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Rezensionen verfasst von
Peter Leerskov "The Strategist, www.lace.dk" (Denmark)
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Europa Postleitzahlenkarte
Europa Postleitzahlenkarte
von Stiefel Eurocart
  Landkarte
Preis: EUR 19,90

1 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Perfekt, 29. November 2012
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Europa Postleitzahlenkarte (Landkarte)
Ich habe bis jetzt drei Stück davon gekauft. Gute Qualität. Kann sofort aufgehängt werden. Absolut empfehlenswert für alle in EU Versandhandel.


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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Don't buy this book!, 4. August 2010
I buy 50 business books a year by Amazon ... and I have never returned one of them.

This book has NOTHING to do with sales process engineering ... it is simply excerpts of basic 101 introductions to sales and marketing and process and engineering and lean. Very simple, basic articles from Wikipedia.

Amazing. It should not be sold on Amazon. It is embarrasing.

So, don't buy this book. Just browse Wikipedia, if need be.


Key Management Solutions: 50 Leading Edge Solutions to Executive Problems
Key Management Solutions: 50 Leading Edge Solutions to Executive Problems
von Tom Lambert
  Taschenbuch

5.0 von 5 Sternen Business questions that make you think and promote dialogue, 4. August 2006
"Any fool can offer you answers. It takes genius to ask the right questions." Albert Einstein.

I like this book a lot ... a book with questions that make you think and rethink.

I like playing the devil's advocate ... this book gives great inspiration for being it.

This book is an obvious choice for consultants. For it is just as obvious for many business people. Why ask the consultant, if you can get the questions for a book's price? But also remember how many times you participate in a decision-making process and/or meetings where you would like to make a great contribution ... read this book and you will get a lot of inspiration for contributing.

I have very many business books, but this paperback I often take with me for the travel before an important meeting. Either because I want to see if there are questions that I have forgotten to write down or - if I am the presenter - to understand what questions my audience or superiors could or should ask me!

Remember that you often may need fresh ideas and questions when you go to the fifth board meeting of a particular business or perhaps the fifth board meeting in the same week!

The problem may be that the participants all are somewhat into the same mindset. This book will always provide you with some very important business questions that should enable the meeting to take a new and interesting angle.

I never managed to read this book from cover to cover. To me, it is more a reference book with a lot of skilled questions that will make me think about a particular issue.

The author Tom Lambert covers most business areas: vision and mission, people, leadership, decisions, numbers, markets, change, etc.

I personally also like using the great strategic questions suggested in EXECUTION by Ram Charan & Larry Bossidy as well as in WINNING by Jack Welch. Both are great books by business people that I really recommend. Both are available in audio editions as well.

Peter Leerskov,

MSc in International Business (Marketing & Management) and Graduate Diploma in E-business


Web Usability - Deutsche Ausgabe (DPI Grafik)
Web Usability - Deutsche Ausgabe (DPI Grafik)
von Jakob Nielsen
  Taschenbuch

9 von 14 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Web usability book of the year 2006! No more excuses. Use it!, 27. Juli 2006
Ten years ago, the Web was exciting to people. Today it's routine. It's a tool. If it's convenient, they will use it; if not, they won't. Users are getting less tolerant of difficult sites, so every design flaw means lost business. Thus, usability has more more important than ever.

This is the introduction of the reviewed book and I fully agree that it is time we prioritize Web usability. Of course, we all know about the fact that usability is important, but are we only paying lip service to the issue. When we decide between great design and great us-ability issues there's is often a trade-off. How often do we accept a lower level of usability in order to show off cool design? By the way, it is not that difficult to measure: Can people use the site at all? Test it!

Author Jakob Nielsen has a world-class reputation as Web usability expert since 1995 and this book co-authored by Hoa Loranger proves that he is still going strong.

A "practice of simplicity" has always been characterizing Jakob Nielsen's approach to us-ability. A picture is worth a 1000 words and thus the authors has filled this book with new screen shots that show what design mistakes we should avoid. The authors' visualizing and keeping it simple approach makes this book very easy to digest. If you have your own Web site you probably cannot help browsing your own web site to find design mistakes.

After having read this book with a huge number of best practices, why do you still need to do your own user testing? The reason is because usability guidelines are based on three levels of research:
* general guidelines: user behaviour across most web sites
* specialized guidelines: findings about specific genres or areas of sites (such as e-commerce usability or e-government services)
* specific guidelines: detailed findings about a specific site and its customers

This book only deals with the general guidelines. They may solve 50-80% of your usability problems, but to become best-in-class you need to go all the way to the specific guide-lines.

I like Nielsen's $200 user test. It makes it accessible for anybody. No more excuses. Pick 3-4 people in your target group. Give them some specific tasks for your web site. Then observe. Discover what users actually do, not what they say they do (via questionnaires, etc.). So observe, don't survey. Discuss what you have learned and make the changes. Test again, if need be. It's simple, it is cheap, and it is fast. Use.it!

I have always been very inspired by Nielsen's manifesto for usability. But beware. He may be a little radical in his approach to usability (although seemingly less so as he matures!). For instance, I always found the design of his own Web site awful. It is very usable obvi-ously, but .... To me it just proves the fact that all Web site owners have to find their own right balance between cool design and great usability.

I also recommend Steve Krug's easy-to-read "Don't make me think", and McGovern's books on Web Content. I addition, I strongly recommend the Eisenberg brothers' book on "A call for Action", especially targeted for the e-commerce segment.

A final note: This book is about your customers and what they need, not about you. If that is of your concern, then do spend the next week in companion with this book. Ultimately, it is about you also. Once you start working actively with how people interact with your de-sign, you can make it better than your competitor's.
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Built for Growth: Expanding Your Business Around the Corner or Across the Globe
Built for Growth: Expanding Your Business Around the Corner or Across the Globe
von Arthur Rubinfeld
  Gebundene Ausgabe

5.0 von 5 Sternen Expert advice on retail chain locationing, 23. Mai 2006
Rubinfeld is one of the masters in the retail locationing process. I own about 50 books in English and German on retail management, but none has included the expert advice on the very specialized retail locationing process. At least not compared to Rubinfeld's understanding. Both from a very strategic point-of-view and down to the nitty-gritty details of the legal agreement.

Rubinfeld's experience from Starbuck's rapid expansion in the 90s is very helpful, but he also adds a lot of other interesting retail cases from his work as an independent consultant.

The book's website includes very interesting checklists, but is not as impressive as you would expect based on the references made in the book.

The title's focus on "Expanding your business ... across the globe" is misleading in my opinion. Rubinfeld's advice hardly crosses the Atlantic nor the Pacific Ocean. But if you are interested in his ideas and concepts, you'll soon see that it doesn't matter. The principles remain the same with some adjustments for local responsiveness...

Being a chairman of a small retail chain, I have already put the author's advice into practice in the negotiations for a new retail location. They are easy to follow.

I also highly recommend the book's excellent chapters on retail chain financials. It is one of the first books that clearly distinguish between retail chain earnings and store earnings. Rubinfeld's focus on having a robust proforma economic model is key - also in my experience. And this is irrespective of whether you own all the stores yourself or also include a franchise system.

Peter Leerskov,

MSc in International Business (Marketing & Management) and Graduate Diploma in E-business


Alignment: Using the Balanced Scorecard to Create Corporate Synergies: How to Apply the Balanced Scorecard to Corporate Strategy
Alignment: Using the Balanced Scorecard to Create Corporate Synergies: How to Apply the Balanced Scorecard to Corporate Strategy
von Robert Steven Kaplan
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 27,91

4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Translate, cascade and align your strategies, 23. Mai 2006
This book is about organizational alignment. It is the fourth in a series of thought-leading books on how to translate strategy into actions - via balanced scorecard, strategy maps, and the strategy-focused organization.

The authors start with a wonderful story:

Imagine an eight-person shell racing up the river populated by highly trained rowers, but each with different ideas of how to achieve success. But rowing at different speeds and in different directions could cause the shell to travel in circles and perhaps capsize. The winning team invariably rows in beautiful synchronism; each rower strokes powerfully but consistently with all the others, guided by a coxswain [corporate center], who has the responsibility for pacing and steering the course of action.

Unfortunately, many firms are like an uncoordinated shell. They consist of strong business units, each populated by highly trained, experienced and motivated executives. But the efforts of the individual businesses are not coordinated.

Unsurprisingly, the authors suggest that their four scorecard perspectives on financials, customers, processes, as well as growth/learning also could be used to create organizational alignment and also find synergies, e.g.

- FINANCIAL: acquiring and integrating other firms, monitoring and governance processes, skills in negotiating with external entities (capital providers, etc.)

- CUSTOMERS: leverage common customers (cross-sales), corporate brand, common customer value propositions across the world,

- PROCESSES: exploiting core competencies in product or production technologies, sourcing or distribution skills, etc.

- LEARNING AND GROWTH: Enhancing human capital thru excellent HR practices, leveraging a common technology, sharing best-practices and knowledge.

The book does not only focus on how to align the corporate-level and businesses, it also covers how to align towards support functions (finance, IT and HR), external business partners (customers, suppliers) and even the board.

Don't buy this book as your first on scorecards. It requires that you have read some of the previous published articles or books by the author team. However, if you are a balanced scorecard practitioner, then this book adds yet another dimension to our understanding of how to make scorecard systems work in an organization.

Being a corporate strategist, I can use most of this thinking in my day-to-day work - and I can highly recommend it to all other scorecard insiders.

If you're interested in Balanced Scorecard, you should obviously read the core by Kaplan and Norton - especially the "Strategy-Focused Organization". But I also recommend a very capable book by the Swedes Olve et al (2003) - "Making Scorecards Actionable: Balancing Strategy and Control" - that even includes some thinking on why balanced scorecards go wrong - and what to do about it. Paul Niven (2005) does the same in his "Balanced scorecard diagnostics".

If you're even more interested in performance measurement systems, then do also consider "Performance Prism" by Neely et al (2002) that takes performance systems to the next level. Personally, I don't believe they've designed balanced scorecard's successor, but they have many interesting perspectives on stakeholders, choice of measurements, and the relationship between cause and effect.

Peter Leerskov,

MSc in International Business (Marketing & Management) and Graduate Diploma in E-business


Creating Value: Successful Business Strategies, Second Edition
Creating Value: Successful Business Strategies, Second Edition
von Shiv S. Mathur
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 48,09

5.0 von 5 Sternen A fresh approach to strategy - especially relevant for b2b, 2. Mai 2006
I have a 20-year-old article in my files. It's by Shiv Mathur and I originally found it in McKinsey Quarterly. Since then, I have wondered why this bright thinker did not publish more on strategy.

Well, now I have found the extended version in this 2001-book.

Beware! There are very many books on strategy and management out there, but not very many that are really insightful. My suggestion is that you pick this one next time ... especially if you work in b2b or industrial markets.

The real reason why I kept the original article is his work on differentiation, which is elaborated in chapter 5. Mathur and his co-author Kenyon outline 4 different ways of positioning a competitive strategy.

In a deceptively simple 4-square matrix they present four situations and their related strategies. The two dimensions are merchandise and support. Those features that customers see as differentiating how the seller helps them choosing, obtaining and then using the offering, constitute SUPPORT differentiation. All other features are MERCHANDISE differentiation. I my old article, I think Mathur used the terms hardware vs. software. Other authors sometimes use the dimensions of physical vs. non-physical attributes when the core element is a physical good.

An example: An automobile's merchandise features could include colour, shape, size, performance characteristics. Its support dimensions could include the test drive, instruction book, delivery service, servicing arrangements and service agent network.

If an offering is bought with little attention of differences in any of the dimensions, it is a COMMODITY-BUY. If the offering is highly differentiated in both dimensions, it is a SYSTEM-BUY. If high in support, but not in merchandise, it's a SERVICE-BUY, and in the reverse case a PRODUCT-BUY.

If you have read the strategy books by Michael Porter and Treacy/Wiersema, then you will find a clear connection between these findings. A commodity-buy is the obvious choice for the Porter's cost leader and Treacy/Wiersema's operational excellent strategy. A product-buy looks a lot like the original meaning of Porter's differentiation strategy and Treacy/Wiersema's product leader strategy. Service-buy is Treacy/Wiersema's Customer Intimacy strategy. System-buy is a new dimension that clearly suggests that there are four different generic strategies. Not only three.

Mathur manages in this book to explode the original four strategies to 16 different strategies by subdividing each of the four. This section includes very practical insights for the skilled reader.

This book is also readable because it doesn't just repeat old strategy thinking, but manages to both add to current state-of-the-art thinking and also criticize old thinking. One example is Porter's ubiquitous Five Forces industry analysis. The authors argue that it is very seldom this analysis - presented in most strategy books - provides really valuable lessons by analysing an industry. We need to dig much deeper. All the way down to the "offering". Otherwise the conclusions may become too general. Having spent 15 years with business strategy, I must say that I have experienced the same problem over and over again. After having done the Five Forces industry analysis, we quickly realize that if we did not get much closer to the "offering", the effort would have been wasted. Interesting work of course, but wasted...

Interestingly, Mathur's framework is very close in their insight to the Swedish network theorists (focusing on industrial relationships and network) that today are integrated into the European Industrial Marketing and Purchasing group of researchers. Unfortunately this IMP group is not very good at gaining access to a broader audience. But Mathur's book is a great substitute to some of their findings ...

Peter Leerskov,

MSc in International Business (Marketing & Management) and Graduate Diploma in E-business


Balanced Scorecard Diagnostics: Maintaining Maximum Performance
Balanced Scorecard Diagnostics: Maintaining Maximum Performance
von Paul R. Niven
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 35,90

1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Why Scorecards don't work - and how to solve it, 6. Oktober 2005
Why do as many as half of all balanced scorecard users not achieve the results they hoped for? Doesn't the balanced scorecard work in practice?
David Niven is an expert on Balanced Scorecard and his first book was an easy-to-read, well-structured manual of how to make scorecards work: "Balanced scorecard - step-by-step" (2002). It bridged the gap between practice and theory - especially for newcomers to the concept.
In this new book, Niven tries to bridge another emerging gap. It is the gap between those questioning the usefulness of balanced scorecard, based on the many unsuccessful implementation attempts, and what people like Niven (and I) believe to be reality: that the scorecard framework remains sound, but must be instituted with rigor and discipline if you expect to get results.
Why aren't many scorecard users happy?
Niven believes that the trouble lies in the methods used to implement the Balanced Scorecard. Many firms have been lured by the seductive simplicity of the scorecard model, believing it could be easily implemented and produce results with a minimum of care and feeding. According to Niven, troubled implementations stem from many sources, e.g.
- A lack of executive sponsorship to reinforce the Scorecard's value within the organization,
- Tired [lagging] metrics reflecting the past with no regard to the drivers of future success, and
- Management systems that continue to reward unbalanced, largely financial, performance
How do we solve it?
Niven's approach is basically to put Kaplan and Norton's five principles of the "Strategy-Focused Organization" (2001) into a more practical approach. The messages, obviously, are the same. But Niven manages to make it easier to comprehend. And he challenges the reader throughout the book. The diagnostics dimension of the book is furthermore incorporated at the end of each of the nine chapters where we find self-assessment questions.
This week I went to a conference in Copenhagen where Harvard-professor Robert Kaplan spoke about the balanced scorecard. Kaplan, being one of the inventors, acknowledged that too many balanced scorecards did not succeed. It is a paradox, since the balanced scorecard was incepted to overcome to problem that strategies weren't properly implemented. But if the system (or scorecard) to finally make the strategy implementation work doesn't work either, then we're in real trouble. So is the concept, of course.
Kaplan's suggestion to make a successful implementation of the scorecard is - like Niven's - to view it as a change project. The change programme goes thru three phases: mobilization (unfreezing), alignment (change), and sustainment (re-freezing). Kaplan specified the details as described below:
1st phase: MOBILIZATION ("the case for change"):
Principle: #1 Mobilize change thru Executive leadership
Leadership objective: Achieve commitment at the top, build the executive team, and build the case for change
Core competency: The catalyst's role is to be a missionary. The action list includes to advocate, to educate, and to sell a new way of managing.
Management role: Executive education (the need for strategic execution) via conferences, in-house workshops, and readings.
2nd phase: ALIGNMENT ("early wins")
Principle: #2 translate the strategy into action, #3 align the organization.
Leadership objective: Define and clarify the strategy, specify long-term targets, and communicate to workforce
Core competency: The project team's role is as consultant and change agent. The action list includes to design strategy maps, to design scorecards/targets, to create alignment/cascade, and to overcome resistance.
Management role: Strategy maps, balanced scorecards, First Report, Link business and support groups to the strategy, and to rationalize initiatives
3rd phase: SUSTAINMENT ("irreversible momentum")
Principle: #4 Motivate the staff, #5 Govern the Organization
Leadership objective: Reinforce strategic message: Employees follow the leader, Enforce a performance-based culture: get results, and Lead the new management meeting
Core competency: The office of strategy management's role is to be the "chief of staff" (like in the military and government). The action list includes to install accountability, to shape the executive agenda, and to integrate governance.
Management role: Scorecard reporting system, HR processes aligned, Accountability and rewards aligned, and meetings focused on scorecard objectives and measures.
If you're interested in Balanced Scorecard, you should obviously read the original work by Kaplan and Norton. But I also recommend a very capable book by the Swedes Olve et al (2003) - "Making Scorecards Actionable: Balancing Strategy and Control" - that also focuses on why balanced scorecards go wrong - and what to do about it.
If you're even more interested in performance measurement systems, then do also consider "Performance Prism" by Neely et al (2002) that takes performance systems to the next level. Personally, I don't believe they've designed balanced scorecard's successor, but they have many interesting perspectives on stakeholders, choice of measurements, and the relationship between cause and effect.
Peter Leerskov,
MSc in International Business (Marketing & Management) and Graduate Diploma in E-business


Business Plans That Work: A Guide for Small Business
Business Plans That Work: A Guide for Small Business
von Jeffry A Timmons
  Taschenbuch

5.0 von 5 Sternen Best small book on step-by-step Business Plans, 15. September 2005
This small book does a splendid job in explaining the business planning process more simple and uncomplicated than most books on business planning that often are too comprehensive and detailed - sometimes probably creating "paralysis by analysis" for the users.
The approach is a practical step-by-step procedure with the same specific case study throughout the book ("FireFly Toys"). At the end of the book, there's an alternative case study - including Powerpoint presentation - on another industry ("Fossa Medical"). Both case studies' 4-page executive summaries should inspire each and every manager to present his venture or business in this concise and exemplary manner...
It is indeed a no-nonsense guidebook and I especially like the small critical comments that the authors have inserted in the margins (as speech balloons).
Being a corporate strategist, I spend most of my time working with strategic issues including business plans. So I read a book on this topic with a subtle skepticism. But it was a pleasant surprise ;-)
Thus, I can highly recommend this easy-to-read 183-page book.
Peter Leerskov,
MSc in International Business (Marketing & Management) and Graduate Diploma in E-business


Call to Action: Secret Formulas to Improve Online Results
Call to Action: Secret Formulas to Improve Online Results
von Bryan Eisenberg
  Gebundene Ausgabe

10 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Making websites work. E-Commerce book of the year 2005?, 4. August 2005
Why do website conversion rates remain at a gloomy 2-5 per cent?
"Call for Action" focuses on how we can improve the conversion rates. Not from a technical or academic or conceptual standpoint. Instead it takes a rare PRACTICAL and down-to-earth approach on how to improve conversion rates to improve sales and thus profits.
What is CONVERSION? Virtually all websites have a persuasive purpose; to get someone to subscribe, to register, to inquire or to buy something. And if all we get is 2-5 per cent conversion, we ought to review our website. Do we offer a product or service that could meet the needs of more than 2-5 per cent of the market? Can visitors find that, solution on the website? Do they understand our offer's value? Was it made at the right time? Are we sure they're coming back?
NAVIGATION is the biggest challenge websites face, the authors argue. The issues are: What to do with the traffic once it lands on the website? How to get visitors to take the first action and click deeper? And once there, how to induce visitors to click to the next step, and the next, and the next?
The fundamental idea is that a PERSUASIVE ARCHITECTURE links a visitor's buying experience to our company's sales process. It bridges the buy/sell process in a measurable way. If you can influence visitor behaviour and empathize with visitor motivations, you can influence results to provide a better experience and more frequent, effective conversions.
The book is filled with illustrative screen dumps of websites (before and after a change). This is a great benefit of such a how-to field book on e-commerce improvements. In my opinion, most e-commerce sites can recover the book's cost price in a few days just by following one or two of the practical suggestions in the many diverse case studies.
The primary focus of this book is e-Commerce. The key messages on conversion, however, are important to anyone running a large website.
This is a rare book. I've been involved in e-commerce since 1997 and read many interesting books on this topic. But I've never found such a practical approach to optimising e-commerce web sites as this one.
The brothers Eisenberg call themselves "wizards of web". I agree and hope my existing and future competitors don't read and act on this book. These secret formulas to improve online results are very effective, indeed.
If you're looking for a conceptual e-commerce theory, please look somewhere else. This is about the nuts and bolts about making money with an e-commerce web site. If you don't have or don`t plan to have such a website; forget about this book. Then it's a waste of time.
I also recommend Jakob Nielsen's books on web usability and Steve Krug's easy-to-read "Don't make me think".
Peter Leerskov,
MSc in International Business (Marketing & Management) and Graduate Diploma in E-business


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