaching proper justice. The impact it has on warriors in today's world is extremely deep, on a personal and emotional level. Heck, it even made me cry a couple times! So, to summarize, this book is indeed a boon for all people, regardless of faith. But it is my sincere belief that to a true warrior, martial artist or not, this book is absolutely essential for defining one's path, choosing which wars to fight, and ultimately for seeking peace.


Bushido: The Warrior's Code (Literary Links to the Orient)
Bushido: The Warrior's Code (Literary Links to the Orient)
von Charles Lucas
  Taschenbuch

3.0 von 5 Sternen Historically informative, but not spiritually enlightening, 5. Juni 2000
This was undoubtedly one of the most informative books on the subject of Bushido I've read, but there are very particular issues I have with it. First, the source of these issues perhaps lies in the author: though he is Japanese, there is no doubt in my mind from the reading that he is a Western thinker, of staunch Christian upbringing. Though he is an excellent historian, he is by no means a bushi, nor is he in any way an Eastern thinker (much of bushido derives from Japanese Zen Buddhism).
What this leads to is typically insensitive, Eurocentric judgements of the way of life of the warriors of feudal Japan. For instance, I found very distasteful his treatment of young, "hot-headed" bushi rushing to commit seppuku, ritualized honorable suicide, without supposedly proper motivation. To have treated this matter and other such topics with full understanding and sensitivity, the author would have had to be a warrior, himself. Evidently, he was not. Had he been, fundamental concepts such as honor and duty would have wholly changed his point of view.
Further, though his points are made with great attention to historical detail, he tends to emphasize denial of the self and other aspects of discipline, whereas a historian who was also a modern warrior would have emphasized, among other things, the intertwining of life and death. These things that lie at the heart of bushi would have explained, for instance, seppuku far better.
Ultimately, the decision to read this book should be based on what the reader wants. If he or she seeks a straight-forward explanation of the tenents of bushido with little else, the overall excellent history presented in this book should be quite sufficient. If the reader wants, however, a more spiritual treatise delving into the philosophical origins of bushido, for the benefit of modern bushi, this book falls short.


Bushido: The Warrior's Code (Literary Links to the Orient)
Bushido: The Warrior's Code (Literary Links to the Orient)
von Charles Lucas
  Taschenbuch

0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Historically informative, but not spiritually enlightening, 5. Juni 2000
This was undoubtedly one of the most informative books on the subject of Bushido I've read, but there are very particular issues I have with it. First, the source of these issues perhaps lies in the author: though he is Japanese, there is no doubt in my mind from the reading that he is a Western thinker, of staunch Christian upbringing. Though he is an excellent historian, he is by no means a bushi, nor is he in any way an Eastern thinker (much of bushido derives from Japanese Zen Buddhism).
What this leads to is typically insensitive, Eurocentric judgements of the way of life of the warriors of feudal Japan. For instance, I found very distasteful his treatment of young, "hot-headed" bushi rushing to commit seppuku, ritualized honorable suicide, without supposedly proper motivation. To have treated this matter and other such topics with full understanding and sensitivity, the author would have had to be a warrior, himself. Evidently, he was not. Had he been, fundamental concepts such as honor and duty would have wholly changed his point of view.
Further, though his points are made with great attention to historical detail, he tends to emphasize denial of the self and other aspects of discipline, whereas a historian who was also a modern warrior would have emphasized, among other things, the intertwining of life and death. These things that lie at the heart of bushi would have explained, for instance, seppuku far better.
Ultimately, the decision to read this book should be based on what the reader wants. If he or she seeks a straight-forward explanation of the tenents of bushido with little else, the overall excellent history presented in this book should be quite sufficient. If the reader wants, however, a more spiritual treatise delving into the philosophical origins of bushido, for the benefit of modern bushi, this book falls short.


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