Profil für Ralph Blumenau > Rezensionen

Persönliches Profil

Beiträge von Ralph Blumenau
Top-Rezensenten Rang: 15.373
Hilfreiche Bewertungen: 194

Richtlinien: Erfahren Sie mehr über die Regeln für "Meine Seite@Amazon.de".

Rezensionen verfasst von
Ralph Blumenau (London United Kingdom)

Anzeigen:  
Seite: 1 | 2 | 3
pixel
Ideen. Das Buch Le Grand
Ideen. Das Buch Le Grand
Preis: EUR 0,00

5.0 von 5 Sternen Ein idiosynkratischer Liebesbrief, 5. Mai 2014
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Ideen. Das Buch Le Grand (Kindle Edition)
A discursive letter about himself written to a woman whom, at the end, we find Heine was in love with. Witty, learned, subversive, francophile, imaginative, free-wheeling, almost stream-of-consciousness, romantic (with tongue in cheek?).


Noble Endeavours: The Life of Two Countries, England and Germany, in Many Stories
Noble Endeavours: The Life of Two Countries, England and Germany, in Many Stories
von Miranda Seymour
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 18,95

2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting, but not well organized or presented, 8. April 2014
Miranda Seymour is dismayed by the fact that nearly 70 years after the end of the Second World War the popular media still play on a negative image of the Germans. She has collected a large number of stories of friendly, mutually admiring and/or creative encounters and also marriages between Britons and Germans from 1613 onwards. Some of these are well-known: literary figures, artists, diplomats and politicians; but the majority of them are not. We are introduced to a plethora of unfamiliar individuals. Miranda Seymour is an experienced writer of fiction, non-fiction and children's books; so it is surprising that here her writing is in a few places dense to the point of near-indigestibility as we are swamped with names and with relationships which are hard to remember: an appendix with a few family trees or an expansion of the individual index entries would have been very helpful. Elsewhere the book is more readable, and there are many anecdotes, some amusing, some sad, some touching.

The author knows a great deal about the lives of her characters and feels compelled to spill out everything she knows, so much so that there is a frequent loss of focus on the book's theme, Anglo-German relations; and I also think there is sometimes more detail about political events than is needed. The book is something of a mishmash of high politics and private lives.

The heyday of friendly feelings between the two countries was the period between the late 1790s and 1880s. A large number of Germans actually came to live in Britain - in the 1840s there were some 30,000 German immigrants: workers many of whom spoke no English, and of course middle and upper-class Germans who were attracted to a country ruled by a German dynasty. (I did not know that Queen Victoria's first language was German and that in private she and Albert would speak in German). There do not seem to have been anything like that number of Britons who lived in Germany, although many of them travelled there, visiting its sights, its courts, and its intellectuals.

Miranda Seymour does not ignore the rough patches, even during the time when on the whole the relationships were for the most part positive. She doesn't deal with the anti-Hanoverian British politicians during the reigns of George I and George II; but she does show that there was some antagonism in England to Prince Albert because he was a German; there was deep antagonism which Bismarck whipped up against the "English" influence of Crown Princess (later briefly Empress) Victoria. The book charts the ambivalence of the emotionally unstable William II's attitude to England. And by the 1890s the British and German empires had started on a collision course which put a damper on the previously cordial relations not only between the two governments but also on those between their citizens. But a number of prominent Britons and Germans worked hard for continuing Anglo-German friendship.

When the First World War comes, Miranda Seymour shows, among the jubilation of the crowds and the excesses in both countries (internments of civilians, the banning of each others' music etc), the heartbreak of many German Anglophiles and British Germanophiles. Some of them retained and even professed their love for the "enemy" country throughout the war.

After that war some Britons condemned the harshness of the Treaty of Versailles, felt sorry for the state of post-war Germany, and worked to bring Germany back into the community of nations. A few fell under the spell of Hitler and sympathized with his incipient movement and, later, with the Nazi regime, while Hitler himself, in Mein Kampf, envisioned a partnership between natural allies, a ruthless England controlling a maritime Empire and a ruthless Germany dominating the continent of Europe. There were Englishmen who were thrilled by the libertarian and cultural life of Berlin during the Weimar Republic and who were of course appalled by the rise of the Nazis. There is a chapter about English teenagers or a little older, boys and girls, still travelling to Nazi Germany to live with German families and simply having a good time, some of them "unscathed by the evidence that anything might be amiss in this disciplined and glittering world". But then The Times, the Daily Mail and the Daily Express all played down the horrors of what was happening in Germany. The heavily aristocratic Anglo-German Association, founded in 1929 to further understanding between the two nations, shed its Jewish Chairman in 1933 and (re-named the Anglo-German Fellowship in 1935) and cultivated (and was eagerly cultivated by) Hitler's ambassador, von Ribbentrop, who came to the conclusion that England would never fight Germany. (The chapter dealing with these aristocrats is called, perhaps punningly, "Noble Endeavours" - but it seems a curious title for the book as a whole.) Altogether, British and especially German aristocrats play a disproportionate role in the book as a whole.

There is relatively little about Germans who established connections with England during the Weimar period - one exception being the German Rhodes scholars at Oxford, one of whom was Adam von Trott who was executed for the July 20th plot against Hitler in 1944. All that changed as Germans, mostly Jews, sought refuge in England after 1933. The most fortunate ones were the intellectuals who benefitted from the Academic Assistance Council created in 1933. They were followed by such floods of refugees as were permitted by British immigration rules. Many middle class refugees found sponsorships for employment as domestic servants or other such work. In 1938 the Quakers managed to get the Home Office to accept refugee children (the Kindertransport), even if their parents had to stay behind. In 1940 many of the adults who had managed to come as refugees were (mostly for only a short time) interned on the Isle of Man as "enemy aliens", together with non-refugee Germans, some of them Nazi sympathizers, who had lived in Britain for some time.

The books ends with two stories about prisoners of war. In Bavaria British pows in Bavaria performed, to enthusiastic applause by their Nazi guards, of plays by Shakespeare - suggesting the possibility of new bridges being built between Britain and Germany after the war. And in Britain two German-born Jews, Herbert Sulzbach and Heiz Koeppler, were astonishingly successful in re-educating, at Featherstone Park and Wilton Park respectively, a large number of Nazi-indoctrinated prisoners of war. Sulzbach would receive over 3,000 letters of gratitude.

It is a pity that the book ends in 1945 and so does not explore the new relationships which, despite much media harping on the Nazi period, did in fact grow between the two countries.


Die Schlafwandler: Wie Europa in den Ersten Weltkrieg zog
Die Schlafwandler: Wie Europa in den Ersten Weltkrieg zog
von Christopher Clark
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 39,99

62 von 77 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Selbst nach Sarajevo war der Ausbruch des Weltkriegs nicht unvermeidlich, 17. September 2013
Clark beginnt seinen ausgezeichneten Bericht über die Ereignisse, die dem Ausbruch des Ersten Weltkriegs vorangingen, mit einer sich über 96 Seiten erstreckenden Schilderung (fast ein Fünftel des Buches) der Vorkriegsgeschichte Serbiens, unter der Obrenovic-Dynastie mit den Königen Milan (1868 bis 1889) und dessen autokratischem Sohn Alexandar (sic) (1889 bis 1903). Beide Monarchen waren Österreich zugeneigt und übergingen das intensive Nationalgefühl des serbischen Volkes und Teilen der serbischen Armee, welche das große serbische Reich, wie es im Mittelalter unter Zar Dusan existiert hatte, wiederherstellen wollten. Diese unpopuläre Politik der Könige war ein Grund - jedoch nicht der einzige - für den blutigen Schlag einer Gruppe von Offizieren gegen diese Dynastie im Jahre 1903, mit dem die Dynastie der Karageorgevic als neue Herrscherin eingesetzt wurde und unter dem großen Beifall der Bevölkerung eine gegen Österreich gerichtete pro-russische Außenpolitik begann. Die Offiziere, die diesen Putsch durchgeführt hatten und von einem Mann mit dem Spitznamen Apis geführt wurden, setzten eine aufrührerische Politik der serbischen Minderheit in Österreich-Ungarn in Gang und ermordeten auch immer wieder habsburgische Beamte. Premierminister Pasic, ebenfalls ein Nationalist, war über die illegalen Aktionen besorgt, konnte sie jedoch nicht bremsen. Apis war der Leiter des serbischen militärischen Geheimdienstes (man fühlt sich stark an Pakistan erinnert). Als Pasic von den Plänen zur Ermordung des östereichischen Thronfolgers Franz Ferdinand erfuhr, schickte er zwar über den serbischen Botschafter in Wien "eine Art Warnung" an einen oesterreischischen Minister, der aber die Nachricht nicht ernst nahm und sie nicht an seine Vorgesetzten weiter gab.

Hier setzt Clark zu einem weiter gerichteten Blick auf Europa an, auf die langsame und zögerliche Ausbildung von Allianzen, die in den Krieg hineingezogen wurden. Diese Szenerie ist zwar bekannt, jedoch widerspricht Clark einer Reihe von herkömmlichen Ansichten. So legt er etwa dar, dass die britische Presse eine Furcht vor dem deutschen Flottenbau schürte, die britischen Minister sich darüber jedoch keine großen Sorgen machten und auch keinen Anlass dafür gehabt hätten: im Jahre 1905 verfügte das Deutsche Reich nur über 16 Schlachtschiffe, Großbritannien dagegen über 44; und im Jahre 1913 beendete Berlin ohnehin das Wettrüsten aus eigenem Antrieb. Dennoch hatten inzwischen entscheidende britische Poltiker das Reich als Hauptfeind ausgemacht, vielleicht schon seit dem Krüger-Telegramm (welches Clark hier in eine weitere Perspective setzt die mir bislang unbekannt war).. Er unterstreicht die britische Arroganz, mit welcher jede Ausweitung des Empires gerechtfertigt, jedes deutsche Streben nach Einfluss dagegen abgelehnt wurde. So wurde sofort protestiert, als Deutschland eine Eisenbahnlinie als Verbindung zwischen Transvaal und einem Hafen in Mozambique baute. Merkwürdigerweise werden in diesem sehr detaillierten Buch die drei Reisen von Joseph Chamberlain nach Berlin in den Jahren 1898, 1899 und 1901 nicht erwähnt, deren Ziel es war, ein mögliches Bündnis mit dem Reich zu sondieren. Erst als diese Bemühungen fehlschlugen, wandte sich London zuächst Frankreich und später Russland zu. Clark sagt aber auch, dass die Verständigung mit Frankreich und späterhin mit Russland primär gegen Deutschland gerichtet war. In der Entente mit Frankreich sieht er hauptsächlich einen Versuch, das Bündnis zwischen Frankreich und Russland zu schwächen (letzteres war in Großbritannien immer als die größte Bedrohung für das Empire betrachte worden), in der Entente mit Russland von 1907 hingegen die Ausnutzung der russischen Schwäche nach der Niederlage gegen Japan. So sollten die von Russland ausgehenden Bedrohungen, welche damals (und von einigen britischen Politkern auch noch Anfang 1914) als viel gefährlicher im Vergleich zu der Bedrohung durch das Deutsche Reich betrachtet wurden, aus dem Wege geräumt werden.

Es folgt ein faszinierends und detailliertes Kapitel in dem aufgezeigt wird, dass alle Großmächten immer wieder durch eine Unsicherheit über die eigentliche Leitung ihrer Aussenpolitik behindert wurden: lag die Führung bei den Monarchen? bei den Regierungchefs? bei den Außenministern? bei den Beamten des Außenministeriums? Bei den im Ausland tätigen Botschaftern? beim Militär? bei den Finanzministern?). Die Rivalität dieser Instanzen verursachte die Schwankungen in der Politik, besonders zwischen aggressiven und versöhnliche Schritten. Das wird häufig übersehen, wenn wir die Dinge hinterher nur als einen Marsch wahrnehmen der unaufhaltsam zu dem Zusammenprall von 1914 führen musste. Die eingehende Schilderung der Agadir-Krise von 1911 ist ein überzeugendes Beispiel für das Wechselspiel rivalisierender Zielsetzungen innnerhalb der Regierungen von Frankreich, Deutschland, und sogar Großbritannien.

Clark zeigt schließlich auf, wie brüchig die verschiedenen Bündnisse in den letzten drei Jahren vor dem Ausbruch des Krieges erschienen: wie sich London weiterhin Sorgen wegen russischer Aktivitäten im Mittleren und Fernen Osten machte und einen Austritt Russlands aus der Triple Entente befürchtete; wie sich Frankreich und Großbritannien den russischen Wünschen nach einer Öffnung der Dardanellen wideretzten; wie groß das Misstrauen Frankreichs in Bezug auf eine britische Unterstützung im Ernstfall war; wie Österreich das Deutsche Reich in der Agadir-Krise im Stich ließ und das Reich seinerseits Österreich in den beiden Balkankriegen nicht half; wie sogar Italien, bevor es die Seiten wechselte, nach dem habsburgischen Dalmatien gierte und die Interessen Österreichs und Deutschlands, seiner Partner im Dreibund, missachtete, als es im Jahre 1911 die Türkei angriff. Bis in den Juli 1914 hinein, als sich beide Seiten für einen - wie jede von ihnen meinte - Defensivkrieg rüsteten, bestand immer noch die Möglichkeit, dass die jeweiligen inneren Spannungen einen Krieg gegen den äußeren Feind verhindern würden.

Das Buch endet mit einer spannenden Schilderung der Zeitspanne zwischen den Morden in Sarajevo und dem Ausbruch des Krieges einen Monat später. Selbst in den letzten Tagen dieser Periode gab es noch Zuckungen. Bis hin zur russischen Mobilisierung hofften die Deutschen, die Oesterreich zu dem Ultimatuman Serbien ermutigt hatten, dass der sich daraus ergebende Krieg auf diese beiden Länder eingrenzbar sei. In Russland schwankte man zwischen einer Teilmobilisierung gegen Oesterreich oder einer Totalmobilisierung gegen Österreich und Deutschland, Noch am 1. August sagte Grey dem französischen Botschafter, sein Kabinett habe sich gegen eine britische Teilnahme am Krieg entschieden. Clark konzentriet sich sich hauptsächlich auf die alltäglichen diplomatischen Aktivitäten, und diese waren so beeinflusst von menschlichen Ängsten, Hemmungen und Sindesänderungen, dass man das Endergebnis nicht als vorbestimmt betrachten kann.

(Englische Rezension übersetzt von Thomas Dunskus.)
Kommentar Kommentare (2) | Kommentar als Link | Neuester Kommentar: Apr 11, 2014 10:32 AM MEST


The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914
The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914
von Christopher Clark
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 17,95

17 von 18 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Selbst nach Sarajevo war der Ausbruch des Weltkriegs nicht unvermeidlich, 31. August 2013
Clark beginnt seinen ausgezeichneten Bericht über die Ereignisse, die dem Ausbruch des Ersten Weltkriegs vorangingen, mit einer sich über 96 Seiten erstreckenden Schilderung (fast ein Fünftel des Buches) der Vorkriegsgeschichte Serbiens, unter der Obrenovic-Dynastie mit den Königen Milan (1868 bis 1889) und dessen autokratischem Sohn Alexandar (sic) (1889 bis 1903). Beide Monarchen waren Österreich zugeneigt und übergingen das intensive Nationalgefühl des serbischen Volkes und Teilen der serbischen Armee, welche das große serbische Reich, wie es im Mittelalter unter Zar Dusan existiert hatte, wiederherstellen wollten. Diese unpopuläre Politik der Könige war ein Grund - jedoch nicht der einzige - für den blutigen Schlag einer Gruppe von Offizieren gegen diese Dynastie im Jahre 1903, mit dem die Dynastie der Karageorgevic als neue Herrscherin eingesetzt wurde und unter dem großen Beifall der Bevölkerung eine gegen Österreich gerichtete pro-russische Außenpolitik begann. Die Offiziere, die diesen Putsch durchgeführt hatten und von einem Mann mit dem Spitznamen Apis geführt wurden, setzten eine aufrührerische Politik der serbischen Minderheit in Österreich-Ungarn in Gang und ermordeten auch immer wieder habsburgische Beamte. Premierminister Pasic, ebenfalls ein Nationalist, war über die illegalen Aktionen besorgt, konnte sie jedoch nicht bremsen. Apis war der Leiter des serbischen militärischen Geheimdienstes (man fühlt sich stark an Pakistan erinnert). Als Pasic von den Plänen zur Ermordung des östereichischen Thronfolgers Franz Ferdinand erfuhr, schickte er zwar über den serbischen Botschafter in Wien "eine Art Warnung" an einen oesterreischischen Minister, der aber die Nachricht nicht ernst nahm und sie nicht an seine Vorgesetzten weiter gab.

Hier setzt Clark zu einem weiter gerichteten Blick auf Europa an, auf die langsame und zögerliche Ausbildung von Allianzen, die in den Krieg hineingezogen wurden. Diese Szenerie ist zwar bekannt, jedoch widerspricht Clark einer Reihe von herkömmlichen Ansichten. So legt er etwa dar, dass die britische Presse eine Furcht vor dem deutschen Flottenbau schürte, die britischen Minister sich darüber jedoch keine großen Sorgen machten und auch keinen Anlass dafür gehabt hätten: im Jahre 1905 verfügte das Deutsche Reich nur über 16 Schlachtschiffe, Großbritannien dagegen über 44; und im Jahre 1913 beendete Berlin ohnehin das Wettrüsten aus eigenem Antrieb. Dennoch hatten inzwischen entscheidende britische Poltiker das Reich als Hauptfeind ausgemacht, vielleicht schon seit dem Krüger-Telegramm (welches Clark hier in eine weitere Perspective setzt die mir bislang unbekannt war).. Er unterstreicht die britische Arroganz, mit welcher jede Ausweitung des Empires gerechtfertigt, jedes deutsche Streben nach Einfluss dagegen abgelehnt wurde. So wurde sofort protestiert, als Deutschland eine Eisenbahnlinie als Verbindung zwischen Transvaal und einem Hafen in Mozambique baute. Merkwürdigerweise werden in diesem sehr detaillierten Buch die drei Reisen von Joseph Chamberlain nach Berlin in den Jahren 1898, 1899 und 1901 nicht erwähnt, deren Ziel es war, ein mögliches Bündnis mit dem Reich zu sondieren. Erst als diese Bemühungen fehlschlugen, wandte sich London zuächst Frankreich und später Russland zu. Clark sagt aber auch, dass die Verständigung mit Frankreich und späterhin mit Russland primär gegen Deutschland gerichtet war. In der Entente mit Frankreich sieht er hauptsächlich einen Versuch, das Bündnis zwischen Frankreich und Russland zu schwächen (letzteres war in Großbritannien immer als die größte Bedrohung für das Empire betrachte worden), in der Entente mit Russland von 1907 hingegen die Ausnutzung der russischen Schwäche nach der Niederlage gegen Japan. So sollten die von Russland ausgehenden Bedrohungen, welche damals (und von einigen britischen Politkern auch noch Anfang 1914) als viel gefährlicher im Vergleich zu der Bedrohung durch das Deutsche Reich betrachtet wurden, aus dem Wege geräumt werden.

Es folgt ein faszinierends und detailliertes Kapitel in dem aufgezeigt wird, dass alle Großmächten immer wieder durch eine Unsicherheit über die eigentliche Leitung ihrer Aussenpolitik behindert wurden: lag die Führung bei den Monarchen? bei den Regierungchefs? bei den Außenministern? bei den Beamten des Außenministeriums? Bei den im Ausland tätigen Botschaftern? beim Militär? bei den Finanzministern?). Die Rivalität dieser Instanzen verursachte die Schwankungen in der Politik, besonders zwischen aggressiven und versöhnliche Schritten. Das wird häufig übersehen, wenn wir die Dinge hinterher nur als einen Marsch wahrnehmen der unaufhaltsam zu dem Zusammenprall von 1914 führen musste. Die eingehende Schilderung der Agadir-Krise von 1911 ist ein überzeugendes Beispiel für das Wechselspiel rivalisierender Zielsetzungen innnerhalb der Regierungen von Frankreich, Deutschland, und sogar Großbritannien.

Clark zeigt schließlich auf, wie brüchig die verschiedenen Bündnisse in den letzten drei Jahren vor dem Ausbruch des Krieges erschienen: wie sich London weiterhin Sorgen wegen russischer Aktivitäten im Mittleren und Fernen Osten machte und einen Austritt Russlands aus der Triple Entente befürchtete; wie sich Frankreich und Großbritannien den russischen Wünschen nach einer Öffnung der Dardanellen wideretzten; wie groß das Misstrauen Frankreichs in Bezug auf eine britische Unterstützung im Ernstfall war; wie Österreich das Deutsche Reich in der Agadir-Krise im Stich ließ und das Reich seinerseits Österreich in den beiden Balkankriegen nicht half; wie sogar Italien, bevor es die Seiten wechselte, nach dem habsburgischen Dalmatien gierte und die Interessen Österreichs und Deutschlands, seiner Partner im Dreibund, missachtete, als es im Jahre 1911 die Türkei angriff. Bis in den Juli 1914 hinein, als sich beide Seiten für einen - wie jede von ihnen meinte - Defensivkrieg rüsteten, bestand immer noch die Möglichkeit, dass die jeweiligen inneren Spannungen einen Krieg gegen den äußeren Feind verhindern würden.

Das Buch endet mit einer spannenden Schilderung der Zeitspanne zwischen den Morden in Sarajevo und dem Ausbruch des Krieges einen Monat später. Selbst in den letzten Tagen dieser Periode gab es noch Zuckungen. Bis hin zur russischen Mobilisierung hofften die Deutschen, die Oesterreich zu dem Ultimatuman Serbien ermutigt hatten, dass der sich daraus ergebende Krieg auf diese beiden Länder eingrenzbar sei. In Russland schwankte man zwischen einer Teilmobilisierung gegen Oesterreich oder einer Totalmobilisierung gegen Österreich und Deutschland, Noch am 1. August sagte Grey dem französischen Botschafter, sein Kabinett habe sich gegen eine britische Teilnahme am Krieg entschieden. Clark konzentriet sich sich hauptsächlich auf die alltäglichen diplomatischen Aktivitäten, und diese waren so beeinflusst von menschlichen Ängsten, Hemmungen und Sindesänderungen, dass man das Endergebnis nicht als vorbestimmt betrachten kann.

(Englische Rezension übersetzt von Thomas Dunskus.)


Tagebücher 1918-1937 (insel taschenbuch)
Tagebücher 1918-1937 (insel taschenbuch)
von Wolfgang Pfeiffer-Belli
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 20,00

2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Politik und Aesthetik, 8. Juli 2012
Hier haben wir sozusagen Geschichte in Zeitlupe, wie dies bei Tagebüchern eigentlich auch gar nicht anders möglich ist. Vor allem Leser, die bereits mit der Geschichte Deutschlands in den Jahren zwischen 1918 und 1937 vertraut sind, werden hier auf ihre Kosten kommen, allerdings werden auch sie sich immer wieder nach Fußnoten sehnen, mit einer näheren Beschreibung der Personen oder sogar der Ereignisse, die Kessler erwähnt. In der mir vorliegenden Kindle-Ausgabe gibt es keine solche Hilfe und jemand, der nur eine vage Kenntnis der damaligen Zeit hat, wird das "Buch" vermutlich bald aus der Hand legen.

Dieser Teil der Tagebücher (ein Drittel des Gesamtumfangs, die Aufzeichnungen beginnen im Jahre 1880) setzt bei Kesslers kurzer Tätigkeit als Deutscher Botschafter im neu entstandenen Polen ein; Druck seitens polnischer Nationalisten sollte diese Periode nach nur sieben Wochen beenden.

Kessler kehrt nach Berlin zurück und wird dort im Januar 1919 Zeuge der zunehmenden Militanz der Spartakisten, deren Aufstand jedoch nach einigen Tagen von den Freikorps blutig niedergeschlagen wird. Er reagiert entsetzt auf die Übergriffe des Militärs, die mit ihren Morden und Morddrohungen noch bis weit ins Jahr 1920 fortdauerten.

Er war eigentlich ein Snob, der sich gegen kleinbürgerliche Ideen und vulgären Geschmack wendete, wie er dies Kaiser Wilhelm II., aber auch vielen Politikern der Weimarer Republik ankreidete - er blickte mit aristokratischem Hochmut auf sie herab. Eitel war er natürlich auch und so vermerkt er jedes ihm gemachte Kompliment und jeden "stürmischen Applaus" den seine Reden hervorrufen. Andererseits hat er Sympathien für Idealisten der Arbeiterklasse, wie Liebknecht und Rosa Luxemburg und hat zahlreiche pro-spartakistische Freunde. Viele Menschen, im Reich wie auch im Ausland, sahen in ihm einen Bolschewisten. Er gab sich als Sozialist aus, war jedoch Mitglied der liberalen Deutschen Demokratischen Partei (DDP). Er war von Deutschlands Schuld am Ersten Weltkrieg überzeugt und betrachtete den Krieg als ein verbrecherisches Abenteuer, in welches das Reich von grotesken Narren gezerrt worden war.

Der Völkerbund mit seiner Ansammlung von Nationalstaaten war ihm sehr zuwider; bei weitem hätte er einen Bund von Organisationen aller Art vorgezogen (Arbeitsgeber, Gewerkschaften, Kirchen, usw.) und war unermüdlich in seinem Bemühen, diese Idee in Wort und Schrift, im In- und Ausland, den Menschen nahezubringen; seine Veranstaltungen waren häufig bis zum Bersten gefüllt.

Im Jahre 1922 nahm er an der Konferenz in Genua teil, von der sich Deutschland eine gewisse Linderung seiner Reparationen und die junge Sowjetunion eine Aufbauhilfe erhofft hatte. Als daraus nichts wurde, fanden sich die beiden Verlierer in Rapallo zu einem Vertrag zusammen. Rathenaus Rolle dabei erboste die extreme Rechte und führte zu seiner Ermordung im gleichen Jahre. Kessler beschreibt wortreich die mit Rathenaus Beisetzung verbundenen Feiern (wie auch später die Feiern nach Stresemanns Tod im Jahre 1929). Er schreibt dann sogar noch ein Buch, in welchem er vielleicht Rathenau nach dem Tod mehr preist als er das zu dessen Lebzeiten getan hatte.

Im Zusammenhang mit der Ruhrbesetzung durch Frankeich versucht Kessler in London - wenn auch ohne offiziellen Auftrag - die britische Regierung zu einem Einschreiten zu bewegen; leider lassen sich diese Bemühungen, die sehr detailliert beschrieben werden, ohne genaue Fußnoten nur sehr schlecht verfolgen.

Hier sind wir in der Mitte des Buches angelangt und haben sechs Jahre (1918 - 1924) hinter uns gebracht. Die zweite Hälfte widmet sich den dreizehn folgenden Jahren bis zu Kesslers Tod 1937. (Dieses Ungleichgewicht ist auf den Herausgeber zurückzuführen: so gibt es, für 1934 nur einen kurzen Eintrag, obwohl Kessler zeit seines Lebens ein fast manischer Tagebuchschreiber war.)

Nach 1923 setzten die Regierungen ihn nur noch selten als inoffiziellen Botschafter ein und Kessler behandelt nun, in den Jahren 1924 bis 1930, vor allem Kulturelles. Die ungeheure Inflation von 1923 wird kaum erwähnt, ebensowenig wie die Währungsreform gegen Ende des gleichen Jahres, wie der Dawes-Plan oder der Locarno-Pakt von 1924, auch nicht die Katastrophe an der Wall Street fünf Jahre später oder die sich daraus ergebende massive Arbeitslosigkeit in Deutschland.

Aber dann erwacht Kessler plötzlich an einem schwarzen Tag im September 1930, als die Wahlen den Nazis 107 Sitze im Reichstag bescherten. Eine kleine Weile war er optimistisch, als Innenminister Groener im April 1932 die paramilitärischen Organisatione der Nazis verbot; doch einen Monat später waren Groener und Kanzler Brüning schon nicht mehr im Amt. Kessler machte sich zu Recht lustig über Papen, den neuen Kanzler, den er verachtete. Die Politik rückt jetzt im Tagebuch wieder stärker ins Rampenlicht, wobei Kessler allerdings nur mehr ein entsetzter Beobachter und kein aktiver Teilnehmer ist. Man warnt ihn vor persönlicher Gefahr und so verlässt er zwei Tage nach dem Reichstagsbrand Deutschland für immer und flieht nach Paris.

In Frankreich hatte er gute gesellschaftliche Verbindungen. Anfangs lud er ein, wurde eingeladen und ging wie immer fleißig ins Theater. Jedoch wurde - wie ich aus anderen Quellen weiß - das Leben dort allmählich zu teuer für ihn, sodass er im November 1933 ein Haus in Mallorca mietete. Er reiste aber auch weiterhin - nach Frankreich, nach England, in die Schweiz - und es gibt einen interessanten Bericht über ein Gespräch, das er im Juli 1935 in Paris mit dem abgesetzten Kanzler Brüning führte. Kessler ist gerade in Frankreich, als Mallorca im September 1937 in den Machtbereich des mit Hitler zusammenarbeitenden Generals Franco gerät. Er beschließt, nicht dorthin zurückzukehren und stirbt Ende November 1937 in Lyon.

Ich habe mich bislang hauptsächlich mit den politischen Aspekten der Tagebücher befasst. Er war aber auch ein unersättlicher Reisender und nimmermüder Gast und Gastgeber; er hat Gäste an seinem Frühstückstisch und beim Abendessen, wenn er nicht gerade selbst irgendwo eingeladen ist. Er beschreibt eingehend die Räume, in denen er mit Menschen zusammenkommt, wie auch die Menschen selbst und beurteilt sie schnell und abschließend. Sein Ästhetizismus scheint überall durch. Kulturelle Dinge interessierten ihn zeitlebens, und seine Gedanken dazu sind immer tiefgehend und eigenständig. Er verbringt viel Zeit im Theater und setzt sich mit den Stücken auseinander, er kommentiert die historischen Stätten, die er in Italien besucht, immer wieder als bewusst beobachtender Ästhet. Seine Freunde sind die wichtigen Vertreter ihrer Zeit, auf internationaler Ebene: Grosz und Einstein, Gerhart Hauptmann und Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Max Reinhardt und Nietzsches Schwester (deren Bewunderung für ihren Bruder er teilt, wenn auch nicht ihre reaktionären politischen Ansichten); er kennt Cocteau, Gide, Diaghilev, Rodin, Maillol (in dieser Zeit vielleicht sein engster Freund), Gordon Craig und Eric Gill. Diese letzteren drei Künstler illustrieren mit Initialen bzw. Holzschnitten viele der Bücher, die in Kesslers Kunstverlag, die Cranach Presse, erscheinen.

(Englische Rezension übersetzt von Thomas Dunskus)


Joseph Roth
Joseph Roth
von David Bronsen
  Gebundene Ausgabe

2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Das Leben eines wandernden Juden, 8. April 2012
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Joseph Roth (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Die erste Ausgabe dieses Buches kam 1974 heraus; 1992 gab es diese - gekürzte - zweite Ausgabe. Mit 345 Seiten ist diese Version etwa halb so lang wie die Originalfassung; die fehlenden Teile sind hauptsächlich als Beispiele zitierte Auszüge aus Roths Romanen, die man wohl als verfügbar ansah. Bronsens Analysen dieser Romane sind ausgezeichnet; sie zeigen, dass Roth ein großer Schriftsteller war, der in sehr verfeinerten Kategorien dachte und dass Roths in diesen Büchern zutage tretende Darstellungen immer eng mit seiner Persönlichkeit verbunden waren. Die Analysen nehmen allerdings nur einen kleinen Raum der abgekürzten Fassung ein.

Roth kam 1894 als Jude in Galizien zur Welt, als habsburgischer Untertan. Seinen Vater lernte er nie kennen, denn dieser war damals schon geisteskrank und in stationärer Behandlung. Bronsen meint, Roth habe sich eigentlich nirgendwo "zu Hause" gefühlt und sich immer als einen Außenseiter angesehen. Er hatte eine ausschweifende Phantasie und erfand eine ganze Serie sich widersprechender Geschichten über seinen Geburtsort und noch wildere über seinen Vater. Bronsen schreibt ihm zu, er habe den Kaiser Franz Joseph quasi als Vaterfigur betrachtet und sich mehr und mehr mit dem multinationalen Habsburgerreich identifiziert, obwohl er, etwa in seinem bekanntesten Roman, "Radetzkymarsch", die Verknöcherung des Reiches durchaus erkannte.

Auf Grund seines Studiums in Wien musste er bei Ausbruch des Ersten Weltkriegs nicht zum Militär, er meldete sich aber doch als Freiwilliger; wegen seiner schlechten Gesundheit kam er nicht an die Front, sondern arbeitete in einer Soldatenzeitung und zeitweise als Zensor. Seine Phantasie ging jedoch auch hier wieder mit ihm durch: er behauptete später, er habe Orden bekommen, sei nach sechs Monaten aus russischer Gefangenschaft entflohen und habe sogar zwei Monate in der Roten Armee gedient - alles unwahr.

Wie so viele Figuren in seinen Werken, fühlte er sich im Österreich der Nachkriegszeit nicht mehr zu Hause. Er wurde Journalist, schrieb Gedichte, Zeitungsartikel und Berichte und arbeitete schließlich (von 1923 bis 1933) für die liberale Frankfurter Zeitung. Mehrere seiner großen Werke erschienen zuerst als Fortsetzungsromane in der Presse. Politisch war er anfangs "fortschrittlich", antimonarchistisch und antikirchlich, sah aber den "Fortschritt" schon mit kritischen Augen, sowohl in dessen amerikanischer als auch in der sowjetischen Form. Im Laufe seines Lebens wurde er jedoch immer konservativer, trauerte dem Habsburgerreich nach und näherte sich der Katholischen Kirche. (Zuweilen ging er zur Messe, nahm das Abendmahl und behauptete, getauft geworden zu sein, wofür es keinerlei Beweise gibt und was ohnehin äußerst unwahrscheinlich ist, wenn es auch nach seinem Tode einen Streit unter seinen Freunden gab, ob er nun als Katholik oder als Jude begraben werden sollte). Kurz vor dem Anschluss Österreichs engagierte er sich politisch sogar für eine neuerliche österreichische Monarchie, in der Person von Otto von Habsburg -dieser sandte einen Kranz zu Roths Begräbnis).

Gleichzeitig stand er dem Faschismus krass ablehnend gegenüber und griff Mussolini und die aufkommende Nazipartei in seinen Schriften an. Er wusste, wie alles kommen würde: schon vor 1933 sah er das spätere Schicksal von Büchern und Menschen voraus. Sein erster Roman, "Das Spinnennetz" behandelt die Nazis, die letzte Fortsetzung erschien zwei Tage vor Hitlers Bierkeller Putsch vom November 1923. Am Tage von Hitlers Machtergreifung verließ er Deutschland und ging nach Frankreich, brach sofort mit der Frankfurter Zeitung und tadelte seinen Freund Stefan Zweig, weil dieser sich nicht ebenfalls sofort von seinem deutschen Verleger löste.

Er hatte nie ein richtiges Heim. Als Journalist lebte er in Hotelzimmern (mit seiner Frau, bis diese geistig so krank wurde, dass sie in entsprechenden Kliniken untergebracht werden musste; danach hatte er zunächst eine und dann später eine andere Mätresse). Vor 1933 verdiente er gut und führte einen aufwendigen Lebensstil, wobei er gegenüber Bedürftigen immer sehr großzügig war; nach 1933 hatte er immer finanzielle Schwierigkeiten, verschwendete aber auch weiterhin das Geld, das er verdiente oder das ihm Freunde wie Zweig gaben, in ungezügelter und großzügiger Weise.

Er fühlte sich immer schuldig an den vielen Schlägen, die ihn trafen, von der Geisteskrankheit seiner Frau bis zum mittellosen Leben als Emigrant, sah sie als Strafen des Himmels an und identifizierte sich mit der Titelfigur eines anderen seiner großen Romane, "Hiob", der 1929 erschien. In seiner Verzweiflung griff er am Ende zur Flasche und starb mit 44 Jahren, im Sommer 1939, an Alkoholismus, drei Monate vor Ausbruch des zweiten Weltkriegs.

Sein letzter Roman "Die Legende vom Heiligen Trinker" war, wie die meisten seiner Werke, stark persönlich geprägt. Seine Haltung zu Gott hatte oftmals geschwenkt. Anfangs, in zwei Romanen von 1924 ("Hotel Savoy" und "Die Rebellion") hatte er die Existenz Gottes bestritten. Nun beschreibt er den unaufhaltsamen Verfall der Hauptfigur, die sich nach dem Tode zu sehnen beginnt, sich aber jetzt auf Gottes Gnade verlässt.

(Englische Rezension übersetzt von Thomas Dunskus)


The Berlin-Baghdad Express: The Ottoman Empire and Germany's Bid for World Power, 1898-1918
The Berlin-Baghdad Express: The Ottoman Empire and Germany's Bid for World Power, 1898-1918
von Sean McMeekin
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 10,60

3 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Jihad in WWI? A damp squib, 30. Oktober 2011
The real theme of this book is not the Berlin-Baghdad Railway, which receives little attention after the first quarter of the book, but Germany's hope to rouse the Muslims all over the world, and those in the Ottoman Empire in particular, to a jihad to undermine the British and French empires. McMeekin begins the story with the Kaiser who, from the moment of his accession in 1888, was romantically involved in the Orient and saw himself as the protector of Islam against any further encroachments by the British and French on the Islamic world. As relations between Germany on the one side and Britain and France on the other deteriorated and the Germans planned for a possible war with the Entente, they began to foment Islamic jihadism in the imperial possessions of the Entente. Max von Oppenheim was the driving force behind the sending out of agents to those areas for that purpose.

In 1899 and in 1908 the Germans received concessions from the Turks to build the Turkish section of the Berlin-Baghdad railway. They could have lost them during the Young Turk Revolution later in 1908: the new Finance Minister, Djavid Bey, heading a group that admired Britain, considered giving the concession to the British instead. The British egregiously spurned the Young Turk advances. Had they supported the Young Turks, Turkey might well have been on the British instead of on the German side in the First World War. As it was, Enver Pasha, the pro-German War Minister was committed, at first to hostile neutrality via-à-vis the Entente Powers and then to an alliance with Germany.

When the war broke out, just 70 miles or so, from Samara south-east to Baghdad, had been built in Mesopotamia, leaving a gap six times that length to the nearest railhead; and there were also two smaller gaps in the Amanus and Taurus mountains in Syria. The Germans also built the spur from Syria down to the Hejaz railway. But that railway ended at Medina and never reached Mecca, which was one reason why the Turks could not nip the Mecca-based Arab Revolt in the bud.

McMeekin shows that the entry of Turkey into the war on the German side was not a foregone conclusion; but the British seizure of two Dreadnoughts being constructed for Turkey in Britain tipped the balance that way.

When the war broke out the puppet Sultan Mehmed VI duly proclaimed a jihad against the Entente Powers. The proclamation had limited effect. Oppenheim wanted to cajole Hussein, the influential Hashemite Sherif of Mecca, into supporting the jihad; but Hussein resented the way the Young Turks were trying to tighten the control of Constantinople over the Sherifate. The attempts of the Germans to whip up the Muslims in Arabia against the British were singularly unsuccessful: the Arabs were too anti-Turkish for that. Besides, here, as in all the other areas where the Germans hoped to unleash jihad, money always spoke louder than either faith or nationalism. The potential leaders remained neutral for as long as possible and played off one side against the other in an ever-escalating bidding war, extorting vast sums of money and supplies of arms.

The British were successful in enlisting Hussein for their cause in 1916. McMeekin challenges the widespread idea, connected with Lawrence of Arabia, that this was a nationalist revolt: Hussein himself gave as the cause of his campaign that the Young Turk government was unIslamic. Not only the Arabs, but, as time went on, many Turks also turned against German officers and representatives - not so much for jihadi reasons, but to vent their resentment at arrogance of the Germans and because of the feeling that the Germans had dragged Turkey into a war which by 1916 they stood no chance of winning. After 1916 there were many incidents when Germans were killed not only by Arabs but by Turks also.

The Germans had been more successful with the Shia Grand Mufti of Karbala, who was at odds with Sunni Mecca and Sunni Constantinople. After exacting a huge sum of money from the Germans, in 1915 the Grand Mufti proclaimed a jihad to the Shias of the Ottoman and the Persian Empires. But again little came of it. The same was true of the alliance the Germans secured, at huge cost, with the Emir of Afghanistan in 1916. In Libya the head of the Sanussi order was a self-proclaimed Mahdi, who for a long time received bribes both from the Turks and from the British to join them. The Germans won that bidding war, and the Sanussis crossed the Egyptian border; but the British troops drove them back (1915).

With the collapse of any German hopes for a jihad by 1916 and no further developments in the story of the Berlin-Baghdad railway, both the ostensible and the real subject of this book effectively came to an end. McMeekin ends with two chapters which deal with other attempts by the Germans to unleash "quasi-religious" forces to undermine their enemies. The first of these was infinitely more effective than their attempt in the Muslim world: the Germans sent Lenin to undermine the Russian war-effort and financed Bolshevik anti-war publications in Russia. When Lenin came to power, he pulled Russia out of the war. The effect of this on Turkey was that the Russians withdrew from the one area in which their troops had been successful and far from war-weary: Eastern Anatolia, where, in the course of 1916, their armies had broken the Turkish forces and were half-way to Constantinople and to Ankara.

The Epilogue chapter deals with the second German attempt to undermine Russia from within: encouraging her Jews to rise in revolt in return for German support for Zionism. To this end Germany put pressure on the Turks to curb the jihad enthusiasm she was encouraging at the same time. The British were playing the same game, with more success than the Germans. Neither Germany nor Britain seemed to understand how support of Zionism was incompatible with their efforts to enlist Muslims in their cause.

The British, of course, came to regret it, and later did almost everything they could to appease the Arabs of Palestine. As for the Germans, the Nazis would again seek for allies among the Muslim zealots. It was Max von Oppenheim who, despite his own Jewish ancestry, kept the flame of Muslim jihad alive. He joined the Nazi Party in 1933, was made an honorary Aryan, and in 1940 it was he who put to Hitler the idea of enlisting the Mufti of Jerusalem as a fanatical ally.
Kommentar Kommentar (1) | Kommentar als Link | Neuester Kommentar: Oct 31, 2011 4:19 PM CET


Bismarck
Bismarck
von Jonathan Steinberg
  Gebundene Ausgabe

3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Strangely skewed, 15. September 2011
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Bismarck (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Jonathan Steinberg tells us in his Preface that he has had access, which no earlier biographers have had, to what contemporaries have said in letters and diaries about Bismarck, and those sources are certainly interesting to read. The result is an emphasis on Bismarck's complex personality. For some of his characteristics possible explanations are supplied in Freudian terms - transferences of how he related to his father and his mother. There is a convincing explanation of Bismarck's many attacks of bad health, as being due to rage whenever he was thwarted or to exhaustion, rather than elation, whenever he had won a hard-fought struggle. Gut-busting over-eating did not help. He frequently threatened to resign if he did not get his way over the most trivial issues. The mystery is that William I, however severe their disagreements, always refused to let him go. Perhaps it was because William paid more attention that Steinberg does to Bismarck's value as a diplomatic genius; for Steinberg the central point is, over and over again, the dominance that Bismarck's personality exerted over the King. At the same time the constitution Bismarck had devised and the fact that he was never a party leader with a substantial personal parliamentary following meant that he was totally dependent on the monarch and never had any personal parliamentary following.

Bismarck is shown repeatedly to have been deeply neurotic, repeatedly to the point of hysteria, hate-filled, vindictive, and paranoid (with some justification: he had made so many enemies, at Court and elsewhere). His intemperate rages drove his doctor to resign. (The next doctor, regarded by his colleagues as a quack, was curiously successful by treating Bismarck with the "tender loving care" with which noone had ever treated him before.) Some observers thought Bismarck was close to madness. He was a fascinating mixture of intense emotions, cool-headed calculation - and, combining the two, a willingness to gamble politically for very high stakes.

Steinberg tells us that his original draft of 800 pages had to be cut down to the present 480 pages of text, and I do sympathize with the dilemmas such a massive cut presents to an author. I would like to think that that accounts for what I think is in places a rather skimped and occasionally not very clear account of the political history. There are, for example, more illuminating accounts than we find here of the issues leading up to Olmütz, of Bismarck's sudden change of policy very early on during his time as Prussian representative at Frankfurt, and of his transfer from there to St Petersburg. There is no reference to Bismarck's recommending an alliance with the Liberals in 1853 and again in 1861, only a year before, as Minister-President, he would so spectacularly defy them. There is no explanation why King William I initially sent him to be ambassador in Paris rather than call him to head the government; nor why Bismarck kept the Prussian Parliament in existence; the "Primacy of Foreign Policy", which accounts for so many of Bismarck's twists and turns at home, gets no mention.

While it is interesting to read of the earlier careers of people associated with Bismarck - Roon and Moltke are examples - the space allocated to these beginnings seems to me disproportionate in the context of the biography. There are many other digressions which I think could profitably have been cut or at least reduced..

On the other hand, Steinberg devotes 39 pages to steering us ably and in detail through all the complexities of the two years between the reopening of the Schleswig-Holstein question and the outbreak of the war with Austria.

But then the treatment of the run up to the Franco-Prussian War begins only in 1868, with the Hohenzollern candidature for the Spanish throne, and has nothing on the background - the previous humiliations that Napoleon III had brought upon himself by having Bismarck reject his requests for "pourboires" to compensate the French for not having got anything out of the Austro-Prussian War, or on the steps that Bismarck had taken to make sure that France had no allies when the war came. But we do have a detailed account of the furious rows between Bismarck and most of the generals during the siege of Paris.

Bismarck's diplomacy after 1871 is also treated in little more than outline. It was bound to fail in the end as the result of its own contradictions; but the skill with which Bismarck kept it going for nearly twenty years is not brought out here. Astonishingly, there is no mention of Bismarck's disagreement with William II over relations with Russia, which, though not the principal reason for his fall, was cleverly used as an afterthought in Bismarck's resignation letter and which, coupled with Tenniel's famous cartoon in The Times, has so impressed itself on the public mind as symbolic of the difference between Bismarck's prudent and the Kaiser's crude diplomacy.

This book gives us a striking portrait of an extremely unpleasant personality (although he could charm as well as bully); a good insight into domestic politics and intrigues; but it is skewed against what made Bismarck really great by failing to give an adequate account of the diplomacy which prepared for the unification of Germany and which then piloted Germany between the rocks onto which the Kaiser would steer the ship.


Der deutsche Genius: Eine Geistes- und Kulturgeschichte von Bach bis Benedikt XVI. -
Der deutsche Genius: Eine Geistes- und Kulturgeschichte von Bach bis Benedikt XVI. -
von Peter Watson
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 49,99

24 von 24 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Enzyklopaedisch, 2. September 2011
Peter Watson zeigt in diesem Buch auf, dass die fortdauernde Beschäftigung mit der Nazi-Zeit, sogar auch in Lehrplänen für Schulen, das allgemeine Publikum in Großbritannien und den Vereinigten Staaten daran hindert, sich mit den enormen deutschen Beiträgen in der Zeit vor und nach Hitler auf allen Gebieten der Kultur gebührend zu befassen, ja diese manchmal überhaupt zur Kenntnis zu nehmen.

Watson greift alle Aspekte auf, eine gigantische Aufgabe, selbst wenn man nicht von ihm erwarten kann, alle Gebiete zu beherrschen, und somit manche seiner Betrachtungen tiefschürfend und erhellend, andere dagegen ein wenig oberflächlich sind; so gibt es hier und da Namenslisten, die dann aber nicht weiter besprochen werden, außer dass Watson sie irgendeiner bestimmten Gruppe zuordnet. Es wäre jedoch für mein Empfinden kleinlich einer solchen umfassenden Schatzkammer deswegen weniger als fünf Sterne zu erteilen.

Oft lenkt Watson unsere Aufmerksamkeit auf in britischen Kreisen kaum bekannte deutsche Erfolge, die zwar als solche von Bedeutung sind, jedoch keinen spezifisch deutschen Charakter haben. So haben deutsche Wissenschaftler ihre Gebiete enorm bereichert und werden damit im Buch auch stark herausgestell; doch ist die Wissenschaft international und nicht speziell deutsch in ihrem Wesen. (Erst als die Nazis die Relativitätstheorie als unwissenschaftlich ablehnten und rassische "Wissenschaften" zu unhaltbaren neuen Gipfeln führten, könnte man von solchen Eigenheiten sprechen). Hier sollen jedoch einige der Aspekte behandelt werden, die spezifisch deutsch sind.

Zuerst wäre dort die Art, die Rolle und die selbstauferlegten Ziele der deutschen Universitäten zu nennen. Bereits im 18. Jahrhundert gab es fünfzig Universitäten im damaligen Deutschland, denen England nur zwei entgegenzustellen hatte. Die bedeutendsten waren Halle in Preußen und Göttingen in Hannover. Sie waren vom Geist des Pietismus durchdrungen, einer Form des Protestantismus, die darauf abzielte, das Beste in sich selbst zu entwickeln, dabei jedoch mit der Pflicht, die Welt durch harte Arbeit, durch eigene Beiträge, durch wirkungsvolle Tätigkeit und durch Unbestechlichkeit zu verbessern. Friedrich Wilhelm I von Preußen (1713 bis 1740) hatte sich schon in 1708 dem Pietismus angeschlossen. Wie auch die anderen deutschen Landesherren, kontrollierte er die Universtäten, besetzte sie mit pietistischen Lehrern und förderte Pietisten in Beamtenschaft und Armee.

Obwohl die Pietisten tief religiös waren, brachen sie aber in den Universitäten die Herrschaft der Theologie und förderten Philosophie und weltliche Wissenschaft. Sie schufen und entwickelten den Begriff der "Bildung", der die Pflicht beinhaltete, in der Erziehung nicht rein rezeptiv zu bleiben, sondern auch den Weg dauernder Eigenentwicklung zu beschreiten, durch eigene Forschungstätigkeit und deren Beurteilung durch andere Forscher. Die Wichtigkeit, die den Universitäten vom Staat her zuerkannt wurde und die Art und Weise, wie sich diese methodisch in der Forschung organisierten, lieferten ohne Zweifel die Basis für die überragende Stellung der deutschen Wissenschaften im 19. Jahrhundert - der Staat war zwar in vielerlei Hinsicht autoritär, ermutigte jedoch die geistige Freiheit seiner Lehrer und Forscher. In den 1860er und 1870er Jahren erreichten die Technischen Hochschulen (im Gegensatz zu britischen Polytechnika) Prestige und Rang der Universitäten als Forschungszentren, was sich darin zeigte, dass sie ihren Studenten nicht nur ein technisches Diplom, sondern auch den Rang eines Doktors zuerkennen durften. Das wird auch die Erfindungen und Erfolge der deutschen Indusrie stark fördern.

Ein anderer spezifisch deutscher Aspekt dieser Kultur ist die "spekulative Philosophie", wie Watson sie nennt. Die deutsche "Aufklärung" betonte eine organische Entwicklung, im Unterschied zur Newton'schen externen Kausalität in den Wissenschaften. Man betrachtete dies als ein
philosophisches Prinzip, dass nicht nur das Verständnis der Geschichte und der Naturwissenschaften erlaubte, sondern auch das des Ichs und der Welt an sich; Genies und Dichter waren besonders befähigt, dieses Prinzip zu erkennen und auszudrücken. Der große Künstler erhebt die Künste, besonders die Musik, aus dem Bereich der bloßen Unterhaltung heraus in den der reinen Wahrheit.

Watson setzt sich mit den so deutschen Philosophien von Kant, Fichte, Schelling und Hegel auseinander, ist jedoch hier, wie ich meine, in seiner Zusammenfassung solcher an sich schon dunklen und schwerverständlichen Ideen nur begrenzt erfolgreich, ja, in Bezug auf Hegel, schon durchaus unzureichend. Auch die Betonung des Willens ist hauptsächlich bei deutschen Denkern anzutreffen, wie auch Heideggers Philosophie Elemente enthält, die ebenfalls spezifisch deutsch sind.

Nationalismus, Rassismus, Antsemitismus lassen sich außerhalb Deutschlands gleichfalls ausmachen, doch Watson geht auch auf die Umstände ein, durch die solche Ideen im Deutschland des 19.Jahrhunderts eine besondere Stärke annahmen, sodass man sie, im Nachhinein, als Saat des deutschen Nationalsozialismus im folgenden Jahrhundert ansehen kann. Im Hinblick auf diese Periode beschreibt er eingehend die abstoßenden Aspekte der Nazi-"Ästhetik", die man als typische deutsch bezeichnen könnte, wenn sie nicht ihr Spiegelbild im Stalinismus besäßen. In ähnlicher Weise erkennen wir eine spezifisch deutsche "Theologie" in der Kirche der "Deutschen Christen", die ihrerseits von deutschen Theologen wie Barth, Bultmann, Tillich oder Bonhoeffer bekämpft wurde, die mit ihren Lehren später internationale Bedeutung gewinnen sollten.

Zwei lange Kapitel setzen sich mit den Beiträgen von in dieser Zeit nach England oder in die USA ausgewanderten deutschen Intellektuellen intensiv auseinander.

Die letzten beiden Kapitel behandeln die Entwicklungen im Nachkriegsdeutschland, u.a. mit dem Bemühen einer Gruppe deutscher Denker, die deutsche Kultur vor der Nazizeit zu betrachten, mit dem Ziel, die Frage zu klären, warum diese Kultur nicht in der Lage gewesen war, sich gegen die Nazis zu behaupten. Da war der Historikerstreit (die Diskussion der Frage ob die Verbrechen der Nazis etwas spezifisch Deutsches darstellten, was jedoch bei Watson nur am Rande erwähnt wird) und die Debatte über den sogenannten deutschen Sonderweg. Auch die Romane von Grass, Böll und Schlink befassten sich mit solchen Fragen. Die Ereignisse von 1968 und das folgende Jahrzehnt stellten laut Konrad Jarausch endlich eine entschiedene antiautoritäre Entwicklung der Werte Westdeutschlands dar, wobei man überrascht ist, wieviele ostdeutsche Schriftsteller (die, außer Brecht, im Westen kaum bekannt sind) auch gegen das dortige Regime angingen.

Der Platz reicht nicht aus, auch noch etwa auf die Bedeutung des ernsthaftigen deutschen Theaters, oder die von Nachkriegsfilmen einzugehen, oder auf Watsons zusammenfassende Schlussbemerkungen, die den enormen Einfluss deutscher Ideen - ob man ihn nun gutheißt oder nicht - auf den Rest der Welt unterstreichen.

(Englische Rezension übersetzt von Thomas Dunskus)


Ein Kampf um Rom. Zweiter Band
Ein Kampf um Rom. Zweiter Band
Preis: EUR 0,00

1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Hinterlist und Heldentum, 10. August 2011
Der erste Band in dieser Kindle-Ausgabe (siehe meine Rezension) endete mit dem Eintreffen von Belisarius' großer und vielrassiger Armee in Italien, wo die Herrschaft des Kaisers von Byzanz wieder hergestellt und die Goten vertrieben werden sollten. Die verräterische Haltung Theodahads, des vorigen Gotenkönigs, hatte den Süden des Landes militärisch entblößt und Belisarius konnte bald Neapel einnehmen. Das nächste Ziel war Rom, von wo aus Witichis, der neue König, sich kampflos zurückzog, und schließlich Ravenna, die Hauptstadt des Gotenreiches.

Seine Aufgabe wurde Belisarius durch die Zerwürfnisse unter seinen Gegnern erleichtert, wobei die Risse nicht nur zwischen Goten und Italienern bestanden, sondern auch innerhalb beider Gruppen. Am Ende des ersten Bandes hatten die Goten den würdigen Witichis, einen Mann aus dem Volke, zum König gemacht. Die Entscheidung wurde jedoch von Graf Arahad, dem aristokratischen Führer eines anderen Gotenstammes, angefochten. Auf Seiten der Italiener stritten Cethegus, der Präfekt von Rom, und der kürzlich zum Papst gewählte Silverius um die Macht. Jeder intrigierte gegen den anderen, um Belisarius für die eigenen Zwecke auszunutzen. (In gewissen Einzelheiten nimmt sich Dahn große Freiheiten gegenüber der tatsächlichen Geschichte, so lässt er die Verwendung der Fälschung der Konstantinischen Schenkung drei Jahrhunderte früher stattfinden). Cethegus gewann schließlich den Kampf und erreichte, dass Belisarius ihm die Herrschaft über einen Teil Roms zuerkannte, bevor die byzantinische Armee den schwieriger zu verteidigenden Teil der Stadt betreten durfte.

Bei den Goten wurden Witichis und seine geliebte Frau von den Beratern des Königs genötigt, ihre Heirat aufzulösen, damit Witichis Mataswintha, aus der Nachkommenschaft Theoderichs des Großen, zum Weib nehmen konnte. Ihm (und uns) wird gepredigt, dass um das Heil des Volkes zu sichern kein persönliches Opfer zu gross sein kann.

Des Verrats ist kein Ende. Mataswintha verrät ihren Gemahl. Cethegus, der seinen Verbündeten Belisarius besiegt sehen will, hat ihm wichtige Informationen vorenthalten. Belisarius selbst wurde durch seinen eigenen Kaiser, der auf einen möglicherweise zu mächtigen Emporkömmling eifersüchtig war, in seiner Augabe behindert. Belisarius war anfangs als der einzige Feind der Goten dargestellt worden, der sich mit Witichis an edler Gesinnung messen konnte, wir sehen ihn aber jetzt als einen arroganten und eingebildeten Menschen, der die Kraft der Goten unterschätzte. Er marschierte gegen Ravenna in der Zuversicht, dass sich die Goten hinter den Mauern der Stadt verschanzen würden, und war nun überrascht, als sie statt dessen gegen ihn vorrückten. Nach einer großen und eindrucksvoll beschriebenen Schlacht mussten sich seine Kämpfer nach Rom retten, wo sie ihrerseits von den Goten eingeschlossen wurden. Die Einzelheiten der Kämpfe innerhalb und außerhalb der Stadt sind schwer zu verfolgen, weil, auf Kindle jedenfalls, man keine Karte zur Hand hat. Die Belagerung aber schwächte die Goten mehr als die Römer, und die Goten zogen sich nach Ravenna zurück. Auch hier gibt es wieder einen beeindruckenden Abschnitt über den Fall der Stadt nach langen Kämpfen und über die Abdankung des Witichis, wobei die Kapitulationsbedingungen prompt und in verräterischer Weise gebrochen wurden. Belisarius seinerseits wurde auch zum Opfer der gewundenen Machenschaften des teuflischen Cethegus.

Der zweite, hier besprochene Band endet mit dem dramatischen aber unhistorischen Tod des Witichis; der dritte und letzte Band ist (noch?) nicht auf Kindle erhältlich."Die Welt ist eine grosse Lüge", sagt Witichis, und das Buch vermittelt die Botschaft, dass auch ein so edler Gote, trotz aller Tapferkeit, dem endlosen und komplizierten Verrat, der das Buch durchzieht, nicht widerstehen konnte; er ist dem Verhängnis anheimgegeben, und sein Sturz ist voller Tragik und Pathos. Es ist eine politische sowie eine persönliche Tragik, denn Dahn macht den Ablauf der Ereignissen ziemlich stark abhängig von den Persönlichkeiten seiner zahlreichen Darsteller.

In diesem, wie auch in dem vorigen Band, gibt es viele packende Abschnitte, aber ich muss doch sagen, dass ich inzwischen von Dahns Klischees etwas ermüdet bin - es gibt einfach zuviele "blitzende Augen", "klirrende Waffen", "lange Wimpern", "errötende" oder "erbleichende" Frauen u.s.w.

(Englische Rezension übersetzt von Thomas Dunskus)
Kommentar Kommentare (2) | Kommentar als Link | Neuester Kommentar: Feb 12, 2013 2:13 AM CET


Seite: 1 | 2 | 3